Committees & Staff

 

Supporters

 

Credits

 

Summa Merit Awards

 

Magna Merit Awards

 

Invited Speakers Declaration

 

Moderator Declaration

 

Authors with Declaration

 

Authors without Declaration

 

Author Index

 

 

Weekend Clinical Intensive Course

Body MRI: The Added Clinical Value of Evolving MR Technology

Organizers: Shahid M. Hussain, M.D., Ph.D., Caroline Reinhold, M.D. & Evis Sala, M.D., Ph.D., F.R.C.R.

Room 105-106 08:30-17:15            Moderators: Elizabeth A. Morris, M.D., Evis Sala, M.D., F.R.C.R. Patrik Zamecnik, M.D.

08:30           . Abdominal MRI: Protocol Optimization & Choice of Sequences

Shahid M. Hussain, M.D., Ph.D.

 

08:50           . Diffusion Weighted Imaging: The Added Value in the Abdomen

Bachir Taouli, M.D.

 

09:10           . Whole Body MRI: How to Do & What It Tells You

Anwar Padhani, M.D., M.R.C.P., F.R.C.R.

 

09:30           . Body MRA/MRV: Approaches & Strategies

Shreyas S. Vasanawala, M.D., Ph.D.

 

10:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

10:30           . Dense Breast: The Added Value of MRI in Screening & Staging

Elizabeth A. Morris, M.D.

 

11:00           . Difficult Breast Lesions: A Case-Based Practical Approach

Bruno Giuffre, M.D., F.R.A.C.R.

 

11:30           . Multiparametric Approach to Treatment Response in Breast Cancer

Nola M. Hylton, Ph.D.

 

12:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

13:30           . Anatomy & Staging of Vulva Cancers: All You Need to Know

Evis Sala, M.D., Ph.D., F.R.C.R.

 

14:00           . Multiparametric MRI of the Prostate in 30 Minutes

Jelle O. Barentsz, M.D., Ph.D.

 

14:30           . MR Enterography - Crohn's Disease

Diego R. Martin, M.D., Ph.D.

 

15:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

15:30           . Unusual Adnexal Lesions: How to be More Specific with MRI

Seung Hyup Kim, M.D.

 

16:00           . MRI of Ovarian Cancer: When & How?

Nandita M. de Souza, M.D., F.R.C.R.

 

16:30           . Cervical Cancer: Role of MRI in Patient Management

Kaori Togashi, M.D., Ph.D.

 

17:00           . Adjournment/Meet the Teachers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weekend Educational Course

Preclinical MR of Cancer - Addressing Clinical Needs

Organizers: Kevin M. Brindle, D.Phil. & Sabrina M. Ronen, Ph.D.

Room 109-110 08:30-17:15            Moderators: Kevin M. Brindle, D.Phil. & Sabrina M. Ronen, Ph.D.

08:30           . Tumor Metabolism

Kevin M. Brindle, D.Phil.

 

09:00           . Tumor Physiology

Hagit Dafni, Ph.D.

 

09:30           . Tumor 'Omics'

John R. Griffiths, D.Phil., M.B.B.S.

 

10:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

10:30           . How to Study Cancer Cell Models

E. Jim Delikatny, Ph.D.

 

11:00           . How to Perform MRI/MRS in Animal Models

Chantal Rémy, Ph.D.

 

11:30           . Tumor Lipid Metabolism

Franca Podo, D.Sc.

 

12:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

13:30           . Tumor Energy Metabolism

Sebastián Cerdán, Ph.D.

 

14:00           . pH in Cancer

Robert J. Gillies, Ph.D.

 

14:30           . Molecular Imaging in Cancer

Dmitri Artemov, Ph.D.

 

15:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

15:30           . Tumor Vasculature

Rinat Abramovitch, Ph.D.

 

16:00           . Tumor Cellularity

Charles S. Springer,Jr., Ph.D.

 

16:30           . Detecting Specific Drug Responses

Sabrina M. Ronen, Ph.D.

 

17:00           . Adjournment/Meet the Teachers

 

Weekend Educational Course

Molecular & Cellular Imaging: From the Bench to the Bed

Organizers: Jeff W. M. Bulte, Ph.D. & Paula J. Foster, Ph.D.

Room 203-204 08:30-17:15            Moderators: Jeff W. M. Bulte, Ph.D. & Florence Gazeau, Ph.D.

08:30           . Molecular Imaging in 2012

Claire Corot, Ph.D.

 

09:00           . PARACEST Agents

Enzo Terreno, Ph.D.

 

09:30           . T1 Agents

Eva J. Toth, Ph.D.

 

10:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

10:30           . The Physics & Chemistry of Nanometer-Sized Materials for Molecular Imaging

Kevin M. Bennett, Ph.D.

 

11:00           . Interactions of USPIO with the Biological Microenvironment

Florence Gazeau, Ph.D.

 

11:30           . Engineered Nanoparticles

Taeghwan Hyeon, Ph.D.

 

12:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

13:30           . Bimodal Nanoparticles

Samuel C. Grant, Ph.D.

 

14:00           . Toxicity of Nanoparticles

Uwe Himmelreich, Ph.D.

 

14:30           . Imaging of Neuroinflammation

Vincent Dousset, M.D.

 

15:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

15:30           . 19F MRI Cell Tracking

Ulrich Flögel, Ph.D.

 

16:00           . Detecting Amyloid-Beta Plaques in Alzheimer's Disease

Thomas Mueggler, Ph.D.

 

16:30           . How to Bring an Agent to the Market

Shelton D. Caruthers, Ph.D.

 

17:00           . Adjournment /Meet the Teachers

 

Weekend Educational Course

Perfusion Imaging

Organizers: Kamil Uludag, Ph.D. & Matthias J. P. van Osch, Ph.D.

Room 210-211 08:30-18:05            Moderators: Kamil Uludag, Ph.D. & Matthias J. P. van Osch, Ph.D.

Perfusion Physiology

08:30           . Anatomy of the Microvasculature, Physiology & Autoregulation

David W. Howells, Ph.D.

 

Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI (DSC-MRI)

09:00           . Introduction & from Signal to Concentration

Linda Knutsson, Ph.D.

 

09:20           . Arterial Input Function & Deconvolution

Birgitte F. Kjølby, Ph.D.

 

09:40           . Pitfalls in DSC-MRI : BBB-Breakdown, Dispersion & Delay

Fernando Calamante, Ph.D.

 

10:00           . Application: Acute Stroke

Søren Christensen, Ph.D.

 

10:20           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI (DCE-MRI)

10:40            Introduction & Acquisition Methods

Josephine H. Naish, Ph.D.

 

11:00           . From the Simplest to the Most Advanced DCE-Model

David L. Buckley, Ph.D.

 

11:20           . Applications: From Brain Tumors to Skeletal Studies

Geoffrey J. M. Parker, Ph.D.

 

11:40           . Technical Challenges in Cardio Perfusion MRI

Michael Jerosch-Herold, Ph.D.

 

12:00           . Subtle BBB-Breakdown Detection in Neurodegenerative Disease

Paul A. Armitage, Ph.D.

 

12:20           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL)

13:30           . Introduction & Different Approaches to Labeling

Eric C. Wong, M.D., Ph.D.

 

14:00           . Quantification: QUIPSS, Single T1 & Multi T1

Laura M. Parkes, Ph.D.

 

14:20           . Improving the ASL Experiment (Background Suppression, Vascular Crushing)

Frank Q. Ye, Ph.D.

 

14:40           . Application: ASL in Neuroradiology

Joseph A. Maldjian, M.D.

 

15:00           . ASL Outside the Brain

David C. Alsop, Ph.D.

 

15:20           . Ultra-High Field ASL: Sequence & Hardware Solutions

Susan T. Francis, Ph.D.

 

15:40           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

Advanced Microvascular Imaging

16:00           . Non-Invasive Blood Volume Measurements

Manus J. Donahue, Ph.D.

 

16:20           . Calibrated BOLD & Oxygen Extraction Fraction Measurements

Daniel P. Bulte, Ph.D.

 

16:40           . From Macro- to Microvascular ASL: ASL Angiography & Flow Territory Mapping

Michael Helle, Dipl.Phys.

 

17:00           . Application: Functional ASL, Pharma Perfusion MRI & Reactivity Measurements

Hanzhang Lu, Ph.D.

 

17:20           . Vessel-Size Imaging: Technique & Applications

Irene Troprès, Ph.D.

 

17:50           . Adjournment /Meet the Teachers

 

 

Weekend Educational Course

Measuring Diffusion Properties in Tissue (Morning)

Organizers: Karla L. Miller, Ph.D. & Jacques-Donald Tournier, Ph.D.

Room 212-213 08:30-12:45            Moderators: Karla L. Miller, Ph.D. & Jacques-Donald Tournier, Ph.D.

08:30           . Introduction: Diffusion for Dummies

Lawrence R. Frank, Ph.D.

 

09:00           . Diffusion Acquisition & Diffusion Weighting

Stefan Skare, Ph.D.

 

09:30           . The Diffusion Tensor & Derived Indices

Gwenaelle L. Douaud, Ph.D.

 

10:00           . Orientation & Tractography

Jennifer Campbell, Ph.D.

 

10:30           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

11:00           . Higher Order Descriptions of Orientation

Alan Connelly, Ph.D.

 

11:30           . Biophysics of Diffusion in Tissue

Joseph J. H. Ackerman, Ph.D.

 

12:00           . Toward Measurements of Tissue Microstructure

Evren Ozarslan, Ph.D.

 

12:30           . Adjournment/Meet the Teachers

 

Weekend Educational Course

MR Properties of Tissue (Afternoon)

Organizers: Mina Kim, Ph.D. & Claudia A. Wheeler-Kingshott, Ph.D.

Room 212-213 14:00-18:15            Moderators: Mina Kim, Ph.D. & Claudia A. Wheeler-Kingshott, Ph.D.

14:00           . Contributions to Relaxation Times & Diffusion

Gareth J. Barker, Ph.D.

 

14:30           . T1 Properties of Healthy & Diseased Tissue

Penny Anne Gowland, Ph.D.

 

15:00           . T2 Properties of Healthy & Diseased Tissue

Robert V. Mulkern, Jr., Ph.D.

 

15:30           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

16:00           . Susceptibility & T2*Contrast Mechanism

Chunlei Liu, Ph.D.

 

16:30           . Measuring Exchange & Compartmentalization

Itamer Ronen, Ph.D.

 

17:00           . Magnetization Transfer Properties of Tissue

Peter van Zijl, Ph.D.

 

17:30           . What Does the Future Hold?

John C. Gore, Ph.D.

 

18:00           . Adjournment/Meet the Teachers

 

Weekend Clinical Intensive Course

Advanced Neuroimaging 1

Organizers: Nadine J. Girard, M.D., Rakesh K. Gupta, M.D., Robia G. Pautler, Ph.D. & Maria A. Rocca, M.D.

Room 201 08:30-17:45            Moderators: Marco Essig, M.D., Ph.D. & Nadine J. Girard, M.D.

Ultra-High Field MRI 7T & Above

08:30           . What is Possible?

Mark E. Ladd, Ph.D.

 

09:05           . Specific Clinical Applications

Siegfried Trattnig, M.D.

 

09:40           . Safety & Challenges

Steffen Sammet, M.D., Ph.D.

 

10:15           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

Neuromodulation

10:30           . Electrical

Maxime Guy, M.D., Ph.D.

 

11:05           . Pharmacological

Robert L. Janiczek, Ph.D.

 

11:40           . Exercise Driven - The Will to Change

Maria A. Rocca, M.D.

 

12:15           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

Spinal Cord Imaging Methods Moderators: Rakesh K. Gupta, M.D. & Maria A. Rocca, M.D.

13:45           . Optimization

Kei Yamada, M.D.

 

14:20           . Advanced Techniques

Seth A. Smith, Ph.D.

 

14:55           . Post-Processing & Quantification

Ponnada A. Narayana, Ph.D.

 

15:30           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

Analysis Methods - Quantification & Standardization

15:45           . Quantitative fMRI

Peter van Zijl, Ph.D.

 

16:20           . Quantitative Measurements of Iron

E. Mark Haacke, Ph.D.

 

16:55           . Clinical Morphometry

Graeme D. Jackson, M.D., F.R.A.C.P.

 

17:30           . Adjournment/Meet the Teachers

 

Weekend Educational Course

MR Systems Engineering

Organizers: Richard W. Bowtell, Ph.D. & Michael S. Poole, Ph.D.

Room 219-220 08:30-17:15            Moderators: Richard W. Bowtell, Ph.D. & Michael S. Poole, Ph.D.

System Overview & Magnets

08:30           . Overview of the MRI System

Paul R. Harvey, Ph.D.

 

09:00           . Magnets: Theory

Darren Houlden, C.Phys., M.Inst.P., B.Sc.

 

09:30           . Magnets: Reality

Simon J. Calvert

 

10:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

Shims & Gradients

10:30           . Shimming: Fields, Coils & Control

Christoph Juchem, Ph.D.

 

11:00           . Gradient Coils: EM, Heating & Mechanical

Michael S. Poole, Ph.D.

 

11:30           . Gradient Amplifiers: Power & Control

Juan A. Sabate, Ph.D.

 

12:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

Devices in the Scanner & Low Frequency Interactions

13:30           . Overview of Device Interactions

Gregor Schaefers, Dipl.Ing. (FH)

 

14:00           . kHz (Gradient) Interactions

Paul M. Glover, Ph.D.

 

14:30           . Modeling Low Frequency Interactions

Stuart R. Crozier, Ph.D., D.Eng.

 

15:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

RF Electronics

15:30           . RF Power Amps: Introduction

Greig C. Scott, Ph.D.

 

16:00           . RF Preamps

Stephan Biber, Ph.D.

 

16:30           . Console Electronics

Pascal P. Stang, M.Sc.

 

17:00           . Adjournment/Meet the Teachers

 

Weekend Educational Course

MR Physics for Physicists

Organizers: Michael H. Buonocore, M.D., Ph.D., John P. Mugler, III, Ph.D. & Jürgen R. Reichenbach, Ph.D.

Room 202 08:30-18:15            Moderators: Michael H. Buonocore, M.D., Ph.D., John P. Mugler, III, Ph.D. & Jürgen R. Reichenbach, Ph.D.

Spins & Magnetization

08:30           . Quantum Mechanical Descriptions of the Spin - RF Coil Interaction

Frank Engelke, Ph.D.

 

09:00           . Spin Density Formalism & Its Use in MRS

Kevin W. Waddell, Ph.D.

 

09:30           . Signal Pathways & Applications in Pulse Sequence Development

Reed F. Busse, Ph.D.

 

10:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

Imaging Equations

10:30           . Transverse Magnetization Manipulation in GRE Sequences

Yuval Zur, Ph.D.

 

11:00           . Efficient Chemical Shift Exploitation Including Fat/Water Separation

Arend Heerschap, Ph.D.

 

11:30           . Theory & Practice in 2D-NMR Spectroscopic Imaging

Christoph Juchem, Ph.D.

 

12:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

Contrast Generation

13:30           . Balanced SSFP & Modifications for Unique Contrast

Karla L. Miller, Ph.D.

 

14:00           . Phase Contrast to Probe Tissue Composition & Structure

Dmitriy A. Yablonskiy, Ph.D.

 

14:30           . Quantification of MT Effects & Quantitative MT Imaging

John G. Sled, Ph.D.

 

15:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

15:30           . Quantification of Temperature Change with MRI

Baudouin Denis de Senneville, Ph.D.

 

Imaging Physics

16:00           . Theory & Practice of Imaging Near Metal Implants

Michael Carl, Ph.D.

 

16:30           . Novel Methods & Models for B1 Mapping

Hans-Peter Fautz, Ph.D.

 

17:00           . Field/Tissue Interactions in MRI: Simulating Effects on Signal, Noise, Safety & Artifacts

Christoper M. Collins, Ph.D.

 

17:30           . Electrical Conductivity Imaging

R. Todd Constable, Ph.D.

 

18:00           . Adjournment/Meet the Teachers

 

Weekend Clinical Intensive Course

Musculoskeletal MRI: Imaging Following Surgical Repair

Organizers: Christine Chung, M.D. & Bernard J. Dardzinski, Ph.D.

Room 109-110 08:30-16:45            Moderators: Hollis G. Potter, M.D. & Siegfried Trattnig, M.D.

08:30           . Clinical Assessment: Cartilage Repair (Clinical Issues/Surgical Options & Limitations)

Constance R. Chu, M.D.

 

09:00           . Microfracture/Marrow Stimulation Techniques

Jung-Ah Choi, M.D.

 

09:30           . Osteochondral Transfer: Autograft, Allograft & Scaffolds

Hollis G. Potter, M.D.

 

10:00           . Cell-Based Techniques: ACI & MACI

Siegfried Trattnig, M.D.

 

10:30           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

11:00           . Post-Operative Shoulder - Clinical Assessment & Strategies

Constance R. Chu, M.D.

 

11:30           . Post-Operative Imaging of the Rotator Cuff

Lynne S. Steinbach, M.D.

 

12:00           . Post-Operative Imaging of Glenohumeral Instability

Lynne S. Steinbach, M.D.

 

12:30           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

14:30           . Post-Operative Meniscus - Clinical Evaluation

Constance R. Chu, M.D.

 

15:00           . Post-Operative Meniscus - Imaging

Russell C. Fritz, M.D.

 

15:30           . Post-Operative Ligament - Clinical Evaluation

Constance R. Chu, M.D.

 

16:00           . Post-Operative Ligament - Imaging

Richard Kijowski, M.D.

 

16:30           . Adjournment/Meet the Teachers

 

Weekend Educational Course Case-Based Teaching

Clinical MR of Cancer: Solving Problems in Cancer Patients

Organizers: Anwar R. Padhani, M.D., M.R.C.P., F.R.C.R. & Shih-Chang Wang, F.R.A.N.Z.C.R., F.A.M.S., M.B.B.S.

Room 105-106 08:30-17:45            Moderators: Anwar R. Padhani, M.D., M.R.C.P., F.R.C.R. & Shih-Chang Wang, F.R.A.N.Z.C.R., F.A.M.S., M.B.B.S.

08:30           . Pseudoprogression & Psuedoregression

Alberto Bizzi, M.D.

 

09:00           . Tumor versus Non-Tumor

Meng Law, M.D., M.B.B.S., F.R.A.C.R.

 

09:30           . Isolated Cranial Nerve Palsy

Vincent F. Chong, M.D., F.R.C.R.

 

 

10:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

10:30           . Head & Neck Cancers: Distinguishing Recurrence from Scarring

Ann D. King, M.D.

 

11:00           . Staging Cancer in the Dense Breast

Elizabeth A. Morris, M.D.

 

11:30           . Renal Mass Characterization

Bachir Taouli, M.D.

 

12:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

13:30           . The Difficult Liver Lesion

Jeong Min Lee, M.D.

 

14:00           . Assessing the Liver After Interventional & Surgical Cancer Therapy

Shih-Chang Wang, F.R.A.N.Z.C.R., F.A.M.S., M.B.B.S.

 

14:30           . Pancreas: Cancer versus Inflammation

Riccardo Manfredi, M.D., M.B.A.

 

15:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

15:30           . Uterus - Gauging Depth of Invasion of Cancer

Evis Sala, M.D., Ph.D., F.R.C.R.

 

16:00           . Prostate Cancer: Defining Low Risk Disease for Active Surveillance

Masoom A. Haider, M.D., F.R.C.P.C.

 

16:30           . Bone Marrow Metastases - Assessing Response to Therapy

Anwar R. Padhani, M.D., M.R.C.P., F.R.C.R.

 

17:00           . Bone & Soft Tissue Sarcomas - Response Assessments Prior to Surgery

David M. Panicek, M.D.

 

17:30           . Adjournment /Meet the Teachers

 

Weekend Educational Course

Everything You Wanted to Know About Contrast Agents (Morning)

Organizers: Roland Bammer, Ph.D. & Bachir Taouli, M.D.

Room 203-204 08:00-12:35            Moderators: Roland Bammer, Ph.D. & Bachir Taouli, M.D.

08:00           . Contrast Agents 101: How Do Gd, Dy, Mn, Iron Particles & the Structure/Size of the Chelate alter Relaxation Times?

Val M. Runge, M.D.

 

08:20           . A Mole for the Moles: How to Compute Dose & Other Stuff You Missed in High School

Joel R. Garbow, Ph.D.

 

08:40           . Is Your Agent Charge-Neutral, Linear, Cyclic or Albuminbinding? - All You Wanted to Know about Chelates, Macromolecules & their Differences

Henrik S. Thomsen, M.D.

 

09:00           . All I Need to Know about Contrast Safety: Dissociation, Transmetalation, Renal Excretion/Insufficiency, Toxicity & Reporting Incidences

Martn R. Prince, M.D., Ph.D.

 

09:20           . Why Is It so Darn Difficult to Get More Imaging Drugs? -- A Glimpse on Approval, Trials, Costs, Safety, Generics & PMA

Sunder S. Rajan, Ph.D.

 

09:40           . Tracer Kinetics: Understand Your Own Model without Breaking Out those Scary Differential Equations

Steven P. Sourbron, Ph.D.

 

10:00           . The Irons in Your Fire: Iron Oxide Particles & Paramagnetic Nanoparticles

Gregory M. Lanza, M.D., Ph.D.

 

10:20           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

11:00           . Cellular Labeling: Transfection Mechanisms & MR Reporter Genes

Jeff W. M. Bulte, Ph.D.

 

11:20           . CEST Agents & pH Sensitive Probes: How Do They Work & What's Their Potential

A. Dean Sherry, Ph.D.

 

11:40           . MEMRI & Responsive Agents

Alan P. Koretsky, Ph.D.

 

12:00           . Build Your Own C13 Shack: An Absolute Beginner's Guide to (Pre)Clinical Hyperpolarized Agents

Daniel M. Spielman, Ph.D.

 

12:20           . Adjournment /Meet the Teachers

 

Weekend Educational Course

Emerging Techniques: Clinical vs. Research (Afternoon)

Organizers: Pratik Mukherjee, M.D., Ph.D. & Maxim Zaitsev, Ph.D.

Room 203-204 14:00-17:45            Moderators: Pratik Mukherjee, M.D., Ph.D. & Maxim Zaitsev, Ph.D.

14:00           . Traveling Wave MRI

David O. Brunner, Ph.D.

 

14:30           . Magnetic Particle Imaging

Bernhard Gleich

 

15:00           . Magnetic Source Imaging

Leighton Hinkley, Ph.D.

 

15:30           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

16:00           . MRI Guided Therapy

Garnette R. Sutherland, M.D., F.R.C.S.(C)

 

16:30           . Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping

Tian Liu, M.Sc.

 

17:00           . Integrated MRI/PET

Harald H. Quick, Ph.D.

 

17:30           . Adjournment /Meet the Teachers

 

Weekend Educational Course

Recent Advances in Cardiovascular MR: Techniques & Applications

Organizers: Tim Leiner, M.D., Ph.D., Thoralf Niendorf, Ph.D. & David E. Sosnovik, M.D.

Room 210-211 08:30-18:00            Moderators: Thoralf Niendorf, Ph.D.

08:00            Introduction to Today’s Program

Recent Developments in Hard- & Software Relevant to CMR

08:05           . New Developments in MR Hardware

Michael Schär, Ph.D.

 

08:25           . New Sequences & Techniques

Krishna S. Nayak, Ph.D.

 

08:45           . Parallel Acquisition & Compressed Sensing

Sebastian Kozerke, Ph.D.

 

Evaluation of Cardiac Function

09:05           . The Evaluation of Cardiac Function - Unmet Needs

Thomas H. Marwick, M.D., Ph.D.

 

09:25           . Techniques to Image Cardiac Function

Alistair A. Young, Ph.D.

 

09:45           . Research Promises: What Can We Expect in the Future?

Nael F. Osman, Ph.D.

 

10:05           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

Evaluation of Cardiac Perfusion

10:20           . Clinical Needs: What Do We Want to See?

Jeremy D. Collins, M.D.

 

10:40           . Technical Foundations: How is It Done?

Michael Jerosch-Herold, Ph.D.

 

11:00           . Research Promises: What Can We Expect in the Future?

Craig Meyer, Ph.D.

 

Myocardial Tissue Characterization

11:20           . Clinical Needs: What Do We Want to See?

Juerg Schwitter, M.D., F.E.S.C.

 

11:40           . Technical Foundations: How is It Done?

Orlando P. Simonetti, Ph.D.

 

12:00           . Research Promises: What Can We Expect in the Future?

David E. Sosnovik, M.D.

 

12:20           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

 

Evaluation of Flow Moderators: Tim Leiner, M.D., Ph.D. & David E. Sosnovik, M.D.

13:30           . Clinical Needs: What Do We Want to See?

Michael D. Hope, M.D.

 

13:50           . Technical Foundations: How is It Done?

Frank R. Korosec, Ph.D.

 

14:10           . Research Promises: What Can We Expect in the Future?

Oliver Wieben, Ph.D.

 

3T Cardiac MRI: Tricks, Treats & Traps

14:30           . Cardiac MRI at 3T - Challenges & Technical Solutions

Tobias R. Schaeffter, Ph.D.

 

15:00           . Migrating to 3T: Issues & Clinical Benefits

Bernd J. Wintersperger, M.D.

 

15:30           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

CMR in Clinical Trials

15:45           . The Value of CMR Over Other Modalities in Clinical Trials

Chun Yuan, Ph.D.

 

16:05           . Prognostic Value of CMR Versus Traditional Risk Factors

David A. Bluemke, M.D., Ph.D.

 

16:25           . What are the Most Pressing Questions in Need of Trials?

Victor Ferrari, M.D., Ph.D.

 

Magnetic Resonance Angiography

16:45           . Goodbye to Gad: State-of-the-Art NCE-MRA

Vivian S. Lee, M.D., Ph.D., M.B.A.

 

17:05           . Not So Fast: Recent Advances in CE-MRA

Tim Leiner, M.D., Ph.D.

 

17:25           . The Best of Both Worlds: The Role of Both Techniques in Clinical Practice

Jeffrey H. Maki, M.D., Ph.D.

 

17:45           . Adjournment /Meet the Teachers

 

Weekend Educational Course

Microstructural Imaging Techniques in the Brain (Morning)

Organizers: Daniel C. Alexander, Ph.D. & Geoffrey J. M. Parker, Ph.D.

Room 212-213 08:00-12:15            Moderators: Daniel C. Alexander, Ph.D. & Geoffrey J. M. Parker, Ph.D.

08:00           . Scene Setting & Motivation

Christian Beaulieu, Ph.D.

 

08:30           . What Contrasts Can We Use to Probe Microstructure?

Mark D. Does, Ph.D.

 

09:00           . qMT

Mara Cercignani, Ph.D.

 

09:30           . Relaxivity Measurements

Alex L. MacKay, Ph.D.

 

10:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

10:30           . Diffusion Acquisitions for Microstructure

Tim B. Dyrby, Ph.D.

 

11:00           . Modeling of Diffusion MRI

Victor Sheng-Kwei Song, Ph.D.

 

11:30           . Impact on Neuroscience

Christopher D. Kroenke, Ph.D.

 

12:00           . Adjournment /Meet the Teachers

 

Weekend Educational Course

Functional Connectivity of the Brain (Afternoon)

Organizers: Xiaoping P. Hu, Ph.D. & Fa-Hsuan Lin, Ph.D.

Room 212-213 13:30-17:45            Moderators: Xiaoping P. Hu, Ph.D. & Fa-Hsuan Lin, Ph.D.

13:30           . Neurophysiological Basis of Connectivity

Michael Breakspear, Ph.D., M.B.B.S.

 

14:00           . Structural Equation Modeling

Stephen C. Strother, Ph.D.

 

14:30           . Casual Modeling

Alard F. Roebroeck, Ph.D.

 

15:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

15:30           . Pre-Processing

Catherine E. Chang, Ph.D.

 

16:00           . Seed & ICA Analyses

James J. Pekar, Ph.D.

 

16:30           . Validation & Correlation

Amir Shmuel, Ph.D.

 

17:00           . Connectivity in Practice

Michael P. Milham, M.D., Ph.D.

 

17:30           . Adjournment/Meet the Teachers

 

Weekend Clinical Intensive Course

Advanced Neuroimaging 2

Organizers: Nadine J. Girard, M.D., Rakesh K. Gupta, M.D., Robia G. Pautler, Ph.D. & Maria A. Rocca, M.D.

Room 201 08:30-17:15            Moderators: Nadine J. Girard, M.D. & Rakesh K. Gupta, M.D.

Spinal Cord Imaging in the Clinic

08:30           . Spinal Trauma

Paul M. Parizel, M.D., Ph.D.

 

09:00           . Transverse Myelitis

Pramit M. Phal, M.D.

 

09:30           . Spinal Cord Masses - Tumor & Infections

Roger Siemund, M.D., Ph.D.

 

10:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

Comatous Emergencies Beyond Stroke

10:30           . Animal Models of Encephalitis

Afonso C. Silva, Ph.D.

 

11:00           . Neuroimaging in Comatous Emergencies

C. C. Tchoyoson Lim, M.D., M.B.B.S.

 

11:30           . Toxic Encephalopathy

Pia C. Maly Sundgren, M.D., Ph.D.

 

12:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

Imaging of Brain Masses Moderators: Pia C. Maly Sundgren, M.D., Ph.D. & Stefan Sunaert, M.D., Ph.D.

13:30           . Tumor & Tumor Mimics

Rajan Jain, M.D.

 

14:00           . Tumor Subtyping

Meng Law, M.D., M.B.B.S., F.R.A.C.R.

 

14:30           . Brain Tumor Microstructure

Alan Jackson, Ph.D.

 

15:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

15:30           . Animal Models

Marco Essig, M.D., Ph.D.

 

16:00           . Animal Models

John D. Hazle, Ph.D.

 

16:30           . High Field Imaging of Brain Tumors

Johannes T. Heverhagen, M.D., Ph.D.

 

17:00           . Adjournment/Meet the Teachers

 

Weekend Educational Course

RF Engineering

Organizer: Tamer S. Ibrahim, Ph.D.

Room 219-220 08:30-16:45            Moderators: Tamer S. Ibrahim, Ph.D. & Dennis Klomp, Ph.D.

RF Basics

08:30           . Circuit & Transmission Lines

Scott B. King, Ph.D.

 

09:00           . Volume & Surface Coils

Gregor Adriany, Ph.D.

 

09:30           . Multi-Tuned Coils

Dennis W. J. Klomp, Ph.D.

 

10:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

RF Arrays

10:30           . Receive Arrays

Graham C. Wiggins, D.Phil.

 

11:00           . Transmit Arrays

Tamer S. Ibrahim, Ph.D.

 

11:30           . RF Modeling

Christopher M. Collins, Ph.D.

 

12:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

RF Interference with Other Devices

13:30           . Implantable Devices

Ross D. Venook, Ph.D.

 

14:00           . EEG NIR PET

Louis Lemieux, Ph.D.

 

14:30           . ECG

Thoralf Niendorf, Ph.D.

 

15:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

Live Construction of Coils

15:30           . Constructing of an MRI Coil

Hiroyuki Fujita, Ph.D.

 

16:30           . Adjournment/Meet the Teachers

 

Weekend Educational Course

Imaging Strategies

Organizers: David O. Brunner, Ph.D., Craig H. Meyer, Ph.D. & John P. Mugler, III, Ph.D.

Room 202 08:30-17:15            Moderators: David O. Brunner, Ph.D., Craig H. Meyer, Ph.D. & John P. Mugler, III, Ph.D.

General Pulse-Sequence Strategies

08:30           . Echo-Train Sequences: EPI, RARE & Beyond

David C. Alsop, Ph.D.

 

09:00           . Spoiled & Balanced Gradient-Echo Methods

Oliver Bieri, Ph.D.

 

09:30           . Contrast Manipulation using Magnetization Preparation

Daniel A. Herzka, Ph.D.

 

10:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

RF Pulses & Motion

10:30           . RF-Pulse Toolkit: Application Specific Design

William A. Grissom, Ph.D.

 

11:00           . Motion-Sensitized MR: Arterial Spin Labeling & Diffusion

Richard B. Buxton, Ph.D.

 

11:30           . Motion Compensation Strategies

Himanshu Bhat, Ph.D.

 

12:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

Tools for Rapid Imaging

13:30           . Acceleration Through Alternate Trajectories

James G. Pipe, Ph.D.

 

14:00           . Parallel Imaging: Principles & Implementation

Nicole E. Seiberlich, Ph.D.

 

14:30           . Reconstruction Methods for Undersampled Data

Claudia del Carmen Prieto, Ph.D.

 

15:00           . Break/Meet the Teachers

 

Imaging Beyond Morphology

15:30           . Temporal & Parametric Undersampling Strategies

Sebastian Kozerke, Ph.D.

 

16:00           . MR Parameter Mapping & Quantitative Imaging

Sean C. L. Deoni, Ph.D.

 

16:30           . Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Perfusion

Christopher C. Quarles, Ph.D.

 

17:00           . Adjournment/Meet the Teachers

 

 

Plenary Session

Plenary Hall 07:30-10:15           

07:30           . Welcome & Awards

Debiao Li, Ph.D., 2011-12 ISMRM President

 

08:20           . Lauterbur Lecture: MRI: From Science to Society

Vivian S. Lee, M.D., Ph.D., M.B.A.

 

NIBIB Plenary Session on Innovations in Imaging: How Compressed Sensing will Change the World of MR

Organizers: Craig H. Meyer, Ph.D. & Daniel K. Sodickson, M.D., Ph.D.

09:05           0001.. Compressed Sensing Overview

David Donoho1

1Renaissance Technologie, Setauket, NY, United States

 

09:30           0002.. Compressed Sensing in MRI

Michael Lustig1

1University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, United States

Compressed sensing is a technique that can be used to significantly accelerate the acquisition of MR Imaging. It exploits the fact that medical images, much like natural images taken with digital cameras can be compressed many folds. This is information is used to reconstruct images from vastly undersampled data. In recent years, Compressed sensing has been gaining much interest in the field of MR. This talk will provide an overview of the basics behind compressed sensing in the context of MR imaging, and review the current status and trends in clinical applications.

 

09:55           0003.. Clinical Applications of Compressed Sensing: Introduction: Clinical Opportunities & Barriers to Mainstream Use

Shreyas S. Vasanawala1

1Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States

Compressed sensing potentially offers faster and higher resolution MRI. The most promising applications of compressed sensing are those that are currently difficult due to long scan times (imaging moving structures or intravenous contrast, acquiring high dimensional datasets). While compressed sensing MRI has had rapid technical development, and some studies have been performed on phantoms, animals and volunteers, deployment in the clinic to date has been more limited. The current barriers to clinical use include long image reconstruction times and paucity of clinical validation studies.

 

10:05           0004.. Case 1: Sparse Neuroangiogram

Manal Nicolas-Jilwan1

1University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, United States

 

10:10           0005.. Case 2: High Spatiotemporal Correlation Cardiac Imaging

Jeanette Schulz-Menger1

1Charite-University/HELIOS, Berlin, Germany

 

10:15            Adjournment

 

Clinical Intensive Course

MRI of the Foot & Ankle

Organizers: Christine Chung, M.D. & Hollis G. Potter, M.D.

Room 202 08:15-10:15            Moderators: Christine Chung, M.D. & James M. Linklater, M.D., M.B.B.S.

08:15           . Ankle MRI

Julie A. Schatz, M.D.

 

08:55           . Midfoot/Forefoot MRI

James M. Linklater, M.D., M.B.B.S.

 

09:35           . High Resolution & uTE MRI

Christine Chung, M.D.

 

10:15           . Adjournment

 

Clinical Intensive Course

Stroke Recovery

Organizers: Pia C. Maly Sundgren, M.D., Ph.D. & John D. Port, M.D., Ph.D.

Room 201 08:20-10:15            Moderators: Alberto Bizzi, M.D. & Roger Siemund, Ph.D.

08:20           . Update on Stroke Imaging

Danielle Van Westen, M.D.

 

08:45           . Changes in Functional Connectivity Post Stroke

Stefan Sunaert, M.D., Ph.D.

 

09:10           . Changes in DTI Post Stroke

Sven E. Ekholm, M.D., Ph.D.

 

09:35           . Image-Guided Therapies & Rehabilitation

Paul M. Parizel, M.D., Ph.D.

 

10:00           . Discussion & Meet the Teachers

 

10:15 Adjournment

 

Clinical Intensive Course

Oncologic Pelvic Imaging

Organizers: Shahid M. Hussain, M.D., Caroline Reinhold, M.D. & Evis Sala, M.D., Ph.D., F.R.C.R.

Room 105-106 08:20-10:20            Moderators: Masoom A. Haider, M.D., F.R.C.P.C & Evis Sala, M.D., Ph.D., F.R.C.R.

08:20           . Prognostic Staging of Rectal Cancer- Implications of Treatment

Gina Brown, M.D., M.R.C.P., F.R.C.R.

 

08:55           . Staging Bladder Cancer: Role of MRI

Hebert A. Vargas, M.D.

 

09:30           . Current State & Future Perspectives of Lymph Node Imaging

Jelle O. Barentsz, M.D., Ph.D.

 

10:05           . Discussion

 

10:20 Adjournment

 

Traditional Poster Session: Cardiovascular

Exhibition Hall 10:45-12:45           

 

Electronic Poster Session: Engineering; fMRI

Exhibition Hall 10:45-12:45           

 

Study Group Session: Perfusion; Detection & Correction of Motion in MRI & MRS

Room 203-204 10:45-12:45           

 

Compressed Sensing: Novel Applications

Plenary Hall 10:45-12:45            Moderators: Craig H. Meyer & Krishna S. Nayak

10:45           0006.Compressed Sensing Multi-Spectral Imaging of the Post-Operative Spine

Pauline Wong Worters1, Kyunghyun Sung1, Kathryn J. Stevens1, Kevin M. Koch2, Brian A. Hargreaves1

1Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States; 2ASL, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI, United States

Multi-spectral imaging (MSI) methods such as MAVRIC, SEMAC and Hybrid have been developed in recent years to provide distortion-free MRI of tissue around metallic implants. However, acquisition times remain lengthy (5-15 minutes) and limit the achievable spatial resolution in routine clinical use. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility of using compressed sensing (CS) to reduce acquisition time in a retrospective application to patient data with spinal hardware. Results show that retrospective CS-MSI are the same as or better than the original MSI images. We also show that fully sampled MSI and prospectively undersampled T2-weighted CS-MSI (42% scan time reduction) are comparable in terms of image contrast and quality.

 

10:57           0007.A Combined Approach to Compressed Sensing & Parallel Imaging for Fat-Water Separation with R2* Estimation

Curtis N. Wiens1, Colin M. McCurdy2, 3, Charles A. McKenzie, 13

1Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada; 2Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada; 3Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada

R2*-corrected chemical shift based fat-water separation techniques have been used to accurately quantify fat. These are time-consuming and require image acceleration techniques. The following work describes a method of separating fat and water from undersampled multi-channel datasets. This method simultaneously applies compressed sensing, parallel imaging, and fat-water separation. To illustrate this technique, net acceleration factors of up to 4 are shown in the abdomen. Including the R2* term improves the accuracy of the fat-water separation. The proposed method improves image quality over sequential parallel imaging and fat-water separation at high acceleration factors.

 

11:09           0008.Accelerated Echo-Planar Correlated Spectroscopic Imaging in the Human Calf Muscle Using Compressed Sensing

Jon Furuyama1, Chris Roberts2, M. Albert Thomas1

1Radiology, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, United States; 2School of Nursing, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, United States

 

Recently, a four-dimensional Echo-Planar Correlated Spectroscopic Imaging (EP-COSI) sequence was shown to produce spatially localized two-dimensional spectra. Despite the speed improvements of the echo-planar readout, the sequence still requires significant scan time to collect all four dimensions. We show that the use of Compressed Sensing (CS) techniques can reconstruct under-sampled datasets with as little as 33% of the original data. Such a reduction in scan time allows for the deployment of 4D spectroscopic imaging sequences in a clinically feasible time frame. Examples of CS reconstruction are shown in the study of diabetes in the human calf muscle.

 

11:21           0009.Direct Diffusion Tensor Estimation Using Joint Sparsity Constraint Without Image Reconstruction

Yanjie Zhu1, 2, Yin Wu1, 2, Ed X. Wu3, 4, Leslie Ying5, Dong Liang1, 2

1Paul C. Lauterbur Research Centre for Biomedical Imaging, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China; 2Key Laboratory of Health Informatics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen, China; 3Laboratory of Biomedical Imaging and Signal Processing; 4Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong; 5Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, WI, Milwaukee, United States

The joint sparsity constraint is integrated into the model-based method to improve the accuracy of direct diffusion tensor estimation from highly undersampled k-space data. The method, named model-based method with joint sparsity constraint (MB-JSC), effectively incorporates the prior information on the joint sparsity of different diffusion weighted images in solving the nonlinear equation of tensors. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is able to estimate the diffusion tensors more accurately than the existing method when a high net reduction factor is used.

 

11:33           0010.Highly Accelerated Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Imaging with Prospective Undersampling

R. Marc Lebel1, Jesse Jones2, Jean-Christophe Ferré2, Samuel Valencerina2, Krishna S. Nayak1, Meng Law2

1Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States; 2Department of Radiology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States

Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging requires high spatial and temporal resolution and large volume coverage; traditionally, these are mutually exclusive. We present prospective undersampled DCE imaging of brain tumors with high spatiotemporal resolution using l1-SPIRiT (compressed sensing and parallel imaging). We employ multiple spatial and temporal reconstruction constraints, including a novel temporal constraint that promotes low frequency signal changes, to achieve high accelerations without compromising resolution or dynamic information.

 

11:45           0011.Joint Reconstruction of Under-Sampled Multiple Contrast Images Using Mutual Information

Eric Wong1

1Radiology/Psychiatry, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States

In clinical MRI, images are often acquired of the same anatomy with multiple forms of contrast. Mutual information has long been used as a criterion for aligning images with different contrast, as it is high for any pair of aligned images. We explore here the maximization of mutual information as a criterion in the joint reconstruction of pairs of under-sampled images with different contrasts. For T1 and T2 weighted images that were under-sampled by a factor of 1.9, maximizing mutual information resulted in excellent reconstructions in less than one second of reconstruction time.

 

11:57           0012.High-Frame-Rate Multislice Speech Imaging with Sparse Samping of (K,t)-Space

Maojing Fu1, 2, Anthony G. Christodoulou1, 2, Andrew T. Naber3, David P. Kuehn4, Zhi-Pei Liang1, 2, Bradley P. Sutton, 23

1Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, United States; 2Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, Urbana, IL, United States; 3Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, United States; 4Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, United States

Dynamic MRI can provide a valuable tool to quantitatively assess changes in oropharyngeal dynamics during speech. In this work we present 5-slice dynamic speech imaging at a frame rate of 20 fps with 2.2 mm × 2.2 mm × 8.0 mm spatial resolution. It was successfully performed by incorporating parallel imaging methods, a composite spiral / Cartesian sampling strategy, and a reconstruction scheme exploiting the partial separability and the spatial-spectral sparsity of the speech image sequence. Changing tongue shape is observed over a speech sample in volunteer subjects.

 

12:09           0013.An Application of Regularization by Model Consistency Condition to Accelerated Contrast-Enhanced Angiography

Julia V. Velikina1, Alexey A. Samsonov2

1Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI, United States; 2Radiology, University of Wisconsin - Madison

A novel regularization by a model consistency condition is adapted for application in time-resolved contrast-enhanced intracranial angiography. The temporal behavior model is learned from low resolution training data by principal component analysis. The proposed method is shown to distinguish different filling patterns of healthy and pathological vasculature.

 

12:21           0014.Continuous Table Movement MRI in a Single Breath-Hold: Highly Undersampled Radial Acquisitions with Nonlinear Iterative Reconstruction & Joint Coil Estimation

Michael O. Zenge1, Martin Uecker2, 3, Gerald Mattauch1, Jens Frahm2

1Healthcare Sector, Siemens AG, Erlangen, Germany; 2Biomedizinische NMR Forschungs GmbH am Max-Planck-Institut für biophysikalische Chemie, Göttingen, Germany; 3Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of California, Berkeley, United States

Continuous table movement MRI is an emerging technique for a variety of clinical applications. The achievable acceleration with parallel imaging, however, is not yet sufficient to scan an extended FOV in a single breath-hold. Radial scanning in combination with innovative iterative image reconstruction and joint coil estimation promises significantly higher acceleration factors. This method was implemented for moving table abdominal MRI in a single breath-hold and was evaluated in 5 healthy volunteers. It was proven that highly undersampled radial images can be reconstructed with very little streaking artifacts which justifies further investigation in volunteers and patients.

 

12:33           0015.T1 Map Reconstruction from Under-Sampled KSpace Data Using a Similarity Constraint

Mohammad H. Kayvanrad1, A. Jonathan McLeod1, John S. H. Baxter1, Charles A. McKenzie1, Terry M. Peters1

1Robarts Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada

The similarity between images, in problems involving multiple acquisitions with different imaging parameters, is used as an additional reconstruction constraint beside sparity to further increase the quality of reconstruction/k-space under-sampling. This is of particular interest in reconstruction of T1/T2 maps. From a clinical perspective, this means a reduction in acquisition time.

 

Animal Models of Brain Disease

Room 201 10:45-12:45            Moderators: Eric T. Ahrens & Shella D. Keilholz

10:45           0016.Measurement of Metabolite Concentration Changes in the Rat Barrel Cortex During Sustained Trigeminal Stimulation

Nathalie Just1, Rolf Gruetter1, 2

1LIFMET, CIBM/EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland; 2Department of Radiology, Universities of Lausanne and Geneva, Switzerland

Oxidative metabolism is considered to be the primary mechanism to fulfill the brain’s energetic demands both at rest and during activation. In the present work, functional MR spectroscopy was performed in a rat model during prolonged stimulation and rest. Timecourses of metabolite concentrations demonstrated significant positive changes for [Lactate] and [Glutamate] during sustained barrel cortex activation relative to rest while [Glucose] and [Aspartate] diminished in line with previous studies in humans. For the first time, the dynamics of metabolite concentration during sustained somatosensory activation in the rats using fMRS were evaluated.

 

10:57           0017.Mapping the Living Mouse Brain Neural Architecture: Strain Specific Patterns of the Brain Connectional Anatomy

Laura-Adela Harsan1, Marco Reisert1, Annette Merkle1, Jürgen Hennig1, Dominik von Elverfeldt1

1Medical Physics, Department of Radiology, University Medical Center, Freiburg, Germany

In the present study we probe at microscopic level, the ensemble of anatomical neurocircuity of the living mouse brain, using diffusion fiber tracking, comparatively in BALB/cJ and C57Bl6/N mice. Exquisite brain anatomical details of the mouse brain neural architecture were revealed by combining the use of Cryoprobe technology for MRI data acquisition and a new global fiber tracking algorithm for post-processing. We depicted inter- and intra-strain variations in the general wiring scheme of the mouse brain. As a prominent feature, BALB/cJ mice show great within-strain variations in the callosal interhemispheric connectivity.

 

11:09                     0018.Alterations in Brain Development Induced by Whole-Brain Irradiation in Young Mice

SUMMA25Lisa M. Gazdzinski1, Kyle Cormier1, C Shun Wong2, 3, Jason P. Lerch1, Brian J. Nieman1

1Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 2Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 3Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Cranial radiotherapy for the treatment of childhood cancer has been implicated in the development of progressive neurocognitive dysfunction, but the mechanism remains poorly understood. Using longitudinal in vivo MRI, this study identified regions of the developing mouse brain most sensitive to irradiation at a young age. Irradiation led to bilateral decreases in growth rate and volume in both white and gray matter regions. The time course varied among brain structures and apparent recovery was observed in a subset of structures. The systematic approach used in this work will serve as a valuable tool for investigating neuroprotective strategies to mitigate neurocognitive late effects.

 

11:21                     0019.Evidence of the Myelin Origin of the Short T2* Component in White Matter: A Combined Magnetization Transfer & T2* Relaxometry Experiment in the Marmoset Brain at 7T

SUMMA25Pascal Sati1, Peter Van Gelderen2, Afonso C. Silva3, Hellmut Merkle, Daniel S. Reich1, Jeff H. Duyn2

1Translational Neuroradiology Unit, Neuroimmunology Branch, NINDS, NIH, Bethesda, MD, United States; 2Advanced MRI Section, Laboratory of Functional and Molecular Imaging, NINDS, NIH, Bethesda, MD, United States; 3Cerebral Microcirculation Unit, Laboratory of Functional and Molecular Imaging, NINDS, NIH, Bethesda, MD, United States

 

Recent gradient-echo studies suggest a multi-component T2* decay in white matter (WM) fibers of human brain with the existence of a short component (few ms) tentatively attributed to water protons trapped inside myelin. In this study, we performed a combined magnetization transfer and T2* relaxometry experiment at 7T in marmoset brain. We found that short T2* component in WM experienced an MT effect with a dependence on the delay time between MT pulse and multi-gradient echo acquisition that is distinctly different from that of other water compartments, reflecting the restricted exchange probably occurring between the various water pools in WM.

 

11:33                     0020.In Vivo Hydrogen-1, Sodium-23, Phosphorus-31, and Potassium-39 Magnetic Resonance Imaging After Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion

SUMMA25Friedrich Wetterling1, Nagesh Shanbhag2, Lothar Schilling2, Stefan Kirsch1, Lothar Rudi Schad1

1Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany; 2Division of Neurosurgical Reasearch, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany

In the current feasibility study, four single-tuned surface resonators for Hydrogen-1 (1H), Sodium-23 (23Na), Phosphorus-31 (31P), and Potassium-39 (39K) MRI were used in conjunction with a linearly-polarized 1H-volume resonator to examine in vivo brain tissue after induction of focal ischaemia. The 1H-Apparent diffusion coefficient, as well as the relaxation time weighted 1H-, 23Na-, 31P, and 39K-signals were analysed and expressed as a percentage change compared to contralateral normal tissue. We conclude that multi-parameter X-nuclei MRI at 9.4T provides a promising tool to study metabolic and ion concentration changes after cerebral artery occlusion non-invasively with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution.

 

11:45           0021.Longitudinal MRI Assessment of Brain Microstructural Changes Induced by Chronic Toxoplasma Gondii Infection in Mice

SUMMA25Alexandru Parlog1, 2, Marco Reisert1, Dominik von Elverfeldt1, Ildiko Dunay2, Laura-Adela Harsan1

1Department of Radiology, University Medical Center, Freiburg, Germany; 2Institute for Medical Microbiology, Uniklinik Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany

In the present study we provide longitudinal insight into the pathological effects of the T. gondii infection on the mouse brain microstructure. We explore the use of DT-MRI and fiber tracking to investigate the impact of the T. gondii infection on the whole brain connectivity pattern, in the living mouse. MR images illustrate the presence of lesions in key brain structures leading to impaired structural connectivity between important areas of the somatosensory and limbic systems. These modifications might explain the sensorimotor deficits observed in the infected mice.

 

11:57           0022.Hyperpolarized 13C Ascorbates in the Anesthetized Rat Brain

David M. Wilson1, John Kurhanewicz1, Kayvan R. Keshari1

1Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), San Francisco, CA, United States

The reducing agents glutathione and Vitamin C are maintained at high concentrations in the brain, and have a critical role in dealing with reactive oxygen species seen as culprits in aging, neurodegenerative disease, and ischemic injury. We have developed [1-13C] dehydroascorbate, the oxidized form of Vitamin C, as a redox sensor for in vivo imaging using hyperpolarized 13C spectroscopy. In anesthetized rats, hyperpolarized [1-13C] DHA was rapidly converted to [1-13C] Vitamin C within the brain. In contrast, hyperpolarized [1-13C] Vitamin C studies demonstrated no observable oxidation to [1-13C] DHA, with diminished signals in brain voxels consistent with limited blood-brain-barrier penetration.

 

12:09           0023.19F/1H MRI of Brain Inflammation in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

Helmar Waiczies1, 2, Stefano Lepore1, 2, Jason M. Millward3, 4, Bettina Purfürst5, Thoralf Niendorf, 23, Sonia Waiczies1, 2

1Ultrahigh Field Imaging in Neuroinflammation, Experimental and Clinical Research Center (ECRC), a cooperation of the Charité Medical Faculty and the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Deutschland, Germany; 2Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Deutschland, Germany; 3Experimental and Clinical Research Center (ECRC), Charité University Medicine Campus Berlin Buch, Berlin, Deutschland, Germany; 4Experimental Neuroimmunology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, , Berlin, Germany; 5Electron Microscopy, Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany

In the present study we employed an animal model of MS, the Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE) to explore the in vivo uptake of fluorine (19F) nanoparticles by inflammatory cells during encephalomyleitis. Using a 32-leg 1H/19F birdcage coil dedicated for mouse head imaging, we detected and quantified 19F nanoparticles (containing perfluoro-15-crown-5-ether) taken up and transported by macrophages within the cerebellum following intravenous application. The application of 19F nanoparticles for imaging immune cells in conditions such as encephalomyelitis is an emerging field that will be ideal to study the kinetics of immune cell localization during the development of inflammation.

 

12:21           0024.Reduction of Brain Virus by Minocycline and Combination Anti-Retroviral Therapy Produces Neuronal Protection in a Primate Model of AIDS

Eva-Maria Ratai1, 2, Robert J. Fell3, Julian He, 23, Michael Piatak4, Jeffrey D. Lifson5, Tricia H. Burdo6, Jennifer Campbell6, Patrick Autissier6, Lakshmanan Annamalai7, Eliezer Masliah8, Susan V. Westmoreland, 27, Kenneth C. Williams6, R Gilberto González, 23

1Neuroradiology Division, Department of Radiology , A. A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital , Charlestown, MA, United States; 2Harvard Medical School; 3Neuroradiology Division, Department of Radiology, A. A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, United States; 4SAIC Frederick, Inc., Frederick, MD, United States; 5SAIC Frederick, Inc., Frederick, MD, United States; 6Biology Department, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA, United States; 7Department of Pathology, New England Primate Research Center, Southborough, MA, United States; 8Department of Neurosciences, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States

MR spectroscopy was used to investigate the neuropathogenesis of HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND). Twenty-three simian immunodeficiency virus-infected, CD8- T-lymphocyte depleted rhesus macaques were studied. Antiretroviral therapy and minocycline were used to modulate their disease progression. Both treatments resulted in the decrease of viral RNA in the brain. Severity of neuronal damage measured by NAA/Cr was shown to be dependent on CNS viral levels. The degree of CNS viral infection was directly influenced by plasma viral load and infected/activated monocytes that traffic virus into the brain. These findings suggest monocyte-directed therapies for a future direction of HAND treatment.

 

12:33           0025.Characterization of Cerebrovascular Parameters Using MRI in ENOS & SGCα1 Knockout Mice

Ji-Yeon Suh1, Shunning Huang1, Dmitriy N. Atochin2, Paul L. Huang2, Emmanuel S. Buys3, Peter Brouckaert4, Jeong Kon Kim, 15, Woo Hyun Shim1, Seon Joo Kwon1, Young Ro Kim1

1Athinoula A, Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusettes General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, United States; 2Cardiology, MGH, Boston, MA, United States; 3Anesthesia, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, United States; 4VIB Department of Melecular Biomedical Research, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; 5Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan, Seoul, Korea, Republic of

Although constitutively produced eNOS and sGC are necessary enzymes for maintaining a normal endothelial function, cerebrovascular characters in the mouse brain lacking these enzymes have not been investigated. We aimed to characterize MRI-derived vascular parameters in eNOS and sGC knockout mice. Our results show an increased water exchange index (WEI) and a lower aquaporine expression in knockout mice, which imply the inherently weakened BBB function precluding the increased channel-mediated water exchange, This work provides a basis for elucidating the pathophysiological relationship between NO synthase and the BBB integrity, and its involvement with ischemic damage.

 

Functional Imaging of Neurodevelopmental & Neurodegenerative Disorders

Room 202 10:45-12:45            Moderators: Hanzhang Lu & James J. Pekar

10:45           0026.Disruption of Functional Organization Within the Primary Motor Cortex in Children with Autism

Mary Beth Nebel1, 2, Suresh E. Joel1, 2, John Muschelli1, 3, Anita D. Barber, 12, Brian S. Caffo3, James J. Pekar, 12, Stewart H. Mostofsky, 12

1Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, United States; 2Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States; 3Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, United States

Children with autism (ASD) experience difficulty performing motor skills, which may reflect abnormal connectivity within networks underlying motor control and learning. Motivated by the utility of clustering algorithms in visualizing functional organization within the brain, we present a parcellation of a key area of the motor network, the primary motor cortex (M1), in both typically developing (TD) children and children with ASD and introduce methods for selecting the number of clusters, matching clusters across groups and testing group differences. Observed group differences in M1 organization suggest that developmental segregation of upper and lower limb control may be delayed in ASD.

 

10:57           0027.Whole Brain Connectivity Analysis Using Resting State Functional MRI in Pediatric TSC Patients

Alireza Akhondi-Asl1, Arne Hans1, Benoit Scherrer2, Jurriaan M. Peters2, Simon K. Warfield2

1Computational Radiology Laboratory,, Children's Hospital, Harvard medical school, Boston, MA, United States; 2Computational Radiology Laboratory,, Children's Hospital, Harvard medical school, Boston, MA, United States

 

11:09           0028.Abnormal Emotional Processing in Multiple Sclerosis: An FMRI Investigation

Barbara Basile1, 2, Ugo Nocentini3, Carlo Caltagirone3, Marco Bozzali4

1Neuroimaging Laboratory, Santa Lucia Foundation, Rome , Italy; 2School of Cognitive Psychotherapy, Rome, Italy; 3Clinical and Behavioral Neurology, Santa Lucia Foundation, Rome, Italy; 4Neuroimaging Laboratory, Santa Lucia Foundation, Rome, Italy

 

Psychopathological symptoms like anger, depression and disphoria are frequently observed in patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS), but yet their neuronal substrate has been little investigated. The aim of this fMRI study was to assess the basis of abnormal emotional processing in MS, with a particular focus on anger and joy. We show that patients with MS activate more than healthy subjects when exposed to emotional stimuli (facial expressions), thus confirming the occurrence of an abnormal emotion processing. We suggest that these abnormalities might represent the neurobiological substrate for psychopathological symptoms.

 

11:21           0029.Resting State FMRI Helps to Understand the Pathophysiology of Sensory-Motor & Cognitive Disabilities in MS

Barbara Basile1, 2, Maura Castelli3, Fabrizia Monteleone3, Diego Centonze3, Carlo Caltagirone4, Marco Bozzali5

1Neuroimaging Laboratory, Santa Lucia Foundation, Rome , Italy, Italy; 2School of Cognitive Psychotherapy, Rome, Italy; 3Neuroscience, University of Rome "Tor Vergata", Rome, Italy; 4Clinical and Behavioral Neurology, Santa Lucia Foundation, Rome, Italy; 5Neuroimaging Laboratory, Santa Lucia Foundation, Rome, Italy

Resting-state fMRI was used here to investigate changes in functional connectivity (FC) within two critical networks, namely the sensory-motor and the default-mode-network, in patients with relapsing-remitting (RR-) and secondary-progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS). Overall, MS patients compared to healthy controls, revealed a compensatory increase of FC in both networks.

 

11:33           0030.Vessel-Reactivity-Corrected FMRI Reveals Novel Patterns of Age-Related Changes in Brain Activity

SUMMA25Peiying Liu1, Andrew C. Hebrank2, Karen M. Rodrigue2, Kristen M. Kennedy2, Denise C. Park2, Hanzhang Lu1

1Advanced Imaging Research Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States; 2Center for Vital Longevity, University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas, TX, United States

Cognitive aging studies using BOLD fMRI have revealed a wealth of information about the aging brain. However, few previous studies have considered the decline of brain vascular health with age as confounding factor. We conducted the first cognitive aging study in lifespan that interpreted fMRI findings in the context of vascular changes. Our observations provide strong evidence of a need to re-examine previous fMRI aging literature and suggest that previous studies may have over-estimated age-related decline while under-estimating the extent of compensatory over-recruitment. The reactivity-corrected fMRI data suggested no evidence of age-related decline in neural activity under similar task performance.

 

11:45           0031.Striatum-Motor Network Functional Connectivity Deficits in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis:A Resting State fMRI

Ming Zhang1, Pan Lin2, Chenwang Jin1, Cuiping Mao1, Chen Niu1, ZhiGang Min1, Jingxia Dang3, Qiaoting Jin3, Xin Liu2

1Department of Medical Imaging, the First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College,Xian Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi, China; 2Key Laboratory of Biomedical Information Engineering of Education Ministry, Xian Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi, China; 3Department of Neurology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College,Xian Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi, China

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by deficits in motor systems.Striatum-motor network has found to play important role in motor control.Whether the fluctuations of resting fMRI signal within striatum-motor network funtional connectivity is associated with abnormal neuronal activity remains unclear.In this study, we specifically investigate wheather patients with ALS is associated with dysfunction of interregion functional connectivity in striatum-motor network that support motor function.

 

11:57           0032.Resting-State Functional Connectivity in Prodromal Huntington’s Disease

Katherine A. Koenig1, Stephen M. Rao2, Mark J. Lowe1, Jian Lin1, Deborah L. Harrington3, Dawei Liu4, Ken Sakaie1, Jane S. Paulsen5

1Imaging Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, United States; 2Schey Center for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Neurological Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, United States; 3Research, Neurology, and Radiology Services, Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, CA, United States; 4Department of Biostatistics, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA, United States; 5Department of Psychiatry, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA, United States

Functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI), measured from low-frequency fluctuations in the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) timeseries during rest, has the potential to identify disruptions in intrinsic brain connectivity in the prodromal stages of Huntington’s disease (HD). The current study evaluated differences in 8 gene-negative subjects, 8 gene-positive subjects who were close to diagnosis of manifest HD, and 8 gene-positive subjects who were far from diagnosis of manifest HD. Significant group differences in the strength of connectivity from the left insula and the right supplementary motor cortex represent the first report of resting-state fcMRI differences in prodromal HD individuals.

 

12:09           0033.Accounting for Movement Increases Sensitivity in Detecting Brain Activity in Parkinson's Disease

Štefan Holiga1, Harald E. Möller1, TomᚠSieger2, 3, Matthias L. Schroeter1, 4, Robert Jech2, Karsten Mueller1

1Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany; 2Department of Neurology and Center of Clinical Neuroscience, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic; 3Department of Cybernetics, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic; 4Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, Leipzig, Germany

 

12:21           0034.Spectrogram & BOLD Analysis of Stop Consonants in Parkinsonism

Mohit Saxena1, Senthil S. Kumaran2, Vinay Goyal1, Vaishna Narang3, Madhuri Behari1

1Department of Neurology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, Delhi, India; 2Department of N.M.R., All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, Delhi, India; 3The School of Language, Literature and Culture Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, Delhi, India

Parkinsonism is associated with speech dysfunction. The study evaluates the abnormalities in articulatory planning, execution and their correlation in Parkinson’s disease (PD), Multiple System Atrophy (MSA) and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) with the BOLD activation pattern, to understand the speech deficits in these disorders.

 

12:33           0035.Altered Functional Network in Different Stage of Patients with Parkinson's Disease: Evidence from Resting-State FMRI

Qin Chen1, Pinglei Pan1, Wei Song1, Hehan Tang2, Dong Zhou1, Qiyong Gong2, Huifang Shang1

1Department of Neurology, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China; 2Department of Radiology, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China

Recent studies have applied functional MRI to investigate the altered brain function on PD patients[2,3], but it still remains unclear about how the neural network changes in different stages of PD. The present study aims to examine alterations pattern of regional and neural network function in PD patients in different stages by using resting state fMRI. The result indicated that a complementary hyperactivity neural network in the early stage shifted to a normal level or even decreased function in the late stage in patients with PD.

 

Tumor Therapy Response: Preclinical & Clinical

Room 210-211 10:45-12:45            Moderators: Kristine Glunde & Anwar R. Padhani

10:45           0036.Measuring Lymph Node Swelling Using MRI to Act as a Biomarker for Tumour Suppression

MAGNA25Kim Brewer1, 2, Drew DeBay3, Kerry Lake3, Iulia Dude3, 4, Genevieve Weir1, Marc Mansour1, Chris Bowen, 23

1Immunovaccine Inc., Halifax, NS, Canada; 2School of Biomedical Engineering, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada; 3Institute for Biodiagnostics (Atlantic), National Research Council of Canada, Halifax, NS, Canada; 4Physics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada

Immunotherapies are aimed at potentiating the body’s immune response. DepoVaxTM is an immunotherapy vaccine that encapsulates the tumor-associated antigens in liposomes, which are then suspended in oil. The oil acts as an adjuvant, which improves the potency of the peptides and aids in eliciting a strong immune response. This work investigated whether an increase in the draining lymph node (LN) volume (right inguinal LN) could be used as a biomarker for successful vaccination (i.e. successful tumor suppression). This was done by performing longitudinal LN volumetry using MRI to evaluate changes using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves.

 

10:57           0037.Chronic & Acute Anti-Angiogenic Treatment Effects Detected by Arterial Spin Labeling in Mouse Tumor

MAGNA25Reshmi Rajendran1, Mei Yee Tang1, Huang Wei1, Jie Ming Liang1, Stephanie Choo1, Torsten Reese2, Hannes Hentze2, Susan van Boxtel2, Brian Henry2, Kai Hsiang Chuang1

1Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Singapore Bioimaging Consortium, Singapore, Singapore; 2Merck Sharp and Dohme, Singapore

We applied optimized Flow-sensitive Alternating Inversion Recovery (FAIR) ASL to non-invasively quantify tumor perfusion in a mouse xenograft model, in which acute (24-hour) and chronic (43-day) treatment effects of the VEGF inhibitor (Avastin®) was investigated. Our data indicate that significant reduction in tumor perfusion was seen after acute dosing (p<0.05 vs. the control group), suggesting FAIR ASL perfusion could be used as an early biomarker for treatment response. Similarly, the chronic treatment of Avastin also led to a decrease in tumor size and perfusion; however, the drug effect varied significantly among the animals, possibly due to the heterogeneity of tumor progression.

 

11:09           0038.Mapping Water Exchange in Rat Tumour Xenografts: Using Multiple Flip Angles During Late-Uptake Stages Contrast Agent Injection

MAGNA25Colleen Bailey1, 2, Firas Moosvi1, 2, Greg J. Stanisz1, 2

1Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Imaging Research, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada

Intra-to-extracellular water exchange has been shown to increase during apoptotic cell death In Vitro. To map exchange in vivo, four flip angles were used during the late near-constant stages of uptake following three separate injections of Gd-DTPA-BMA in rat tumour xenografts. High extracellular water fraction corresponded to low cellularity on H&E. Regions of low water exchange were negative on TUNEL staining, while regions of high water exchange were positive, indicating apoptosis. High water exchange was observed even in cases where cells had not cleared and water fraction did not yet show a change.

 

11:21           0039.A New Biomarker for the Assessment of Early Tumor Response to Chemotherapy Using MR Elastography (MRE)

SUMMA25Kay Pelletier1, Kiaran McGee2, Jun Chen2, Kevin Glaser2, Stephen Ansell3, Richard Ehman2

1Mayo Graduate School, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States; 2Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States; 3Hematology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States

 

It is appreciated that a significant delay exists from the initiation of chemotherapy to the detection of a response as assessed by changes in tumor volume. in vivo serial measurements in a non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma mouse tumor model have demonstrated that tumor stiffness measured with MR Elastography (MRE) decreases following chemotherapy administration in comparison to saline-treated (placebo) tumors. This difference is statistically significant 48 hours following drug administration. These data suggest that tumor stiffness may be an earlier and more sensitive biomarker of therapeutic response than the current imaging-based methods such as FDG-PET, MRI and CT

 

11:33           0040.Characterisation of a Novel Orthotopic Mouse Model of Multiple Myeloma & Therapeutic Response by Quantitative MRI

MAGNA25Timothy J. Graham1, Rosemary A. Fryer2, Yann Jamin1, Emma M. Smith2, Simon Walker-Samuel3, Faith E. Davies2, Simon P. Robinson1

1Cancer Research UK & EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, The Institute of Cancer Research, London, Surrey, United Kingdom; 2Haemato-Oncology Research Unit, Division of Molecular Pathology, The Institute of Cancer Research, London, Surrey, United Kingdom; 3Centre for Advanced Biomedical Imaging, University College London, London, United Kingdom

With the development of more targeted therapeutics to treat malignant bone disease has come the associated challenge of developing more clinically relevant pre-clinical models, and identifying new non-invasive techniques capable of assessing the tumour phenotype and treatment response. To this end, a novel mouse model of multiple myeloma, propagated by direct intraosseous injection of cells, has been investigated by quantitative MRI. Tumour growth was localised to the skeleton, and assessed using high-resolution T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging. Response to Bortezomib and Tosedostat was also assessed. Bioluminescence imaging , weekly Ig&#955; serum levels, histology and flow cytometry provided qualification of the MRI data.

 

11:45           0041.Parameterizing the Logistic Model of Tumor Growth by DW-MRI & DCE-MRI to Predict Breast Tumor Cellularity During Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

SUMMA25Nkiruka C. Atuegwu1, 2, Lori R. Arlinghaus1, 2, Xia Li1, 2, E Brian Welch1, 2, A Bapsi Chakravarthy3, Thomas E.

Yankeelov1, 2

1Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, United States; 2Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, United States; 3Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, United States

Sequential diffusion weighted MRI (DW-MRI) and dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) data were acquired on twelve patients with localized invasive breast cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The DW-MRI and DCE-MRI data were incorporated into the logistic model of tumor growth to extract the proliferation rates of the tumors and this was then used to calculate the number of cells at the conclusion of therapy. The simulated and the experimentally estimated number of cells at the conclusion of therapy were then compared.

 

11:57           0042.Multi-Parametric Approach for the Assessment of Tumor Response to Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer (LABC) Patients: Sequential MRI, DWI & In-Vivo MRS Study

Naranamangalam Raghunathan Jagannathan1, Rani G. Sah1, Uma Sharma1, Rajinder Parshad2, Vurthaluru Seenu2

1Department of NMR & MRI Facility, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, Delhi, India; 2Department of Surgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, Delhi, India

Sequential MRI and MRS before therapy and after I, II and neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) was carried out in 41 breast cancer patients to evaluate the potential of total choline (tCho), ADC and tumor volume to predict tumor response. Our data revealed significant decrease in tCho and ADC after I NACT compared to pre-therapy in responders compared to non-responders. Percentage reduction in tCho was significantly higher compared to ADC and volume in responders after I NACT, which demonstrated early change in metabolic activity compared to structural changes. The combined specificity of all the 3 parameters was higher than the individual parameter.

 

12:09           0043.Transcatheter Intraarterial Perfusion MRI Is an Intra-Procedural Imaging Biomarker to Predict Survival During Chemoembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Dingxin Wang1, 2, Ron Gaba3, Brian Jin4, Robert Lewandowski4, 5, Robert Ryu4, Kent Sato4, Laura Kulik6, Mary Mulcahy7, 8, Andrew Larson4, 5, Riad Salem4, 5, Reed Omary4, 5

1Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, United States; 2Center for Magnetic Resonance Research, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States; 3Department of Radiology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States; 4Department of Radiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, United States; 5Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, United States; 6Department of Hepatology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, United States; 7Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, United States; 8Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center,, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, United States

In this study, we tested the hypothesis that TRIP-MRI monitored tumor perfusion changes during TACE can predict overall survival in patients with unresectable HCC. Our study shows the evidence of association between intra-procedural tumor perfusion reduction during TACE and overall survival. TACE provided better survival benefit when relative perfusion reduction was 35-85%. The present results also suggest that TRIP-MRI performed within an integrated MR-DSA unit may serve as an intra-procedural imaging biomarker to predict survival in patients with unresectable HCC at the time of TACE procedure.

 

12:21           0044.Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Pathological Response Prediction After Neo-Adjuvant Radiochemotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

Martijn Intven1, Onne Reerink1, Marielle E.P. Philippens1

1Radiation Oncology, UMC Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands

Standard therapy for rectal cancer is neo-adjuvant therapy followed by resection. Evidence for organ-sparing therapy for good treatment responders after neo-adjuvant therapy is growing. Reliable selection of candidates for organ-sparing treatment is vital to prevent undertreatment of patients. In this study in 44 patients the predictive potential of diffusion-weighted MR Imaging for the selection of favorable responders was assessed. Both low pre-therapy ADC values and high relative ADC change (ÄADC) after neo-adjuvant therapy corresponded with pathological good response. The positive predictive value for predicting a good response was 89% for the ÄADC.

 

12:33           0045.The DCE-MRI δKtrans Biomarker Provides Early Prediction of Soft-Tissue Sarcoma Response to Anti-Angiogenic Therapy

Janelle M. Meyer1, Brooke R. Beckett1, Xin Li1, Luminita A. Tudorica1, Aneela Afzal1, Stephanie Hemmingson1, Yiyi Chen1, Megan L. Holtorf1, William J. Woodward1, Charles S. Springer1, Christopher W. Ryan1, Wei Huang1

1Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, United States

Nine soft-tissue sarcoma patients underwent DCE-MRI scans during the course of a phase I trial of antiangiogenic potentiatiated preoperative chemoradiotherapy. MRI data were acquired before therapy, after two weeks of antiangiogenic therapy only, and after eight more weeks of antiangiogenic therapy plus chemoradiotherapy. The % changes in tumor ROI and histogram median ÄKtrans values after two weeks provided superior early prediction of therapy pathologic response compared to those in tumor size, ADC, and other DCE-MRI parameters. ROI and median ÄKtrans changes after two weeks also exhibited a linear relationship with the % necrosis at surgery after ten weeks.

 

Relaxometry in the Musculoskeletal System

Room

212-213 10:45-12:45            Moderators: Ari Borthakur & Christine Chung

10:45           0046.Rapid Volumetric T2 Measurements in Muscle Pre- & Post-Exercise Using Quantitative DESS

MAGNA25Lauren M. Shapiro1, Bragi Sveinsson1, 2, Marcus T. Alley1, Brian A. Hargreaves1, Garry E. Gold1, 3

1Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States; 2Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States; 3Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States

Change in T2 relaxation time in muscle is an indication of muscle activity. Unfortunately, two-dimensional spin echo techniques to acquire T2 maps suffer from long acquisition times, blurring, artifacts and limited coverage. We evaluate the effect of exercise upon muscle T2 using a recently validated 3D quantitative DESS (qDESS) sequence in entire muscles at 3.0T. We compare T2 values in the medial and lateral gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior in 8 volunteers before exercise and at three points post-exercise. T2 values in all muscles peaked immediately post-exercise, and significant T2 differences between exercised and non-exercised legs were seen.

 

10:57           0047.Introducing Dynamic Multi-Exponential T2-Relaxation for Studying Muscle Pattern & Activation in the Human

Burkhard Mädler1, Jürgen Gieseke2, 3, Volker A. Coenen1

1Neurosurgery and Stereotaxis, University Bonn, Bonn, NRW, Germany; 2Philips Healthcare, Best, Netherlands; 3Radiology, University Bonn, Bonn, NRW, Germany

We successfully demonstrate the ability of acquiring high resolution in-vivo T2-relaxation data for quantitative multi-component analysis in human muscle with adequate B1-correction techniques. The T2-components identified are in agreement with recent non-spatially resolved studies from high SNR single voxel T2-experiment. The ability to monitor dynamic changes in muscle-compartmentalization might provide a powerful technique to assess the effectiveness of specific exercise and rehabilitation protocols and monitor treatment efficacy of interventions. This information may proof very valuable to understand compensatory muscle activation in the healthy human subjects as well as patterns associated with injury and/or pathophysiology.

 

11:09           0048.Correlation of Meniscal T2* with Multiphoton Microscopy and Changes of Articular Cartilage T2 in an Ovine Model of Meniscal Repair

Matthew F. Koff1, Lisa A. Fortier2, Scott A. Rodeo3, Parina Shah1, Bethsabe Romero4, Sarah Pownder2, Rebecca Williams5, Suzanne Maher6, Hollis G. Potter1

1Department of Radiology and Imaging - MRI, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, United States; 2College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, United States; 3Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, United States; 4Department of Molecular Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, United States; 5Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, United States; 6Department of Biomechanics, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, United States

MRI is commonly used to evaluate repairs of knee meniscus, and ultra-short echo imaging (UTE) allows for a quantitative assessment of the repair site. This study correlated T2* mapping using UTE imaging with quantitative histologic multiphoton microscopy (MPM) methods, and also evaluated the effect of meniscal repair on cartilage T2 values. Meniscal T2* values correlated with MPM measures of collagen content and crosslinking. Increased cartilage T2 values indicated an altered biomechanical loading pattern in the joint. These data lend strong support to the use of T2 and T2* applications to clinical meniscal repair and the assessment of risk for osteoarthritis.

 

11:21           0049.Ultrashort TE-Enhanced T2* Mapping of Deep Articular Cartilage Detects Sub-Clinical Degeneration

Ashley Williams1, Yongxian Qian2, Constance R. Chu1

1Cartilage Restoration Center, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States; 2Magnetic Resonance Research Center, University of Pittsburgh

UTE-T2* mapping is sensitive to short-T2 signals and therefore has the potential to provide prognostic indication of otherwise clinically occult knee osteoarthritis in deep articular cartilage. UTE-T2* maps were evaluated in 53 human subjects. Significant elevations of UTE-T2* values in deep femoral condylar cartilage of subjects with ACL and/or meniscal injury without clinical evidence of subsurface cartilage abnormality suggest that UTE-T2* mapping is sensitive to sub-clinical cartilage degeneration. Significant decreases in UTE-T2* values measured longitudinally over 12 months following ACL reconstruction suggest that UTE-T2* can be used to quantitatively monitor changes to cartilage status in response to therapeutic interventions.

 

11:33           0050.Multi-Exponential T2 Mapping of Human Patellar Cartilage Using McDESPOT

Fang Liu1, Samuel A. Hurley1, Nade Sritanyaratana2, Walter F. Block1, 2, Richard Kijowski3

1Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, United States; 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, United States; 3Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, United States

mcDESPOT was used to create multi-exponential T2 relaxation time and water fraction maps of patellar cartilage in 3 asymptomatic volunteers at 3.0T in a 20 minute scan time. T2 and water fraction values for the tightly bound macromolecular water component (Wm) and loosely bound bulk water component (Wb) were similar to values reported for ex-vivo bovine cartilage specimens using NMR spectroscopy. T2 for the Wb component was higher in the superficial than the deep layer of cartilage. Wm fraction was higher in the deep layer of cartilage, while Wb fraction was higher in the superficial layer.

 

11:45           0051.T1rho Dispersion in Constituent-Specific Degradation Models of Articular Cartilage with Correlation to Biomechanical Properties

SUMMA25Elli-Noora Salo1, 2, Timo Liimatainen3, Shalom Michaeli4, Silvia Mangia4, Jutta Ellermann4, Miika T. Nieminen1, 5, Mikko J. Nissi, 24

1Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland; 2Department of Applied Physics, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; 3Department of Biotechnology and Molecular Medicine, A. I. Virtanen Institute, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; 4Center for Magnetic Resonance Research, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States; 5Department of Medical Technology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland

T relaxation time has been proposed and demonstrated as a marker for articular cartilage degeneration. However, the sensitivity of T to different tissue constituents remains somewhat unclear. In this study, we investigated T relaxation dispersion at four clinically relevant spin-lock fields (γB1 = 125-1000 Hz) in proteoglycan- and collagen-specific enzymatic degradation models. The results suggest that the properties of the collagen network contribute significantly to T relaxation and dispersion in cartilage. Increasing spin-lock power altered the T sensitivity to the constituents, as well as the correlation with biomechanical properties.

 

11:57           0052.T2 Mapping Sequence for Detecting Cartilage Lesion Within the Knee Joint at 3.0T: Diagnostic Performance in 114 Patients with Surgical Correlation

Richard Kijowski1, Donna Blankenbaker1, Arthur De Smet1, Geoffrey Baer2, Ben Graf2

1Radiology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, United States; 2Orthopedic Surgery, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, United States

A routine MRI protocol consisting of multi-planar fast spin-echo sequences and a sagittal T2 mapping sequence were performed at 3.0T on the knee of 114 symptomatic patients who underwent subsequent arthroscopy. Two radiologists reviewed all MRI examinations to determine the presence or absence of cartilage lesions first using the routine MRI protocol alone and then using the routine MRI protocol along with the T2 maps. Adding the T2 mapping sequence to the routine MRI protocol improved the sensitivity for detecting surgically confirmed cartilage lesions from 72% to 88% with only a moderate reduction in specificity.

 

12:09           0053.In Plane T2 Mapping & Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Lumbar Nerve Roots Using a Reduced-FOV Acquisition

Dimitrios C. Karampinos1, Gerd Melkus1, Timothy M. Shepherd1, Suchandrima Banerjee2, Emine U. Saritas3, Ajit Shankaranarayanan2, Chistopher P. Hess1, Thomas M. Link1, William P. Dillon1, Sharmila Majumdar1

1Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States; 2Global Applied Science Laboratory, GE Healthcare, Menlo Park, CA, United States; 3Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, United States

T2 mapping and diffusion tensor imaging may quantitate inflammatory changes to lumbar nerve roots affected by degenerative spine disease. However, imaging spinal nerve roots accurately is difficult due to their small caliber and oblique course in all three planes. We describe initial success using a reduced-FOV single-shot spin-echo EPI acquisition to obtain T2 mapping and DTI of the bilateral lumbar nerve roots at the L4 level for healthy volunteers.

 

12:21           0054.Validation of Bound & Free Water Measurement Using Bi-Component Analysis of UTE Images of Cortical Bone

Jiang Du1, Shawn Grogan2, Won Bae1, Christine B. Chung1, Darryl DLima2, Graeme M. Bydder1

1Radiology, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, United States; 2Scripps Clinic, San Diego, CA, United States

 

12:33           0055.Can Bound & Mobile Bone Water Be Distinguished by T2* at 9.4T?

MAGNA25Henry H. Ong1, Felix W. Wehrli1

1Laboratory for Structural NMR Imaging, Departement of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, United States

Differentiating bound and mobile bone water (BW) may provide valuable insight in bone health and microarchitecture. Previous reports have used T2* relaxometry to quantify bound and mobile BW at 0.6T and 3T. Here, we investigate the potential to quantify bound and mobile BW with T2* relaxometry at 9.4T. We compared 3-component exponential fits of FIDs from human cortical bone specimens with measurements of BW concentration, porosity, and bound and mobile BW fractions unambiguously quantified by deuterium NMR. The results show that at this field strength the 3-components primarily correlate with collagen protons and mobile BW but not with bound BW

 

MRS of Disease, Injury & Pathology in the Body & MSK

Room .

219-220 10:45-12:45            Moderators: Gregory S. Karczmar & Craig R. Malloy

10:45           0056.HIF-1α & HIF-2α Double Silenced MDA-MB-231 Human Breast Cancer Cells Show Reduced Invasion & Degradation of the Extracellular Matrix

Tariq Shah1, Balaji Krishnamachary1, Flonne Wildes1, Yelena Mironchik1, Zaver M. Bhujwalla1

1Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States

The hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) is a master regulator of hypoxia inducible genes several of which facilitate invasion and metastasis. Here, using our MR-compatible cell perfusion assay, we investigated the effect of HIF-1α and HIF-2α silencing on the ability of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells to invade and degrade the extracellular matrix (ECM). MDA-MB-231 HIF double knocked down cells showed a significant decrease in invasion and ECM degradation, as well as altered metabolism. These data demonstrate the importance of silencing both HIF-1 and 2α; to reduce ECM degradation and invasion in this triple negative aggressive and metastatic breast cancer cell line.

 

10:57           0057.Human Melanoma Metabolic Network Analysis with Combined 13C NMR/Bioreactor Technique: Testing the Warburg Effect

Alexander A. Shestov1, Anthony Mancuso2, 3, Pierre-Gilles Henry1, Dennis B. Leeper4, Jerry D. Glickson2

1CMRR, Radiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States; 2Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine; 3Abramson Comprehensive Cancer Center; 4Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University

 

The bioreactor techniques are becoming an important tool to study cancer cell metabolism. Modeling of intracellular MRS isotopomer data obtained during perfusion with 13C labeled substrates allows quantitative determination of transport and metabolic parameters and fluxes in vivo/in situ. In this work we develop a 13C metabolic “bonded cumomer” approach to fit data obtained in bioreactor with 13C glucose perfusion and elucidate cancer metabolism bionetwork.

 

11:09           0058.Lonidamine Reverses the Cell Membrane PH Gradient of Human DB-1 Melanoma Xenografts

MAGNA25Kavindra Nath1, David Nelson1, Andrew Ho1, Moses Darpolor1, Stephen Pickup1, Rong Zhou1, Daniel Heitjan2, Deenis Leeper3, Jerry Glickson1

1Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States; 2Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States; 3Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, United States

Synopsis: Tumors generally have an acidic extracellular pH (pHe) and a neutral to alkaline intracellular pH (pHi), whereas normal cells generally exhibit neutral intracellular and extracellular environments. Here we demonstrate by 31P MRS that the administration of lonidamine (100 mg/kg, i.p.) reverses the pH gradient of human DB-1 melanoma xenografts in nude mice: pHe going from 7.00 ± 0.04 to 6.80 ± 0.07 (p = 0.085) while pHi goes from 6.90 ± 0.05 to 6.40 ± 0.10 (p < 0.001). Selective tumor acidification makes the tumor much more susceptible to systemic chemotherapy with nitrogen mustards.

 

11:21           0059.Comparison of Hyperpolarized [1-13C] Dehydroascorbate-MR and FDG-PET in a Transgenic Prostate Cancer Model

MAGNA25Kayvan R. Keshari1, Victor Sai1, Kristen Scott1, John Kurhanewicz1, Henry F. VanBrocklin1, David M. Wilson1

1Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), San Francisco, CA, United States

We have developed a new in vivo redox sensor, hyperpolarized [1-13C] dehydroascorbate (DHA), the oxidized form of Vitamin C. This probe is rapidly taken into the cell via glucose (GLUT) transporters and then reduced to ascorbate (VitC), to a greater extent in transgenic prostate (TRAMP) tumor than the normal gland. Since [1-13C] DHA has an essentially identical transport mechanism to 2-18F-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG), we speculated the two techniques might have significant overlap. DHA-MR and FDG-PET studies were performed in a cohort of TRAMP mice at identical time points revealing similar ability to distinguish between tumor and surrounding benign tissue.

 

11:33           0060.In Vivo Hyperpolarized 13C-MRS Shows Abnormal Cardiac Metabolism in the PPARα Knockout Mouse

MAGNA25Michael Dodd1, 2, Rosalind Bray1, Vicky Ball1, Mark Cole1, Kieran Clarke1, Damian Tyler1

1Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, Oxford University, Oxford, OXON, United Kingdom; 2Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Oxford University, Oxford, OXON, United Kingdom

Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-&#945; (PPAR&#945;)plays an important role in the regulation of fatty acid oxidation. The PPAR&#945; knockout mouse (PPAR&#945;-KO) has been developed to investigate the role of PPAR&#945; in cardiac metabolism and disease. This work aimed to assess the in vivo metabolic phenotype of PPAR&#945;-KO mice using hyperpolarized 13C-MRS. During the fed state, PPAR&#945;-KO mice had significantly elevated pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) flux compared to controls. During fasting there was a similar reduction in PDH flux in both control and PPAR&#945;-KO mice, indicating that this alteration is PPAR&#945; independent and is a response to increased fatty acid supply and utilization.

 

11:45           0061.Localized Dynamics of Hyperpolarized 13C Pyruvate in Prostate Cancer Patients

Peder E. Z. Larson1, Galen D. Reed, Adam B. Kerr2, John M. Pauly2, Robert Bok, Marcus Ferrone, Andrea Harzstark, Sarah J. Nelson, John Kurhanewicz, Daniel B. Vigneron

1UCSF, San Francisco, CA, United States; 2Stanford University

As part of the first hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate clinical trial, we developed a specialized dynamic 13C 2D EPSI sequence using short multiband pulses, and applied it in four prostate cancer patients. Time-resolved MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) following injection of hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate can provide valuable and detailed metabolic information, including perfusion, uptake and kinetics. We observed SNRs up to 340 for pyruvate within 15-20 sec after injection, and SNRs up to 17 for lactate within 25-35 sec after injection. The signal lasted for up to 75 sec for pyruvate and 70 sec for lactate.

 

11:57           0062.1H-MRS Investigation of IMCL Storage During Resting in Skeletal Muscle: Obese Versus Normal Rats

Zhongwei Qiao1, 2, Peng Cao1, 3, Anna M. Wang1, 2, Victor B. Xie1, 2, Shujuan Fan1, 2, Ed X. Wu1, 2

1Laboratory of Biomedical Imaging and Signal Processing, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China; 2Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China; 3Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Hong Kong,, Hong Kong SAR, China

In this study, we hypothesized that the gradual IMCL storage occurs in skeletal muscle during resting, and such storage at resting state would alter in obesity. Specifically, we investigated the IMCL storage at resting state in obese rats by quantifying the rates of IMCL accumulation using continuous and dynamic 1H-MRS. We demonstrated that dynamic 1H-MRS could quantify the IMCL accumulation at resting state in individual muscles. Our preliminary results revealed that the disorder of lipid metabolism in obesity is associated with not only an increased IMCL content, but also the alterations in the rates of IMCL storage at resting state in both slow-oxidative muscle and fast-oxidative glycolytic muscles.

 

12:09           0063.Diffusion Investigation of Intramyocellular Lipid Droplet Changes in Skeletal Muscle Under Fasting Condition

SUMMA25Peng Cao1, 2, Zhongwei Qiao1, 2, Anna M. Wang1, 2, Shujuan Fan1, 2, Victor B. Xie1, 2, Jian Yang1, 3, Ed X. Wu1, 2

1Laboratory of Biomedical Imaging and Signal Processing, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China; 2Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China; 3Medical Imaging Center of the First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shanxi Province, China

Biophysical properties of intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) such as droplet size may reflect the balance between droplet synthesis and degradation. In this study, we hypothesized that characterizing the restricted diffusion of IMCL protons could serve as a sensitive marker for monitoring IMCL droplet dynamics during metabolic intervention/abnormality. Our experimental results demonstrated that in vivo IMCL diffusion characteristics are sensitive to metabolic manipulation by fasting. During the 60-hr fasting, IMCL level increased but exhibited more restricted diffusion, largely in agreement with our histological observation of more droplets but of smaller sizes. Such IMCL diffusion characterization may serve as a sensitive marker to probe the IMCL droplet dynamics in vivo.

 

12:21           0064.Lack of Extracellular Adenosine Formation Promotes Lipolysis, Intromyocellular Lipid Deposition & Peripheral Insulin Resistance

Ulrich Flögel1, Sandra Burghoff1, Jürgen Schrader1

1Molecular Cardiology, Heinrich Heine University, Düsseldorf, NRW, Germany

In the present study, we used CD73-deficient mice to characterize the metabolic consequences of impaired extracellular adenosine formation using 1H MRI and 1H/13C MRS for analysis of body fat content and composition as well as hepatic and myocellular lipid distribution. We found that disrupted extracellular adenosine formation due to lack of CD73 leads to an enhanced lipolysis accompanied by accumulation of intramyocellular lipids in skeletal muscle and peripheral insulin resistance. These findings suggest that CD73-derived adenosine is an important modulator of lipolysis and might be critically involved in development of diseases like diabetes mellitus and the metabolic syndrome.

 

12:33           0065.Ethnic Disparity of Pancreatic Triglyceride Levels: Implications for Type 2 Diabetes Development

Lidia S. Szczepaniak1, Ruchi Mathur1, Edward Szczepaniak1, Nicole Tyer1, Michael D. Nelson1, Ida Chen1, Ronald G. Victor1, Ildiko Lingvay2

1Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, United States; 2UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States

The exact role of pancreatic fat in the development of human impaired glucose tolerance remains unclear. Basic research using rodent models of type 2 diabetes has identified pancreatic steatosis and lipotoxicity as a leading cause of beta cell dysfunction. We sought to translate these mechanistic studies into the clinical population. Our data suggest that pancreatic steatosis may identify a subset of asymptomatic individuals who are at high risk for development of type 2 diabetes. 1H-MRS and measurement of pancreatic TG content may constitute a new therapeutic target. Our data also highlight a potential need for ethnically appropriate preclinical biomarkers.

 

 

Clinical Intensive Course

Neurological MR Imaging in Nutrition

Organizers: Marco Essig, M.D., Ph.D., Nadine J. Girard, M.D. & Robia G. Pautler, Ph.D.

Room 105-106 10:45-12:45            Moderator: Marco Essig, M.D., Ph.D.

10:45           . Methods

Ponnada A. Narayana, Ph.D.

 

11:25           . Pediatric

Rakesh K. Gupta, M.D.

 

12:05           . Adults

Niranjan Khandelwal, M.D., M.B.B.S.

 

12:45           . Adjournment

 

 

Clinical Intensive Course

Pediatric Body MRI

Organizers: Caroline Reinhold, M.D., Evis Sala, M.D., Ph.D., F.R.C.R. & Shreyas S. Vasanawala, M.D., Ph.D.

Room 109-110 10:45-12:45            Moderators: Claudia M. Hillenbrand, Ph.D. & Shreyas Vasanawala, M.D.

10:45           . Pediatric Body MRI: How I Do It

Michael Ditchfield, M.D., M.B.B.S.

 

11:15           . Evaluation of Renal Function with MRI in Pediatric Patient

Manojkumar Saranathan, Ph.D.

 

11:45           . MRI Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: What is Your Regimen

Daniel J. Podberesky, M.D.

 

12:15           . The Role of Pediatric MRI in Iron Quantification

Claudia M. Hillenbrand, Ph.D.

 

12:45           . Adjournment

 

Gold Corporate Symposium: Phillips

Plenary Hall 13:00-14:00           

 

Traditional Poster Session: Engineering

Exhibition Hall 14:15-16:15           

 

Electronic Poster Session: Cancer; Interventional

Exhibition Hall 14:15-16:15           

 

Study Group Session: Diffusion

Room 203-204 14:15-16:15           

 

Young Investigator Award Presentations

Plenary Hall 14:15-16:15            Moderators: John A. Detre & Karla L. Miller

14:15           0066.Arterial Input Function for Bolus Tracking Perfusion Imaging in the Brain

SUMMA25Elias Kellner1, Irina Mader2, Daniel Nico Splitthoff1, Marco Reisert1, Katharina Förster3, Thao Nguyen-Thanh2, Peter Gall4, Valerij G. Kiselev1

1Department of Radiology, Medical Physics, University Medical Center Freiburg, D-79106 Freiburg, Germany; 2Section of Neuroradiology, Neurocenter of the Freiburg University Hospital, D-79106 Freiburg, Germany; 3Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, D-79106 Freiburg, Germany; 4Department of Radiology, Medical Physics,, University Medical Center Freiburg, D-79106 Freiburg, Germany

Dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI is a well-known method for determination of perfusion parameters in the brain. The major challenge of the method is to measure the contrast inflow into the brain, commonly, the arterial input function (AIF). The measurement of the AIF is subject to a number of problems such as signal void in blood, nonlinear dependence on contrast agent concentration and partial volume effects. In this study, those problems are solved with an extension of a conventional perfusion pulse sequence. Results obtained in an animal model reproduce known values of the cardiac output and the cerebral blood volume.

 

14:35           0067.Nonlinear Formulation of the Magnetic Field to Source Relationship for Robust Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping

Tian Liu1, Cynthia Wisnieff2, 3, Min Lou4, Weiwei Chen5, Pascal Spincemaille3, Yi Wang2, 3

1MedImageMetric LLC, New York, NY, United States; 2Biomedical Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, United States; 3Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, United States; 4Neurology, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China; 5Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science& Technology (HUST), Wuhan, Hubei, China

Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping is becoming an increasingly active area of scientific and clinical investigations. In practical applications, there are sources of errors for QSM including noise, phase unwrapping failures and signal model inaccuracy. To improve the robustness of QSM quality, we propose a nonlinear data fitting for field map estimation and dipole inversion to reduce noise and phase unwrapping failures, and a method for model error reduction through iterative tuning. Compared to the previous linear QSM method, this nonlinear QSM method reduced checkerboard pattern in high susceptibility regions in healthy subjects and markedly reduced artifacts in patients with intracerebral hemorrhages.

 

14:55           0068.Chemical Shift Induced Phase Errors in Phase Contrast MRI

MAGNA25Matthew J. Middione1, 2, Daniel B. Ennis, 23

1Department of Radiological Sciences, Diagnostic Cardiovascular Imaging Section , University of California, Los Angeles, CA, United States; 2Biomedical Physics Interdepartmental Program, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, United States; 3Department of Radiological Sciences, Diagnostic Cardiovascular Imaging Section, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, United States

Phase contrast MRI (PC-MRI) is subject to numerous sources of error, which decrease both quantitative accuracy and clinical confidence in the reported measures. Perivascular fat surrounds most vessels and can chemically shift across the vessel wall into the lumen, thereby superposing the complex off-resonant fat signal onto the complex signal in a pixel containing flowing blood. This phase error can lead to a clinically significant over- or underestimation of net forward flow (10-20mL). A judicious choice of bandwidth and TE can reduce the chemical shift induced phase errors in PC-MRI net forward flow measurements to clinically insignificant levels (<5mL).

 

15:15           0069.Spatially Resolved Extended Phase Graphs: Modeling & Design of Multi-Pulse Sequences with Parallel Transmission

SUMMA25Shaihan J. Malik1, Joseph V. Hajnal1

1Robert Steiner MRI Unit, Imaging Sciences Department, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom

RF inhomogeneity correction using parallel transmission usually focuses on optimising RF field uniformity. Although improving field homogeneity generally improves images, most imaging sequences employ rapid successions of RF pulses, making the received signals depend on the combined history of many pulses interspersed with periods of relaxation. Independent modulation of separate pulses provides additional degrees of freedom for manipulation of resulting signal. Using a spatially resolved extended phase graph (SREPG) signal model, RF inputs may be optimised to produce uniform signals from non-uniform fields. Improved image homogeneity with more uniform contrast is demonstrated on 3D TSE brain imaging at 3T.

 

15:35           0070.In Vivo O-Space Imaging with a Dedicated 12 Cm Z2 Insert Coil on a Human 3T Scanner Using Phase Map Calibration

MAGNA25Jason Stockmann1, Gigi Galiana2, Leo Tam1, Christoph Juchem2, Terence Nixon2, Robert Todd Constable, 12

1Biomedical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, CT, United States; 2Diagnostic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT, United States

We present the first accelerated in vivo "O-Space" images acquired using a quadratic gradient insert coil in combination with conventional linear gradients. We achieve a highly accurate calibration by using phase encoding to map the spin phase in each voxel at every readout point of the O-Space pulse sequence, accounting for effects of field strength, timing, concomitant fields, and eddy currents. O-Space images compare favorably to under-sampled radial and Cartesian images at high acceleration factors using only 8 receive coils. This work paves the way for more in-depth future investigation of projection imaging with nonlinear encoding fields.

 

15:55           0071.A Kinetic Model for Vessel-Encoded Dynamic Angiography with Arterial Spin Labeling

MAGNA25Thomas W. Okell1, Michael A. Chappell, 12, Ursula G. Schulz3, Peter Jezzard1

1FMRIB Centre, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom; 2Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Engineering, University of Oxford, Oxford, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom; 3Stroke Prevention Research Unit, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom

Vessel-encoded dynamic angiography with arterial spin labeling is able to produce artery-specific images qualitatively showing the blood flow patterns, vessel morphology and hemodynamics. Here we develop a kinetic model to describe the signal in such acquisitions, allowing the generation of parameter maps relating to blood volume, arrival time and dispersion, which may provide useful biomarkers of disease. These parameters are also used to generate intuitive inflow images and calculate the relative blood volume flow rates in downstream vessels from each feeding artery. Results from application of these methods in healthy volunteers and a patient with Moyamoya disease are shown.

 

Compressed Sensing: New Methods

Room 201 14:15-16:15            Moderators: Alexey Samsonov & Lei (Leslie) Ying

14:15           0072.A Frame Work for Non-Rigid Motion Corrected Compressed Sensing for Highly Accelerated MRI

SUMMA25Muhammad Usman1, Christoph kolbitsch1, Ghislain Vaillant1, David Atkinson2, Tobias Schaeffter1, Philip G. Batchelor1, Claudia Prieto1, 3

1King's College London, London, United Kingdom; 2University College London; 3Escuela de Ingenieria, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago, Chile

Motion during MRI acquisition can cause inconsistencies in k-space, resulting in strong artefacts in the reconstructed images. Accelerated imaging using compressed sensing (CS) requires motion correction approaches not just to correct the motion related artefacts, but also to retain the sparsity level in the sparse representation, which is one of the requirements of CS reconstruction. Currently, only translational motion correction methods have been combined with CS. In this work, we propose a novel Motion Correction-Compressed Sensing (MC-CS )technique that can correct for any arbitrary non-rigid motion in CS undersample acquisitions. This approach was tested both in simulations and in-vivo data for 2D CINE MRI, and use to reconstruct respiratory motion-free cardiac cycle from free-breathing acquisitions.

 

14:27           0073.Three-Dimensional Hybrid-Encoding for Compressed Sensing MRI

Haifeng Wang1, Dong Liang2, King F. Kevin3, Gajanan Nagarsekar1, Leslie Ying1

1Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI, United States; 2Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China; 3Global Applied Science Laboratory, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI, United States

In compressed sensing with Fourier encoding, the low spatial frequency always has to be fully sampled such that the high frequency is insufficiently sampled at high accelerations, leading to serious loss of resolution. In this paper, we propose a novel 3-D acquisition method using hybrid encoding. The method exploits random encoding with a circulant structure along one direction, while keeping conventional Fourier encoding along the other two directions. Both simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method preserves better resolution than the conventional 3-D Fourier encoding when the same acceleration factor is used.In compressed sensing with Fourier encoding, the low spatial frequency always has to be fully sampled such that the high frequency is insufficiently sampled at high accelerations, leading to serious loss of resolution. In this paper, we propose a novel 3-D acquisition method using hybrid encoding. The method exploits random encoding with a circulant structure along one direction, while keeping conventional Fourier encoding along the other two directions. Both simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method preserves better resolution than the conventional 3-D Fourier encoding when the same acceleration factor is used.In compressed sensing with Fourier encoding, the low spatial frequency always has to be fully sampled such that the high frequency is insufficiently sampled at high accelerations, leading to serious loss of resolution. In this paper, we propose a novel 3-D acquisition method using hybrid encoding. The method exploits random encoding with a circulant structure along one direction, while keeping conventional Fourier encoding along the other two directions. Both simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method preserves better resolution than the conventional 3-D Fourier encoding when the same acceleration factor is used.

 

14:39           0074.Parameter-Free Compressed Sensing Reconstruction Using Statistical Non-Local Self-Similarity Filtering

Mariya Doneva1, Tim Nielsen1, Peter Börnert1

1Philips Research Europe, Hamburg, Germany

In this work, we present a CS reconstruction based on statistical non-local self-similarity filtering (STAINLeSS). The method provides improved image quality compared to wavelet based CS reconstruction and does not require any parameter adjustments. All the parameters are automatically determined by the noise estimation in the receive channels obtained from a standard noise measurement.

 

14:51           0075.Joint Bayesian Compressed Sensing with Prior Estimate

Berkin Bilgic1, Elfar Adalsteinsson1, 2

1EECS, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, United States; 2Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, MIT, Cambridge, MA, United States

In clinical MRI, it is routine to acquire images with different contrasts for increased diagnostic power. Yet depending on the imaging sequences, acquiring certain contrasts is relatively faster. Here, a Bayesian compressed sensing (CS) algorithm that uses a fully-sampled image as prior information to help reconstruct images from undersampled k-space is presented. This method substantially improves the reconstruction quality, and allows joint reconstruction of multi-contrast images.

 

15:03           0076.Dynamic Imaging Using Sparse Sampling with Rank & Group Sparsity Constraints

Anthony G. Christodoulou1, 2, S. Derin Babacan2, Zhi-Pei Liang1, 2

1Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, United States; 2Beckman Institute of Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, United States

This work highlights a novel dynamic imaging method which jointly uses partial separability (PS), sparsity, and group sparsity constraints to enable sparse sampling in (k,t)-space. The specific formulation of the group sparsity spatially varies the effective model order of the PS constraint as a form of controlling the balance between the PS and sparsity constraints.

 

15:15           0077.Blind Compressed Sensing Dynamic MRI

MAGNA25Sajan Goud Lingala1, Mathews Jacob2

1Biomedical Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa city, IA, United States; 2Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Iowa, IA, United States

In this work, we introduce a novel blind compressive sensing frame work for dynamic MRI reconstruction. This models the temporal profile at each voxel as a sparse linear combination of temporal basis functions chosen from a large dictionary, which are also estimated from the data. We show that the model significantly reduces the number of degrees of freedom than what is seen in schemes based on promoting low rank structure of the data. We demonstrate this concept on myocardial perfusion data sets with significant inter-frame motion. Significant improvement in the reconstruction qualities over low rank schemes are observed (eg: better preservation of subtle spatial details, reduced temporal blur and artifacts).

 

15:27           0078.MMSE Optimal Non-Local Motion Compensation for Compressed Sensing Cardiac Cine Imaging Using K-T FOCUSS

Huisu Yoon1, Jong Chul Ye1

1Bio and Brain engineering, KAIST, Dae-jeon, Korea, Republic of

Compressed sensing (CS) tells us that the perfect reconstruction is possible if the nonzero support in transform domain is sparse and sampling basis are incoherent. By exploiting that dynamic MRI can be sparsified due to the temporal redundancy, we have demonstrated successful application of CS for cardiac imaging. In particular, more accurate prediction using motion estimation/compensation or data-driven optimal temporal sparsifying transforms have proven to be quite effective. However, despite their successes to some extent, there still remain considerable artifacts in edge area when the acceleration factor increases.We propose a non-local motion compensated k-t FOCUSS which generates more accurate prediction images than the existing motion compensated k-t FOCUSS. Non-local motion compensation retrieves similar blocks in another reference frame, not within the processed dynamic frame itself. Non-local motion compensation is shown MMSE optimal and experimental result shows that the proposed algorithm clearly reconstruct the important cardiac structures and improves over k-t FOCUSS.

 

15:39           0079.Spatial & Temporal Behaviors in Rapid DCE MRI with & Without Compressed Sensing

Kyunghyun Sung1, Manoj Saranathan1, Brady Quist1, 2, Shreyas S. Vasanawala1, Bruce L. Daniel1, Brian A. Hargreaves1

1Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States; 2Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States

High spatial and temporal resolution is desirable for many dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI applications. Many view sharing methods have been developed to improve both spatial and temporal resolution, but those methods inherently increase temporal footprints, resulting in temporal blurring. In this work, we show a temporal footprint of the view sharing method can be improved by reconstructing the individual subsampled k-space using a novel CS reconstruction while maintaining excellent image quality in a total of 12 DCE MRI patients.

 

15:51           0080.Reconstruction for Dynamic 2D-Radial Cardiac MRI Using Prior Enhanced Compressed Sensing

Ti-chiun Chang1, Mariappan S. Nadar1, Jens Guehring2, Michael O. Zenge2, Kai T. Block3, Peter Speier2, Michael S. Hansen4, Edgar Mueller2

1Siemens Corporate Research, Princeton, NJ, United States; 2Siemens AG, Erlangen, Germany; 3NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, United States; 4National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, United States

 

Compressed sensing (CS) theory emerges as a promising approach that can accurately reconstruct a signal f even when its indirect measurement is severely undersampled. In the basic CS framework, the sparsity is the only prior knowledge exploited. In practice, measurement imperfections and noise are present, so the data reduction factor promised by CS is clearly reduced. To achieve better results, effort has been devoted to incorporating more prior estimates. In this work, the reconstruction results for dynamic 2d radial cardiac MRI are improved by using additional prior obtained from combining the interleaved samples in the dynamic image sequence

 

16:03           0081.K-T Radial SPARSE-SENSE: Combination of Compressed Sensing & Parallel Imaging with Golden Angle Radial Sampling for Highly Accelerated Volumetric Dynamic MRI

Li Feng1, 2, Hersh Chandarana1, Jian Xu3, Kai Tobias Block1, Daniel Sodickson1, Ricardo Otazo1

1Radiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, United States; 2Sackler Institute of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, New York University School of Medicine, New York, United States; 3Siemens Medical Solutions, New York, United States

Radial k-space sampling is a good candidate for compressed sensing due to the inherent incoherent aliasing artifacts. For dynamic applications, the incoherence can be further increased by using the golden-angle approach, which completely avoids acquisition of replicate radial lines. Moreover, the golden-angle approach allows for reconstruction of arbitrary time points with arbitrary temporal resolution. In this study, we propose a joint non-Cartesian image-reconstruction technique that combines compressed sensing and parallel imaging for accelerating volumetric dynamic MRI with stack-of-stars golden-angle radial trajectories. The performance of this technique is demonstrated for highly accelerated 3D free breathing liver perfusion imaging

 

CV Technology & Methodology

Room 210-211 14:15-16:15            Moderators: Thoralf Niendorf & Sonia Nielles-Vallespin

14:15           0082.Sodium Imaging of the Heart at 7T: Design, Evaluation and Application of a Four-Channel Transmit/Receive Surface Coil Array

Anjuli Ruehle1, Wolfgang Renz1, 2, Lukas Winter1, Harald Pfeiffer1, 3, Jan Ruff2, Jan Rieger1, Thoralf Niendorf1, 4

1Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility, Max-Delbrueck-Centrum for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany; 2Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany; 3Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Berlin, Germany; 4Experimental and Clinical Research Center (ECRC), Charité Campus Buch, Humboldt-University, Berlin, Germany

Insight of physiological processes and cellular metabolism makes 23Na-MRI conceptually appealing as non-invasive imaging discipline. Several studies report the applicability of 23Na-MRI for the detection and assessment of acute and chronic heart disease due to increased sodium concentration after myocardial infarctions. Bi-exponential decay of the signal and a low SNR compared to 1H-MRI makes 23Na-MRI unattractive for clinical use. With a high SNR and fast imaging technologies ultrahigh field MRI brings 23Na-MRI back into focus. In this study a new radiofrequency coil for cardiac MRI at 7T was developed and a volunteer study, as a precursor to a broader clinical study was performed.

 

14:27           0083.Predistorted B1 Shimming: A New Concept Based on Mutual Enhancement between Static B1 Shim & 1D Spoke RF Pulse Design. Application for Cardiac Imaging at 7 Tesla.

MAGNA25Sebastian Schmitter1, Xiaoping Wu1, Lance DelaBarre1, Kamil Ugurbil1, Pierre-Francois Van de Moortele1

1Center for Magnetic Resonance Research, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States

B1 shimming achieves high transmit B1 (B1+) efficiency with satisfactory B1+ homogeneity in small targets at 7T, however in large targets, e.g. heart, uniform |B1+| with static B1 shim results in low efficiency. Taking advantage of typical |B1+| profiles observed with transceiver arrays in the heart at 7T, we propose a new concept where, instead of aiming at homogeneous |B1+| profile, B1 shim is applied to achieve a predefined spatially distorted |B1+| pattern which, in turn, allows for efficient use of 1D spoke RF pulse design to provide homogeneous excitation in the heart while preserving high B1+ efficiency.

 

14:39           0084.Myocardial T1 Mapping with Phase-Sensitive Motion Correction & Inversion Recovery Fitting

Hui Xue1, Andreas Greiser2, Christoph Guetter1, Sven Zuehlsdorff3, Marie-Pierre Jolly1, Andrew E. Arai4, Jens Guehring2, Peter Kellman4

1Siemens Corporate Research, Princeton, NJ, United States; 2Imaging & IT Division, Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Erlangen, Germany; 3CMR R&D, Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Chicago, IL, United States; 4Laboratory of Cardiac Energetics, National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD, United States

The image quality of myocardial T1 mapping using the modified Look-Locker Inversion Recovery (MOLLI) sequence is often degraded by the motion among sampled images. A fully automated motion correction directly utilizing MOLLI images is highly challenging due to significantly varying image contrast and the signal inversion. To overcome this difficulty, we propose to restore the signal polarity for the entire MOLLI series using the phase sensitive image reconstruction. The inversion recovery fitting on MOLLI signals with restored polarity is more efficient and leads to lower residual errors. in vivo evaluation was performed on a cohort of 17 patients.

 

14:51           0085.Development of a Hybrid MR-US System for the Assessment of Cardiac Function During Free Breathing

MAGNA25W. B. Buchenberg1, S. Gruhlke1, J. Maclaren1, M. Markl2, A. Bongers3, J. Jenne3, M. Zaitsev1, B. Jung1

1Dept. of Radiology, Medical Physics, University Medical Center, Freiburg, Germany; 2Dept. of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University, Chicago, United States; 3mediri GmbH, Heidelberg, Germany

The aim of this work was to establish a hybrid MR-ultrasound (US) system to be used for respiratory gating in cardiac imaging on a 1.5T system, and to perform initial In Vitro and in vivo measurements as a first test of the developed procedures. Since the ultrasound system operates independently from the MR acquisitions, the update rate of the respiratory position can be significantly improved in Cine imaging compared to the standard navigator technique. This advantage was exploited by including one respiratory update per cardiac phase instead of a conventional update rate per heartbeat.

 

15:03           0086.Navigator Based Free Breathing Diffusion Tensor MRI of the Human Heart in vivo

Sonia Nielles-Vallespin1, Choukri Mekkaoui2, Peter Gatehouse1, Timothy G. Reese2, Jenny Keegan1, Steve Collins1, Peter Speier3, Thorsten Feiweier3, Ranil de Silva1, Marcel P. Jackowski4, David E. Sosnovik2, David Firmin1

1Royal Brompton Hospital, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom; 2Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, United States; 3Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Germany; 4Institute of Mathematics and Statistics, University of São Paulo, Brazil

A novel modification of a prospective navigator technique was implemented to allow free-breathing (FB) in vivo DTI of the heart to be performed. 11 healthy volunteers were scanned on two different days; each day using both FB and breathhold (BH) diffusion-weighted stimulated-echo single-shot EPI protocols. Images were post-processed to derive mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy maps. Statistical analysis showed no significant differences between the BH and FB techniques for FA, and no major increase in scan duration. We show here for the first time that a free-breathing navigator-based approach to DTI produces high quality in vivo images of the heart.

 

15:15           0087.Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Modeling Applied to Cardiac Diffusion Weighted MRI: Toward Free Breathing Acquisition in Healthy Volunteers

MAGNA25Bénédicte MA Delattre1, Magalie Viallon2, Hui Xue3, Marie-Pierre Jolly3, Christoph Guetter3, Hongjiang Wei1, Yuemin Zhu1, Thorsten Feiweier4, Vinay M. Pai5, Han Wen5, Pierre Croisille1, 6

1CREATIS, CNRS (UMR 5220), INSERM (U1044), INSA Lyon, University of Lyon, Lyon, France; 2Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland; 3Siemens Corporate Research, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, United States; 4Siemens Healthcare , Erlangen, Germany; 5Imaging Physics Lab, BBC/NHLBI/NIH, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, United States; 6Jean-Monnet University, Saint-Etienne, France

Intravoxel Incoherent Motion (IVIM) model is currently a unique method for evaluating perfusion and diffusion parameters from DWI without the use of any contrast agent. Recently, an efficient cardiac DWI method was proposed where motion-induced signal-loss was compensated for by PCATMIP post-processing. While performing cardiac DWI acquisition using breath-hold yields accurate IVIM parameters, it can be difficult to apply in clinical routine. This study compares the IVIM parameters of perfusion fraction, diffusion coefficient and pseudo-diffusion coefficient estimated from PCATMIP-processed breath-hold and free breathing acquisitions. The results yield the possibility for acquiring perfusion measurements using free-breathing exams under non-contrast conditions.

 

15:27           0088.Apparent Diffusion Coefficient of Intramyocelluler Lipid in Heart Muscle

Victor B. Xie1, 2, Peng Cao1, 2, Zhong wei Qiao1, 2, Anna M. Wang1, 2, Shujuan Fan1, 2, Ed X. Wu1, 2

1Laboratory of Biomedical Imaging and Signal Processing, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China; 2Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China

In this study, we investigated the intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) diffusion property in heart muscle. IMCL ADC was documented in fresh heart muscle samples at 80ms diffusion time, exhibiting slow and largely isotropic diffusion. IMCL ADC was found to be lower than that in skeletal muscle, which likely resulted from the smaller IMCL droplet size, i.e., more restricted diffusion. Such diffusion characterization of IMCL heart muscle may provide insights in study of the IMCL droplet microstructure and lipid dynamics in heart muscle.

 

15:39           0089.An Integrated Pencil-Beam Probe for Assessing the Arterial Input Function in Quantitative 3D Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

Lukas Wissmann1, Johannes F.M. Schmidt1, Robert Manka1, 2, Sebastian Kozerke1

1Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University and ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 2Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland

The tracer dose in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging is crucial for myocardial perfusion quantification. Higher dose is beneficial for myocardial signal-to-noise ratio, but increases the risk of left-ventricular signal saturation in the image due to shorter T1. This study introduces a new acquisition method for the arterial input function using a pencil-beam probe. It is demonstrated that signal saturation in the probe can be avoided by reducing the delay after the saturation pulse. Perfusion quantification from 3D perfusion imaging with the pencil beam probe versus image based assessment of the arterial input function at half and full dose is shown.

 

15:51           0090.Improved Cardiac Triggering by Combining Multiple Physiological Signals: A Cardiac MR Feasibility Study at 7.0 T

Tobias Frauenrath1, Katharina Fuchs2, Fabian Hezel1, Matthias Alexander Dieringer1, 3, Jan Rieger1, 4, Thoralf Niendorf1, 3

1Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany; 2Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany; 3Experimental and Clinical Research Center (ECRC), Charité Campus Buch, Humboldt-University, Berlin, Germany; 4MRI.TOOLS GmbH, Berlin, Germany

Motivated by the challenges and limitations of conventional single physio-information systems like ECG, this study presents the advantages of combining two trigger methods into one trigger output. The approach is demonstrated for cardiac LV function assessment at 7.0T.

 

16:03           0091.Assessment of Tissue Hypoxia & Vascular Reserve in a Porcine HindLimb Ischemia Model Using BOLD-MRI

Smita Sampath1, Mitchel Stacy2, Mark W. Maxfield2, Prasanta Pal, Donald P. Dione2, Albert J. Sinusas2

1Diagnostic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT, United States; 2Cardiology, Yale University

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a degenerative condition that can result in limb ischemia with associated limited mobility, and morbidity. Understanding the extent of hypoxia and regional vascular reserve may help identify treatment regimens that can improve long-term mobility in these patients. We present an investigative study that quantifies, using BOLD MRI, 1) tissue hypoxia and 2) functional vascular reserve in response to distal cuff occlusion and infusion of pharmacological vasodilatory agent, in a porcine animal model with hindlimb ischemia. Differential response between normal leg and ischemic leg are observed in select muscle groups.

 

Normal Developing Human Brain - Advanced Imaging

 

Room 212-213 14:15-16:15            Moderators: Patricia Ellen Grant & Stephen E. Rose

14:15           0092.Defining the Structural Basis of the Radial Coherence of Diffusion Tractography in the Human Fetal Telencephalon: Insights from Neuroanatomic Correlations

Emi Takahashi1, 2, Gang Xu3, Rebecca D. Folkerth4, Robin L. Haynes3, Joseph J. Volpe5, Hannah C. Kinney3, Patricia Ellen Grant1, 2

1Newborn Medicine, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; 2Fetal-Neonatal Neuroimaging & Developmental Science Center, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, MA, United States; 3Pathology, Children’s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School; 4Pathology, Division of Neuropathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School; 5Neurology, Children’s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School

We aimed to define through a correlative HARDI- and immunohistochemical analyses the neuroanatomic basis of transient radial coherence of the telencephalic wall that extends from the lateral ventricle to the pial surface. Our data suggest that HARDI-determined radial coherence in the fetal white matter from approximately 20 to 30 weeks reflects radial glial fibers, radially oriented chains of migrating neuroblasts, and a subset of radially oriented, immature axons in combination. This study provides important baseline for the interpretation of radial coherence in the clinical assessment of preterm infants at risk for encephalopathy of prematurity and radial glial fiber injury.

 

14:27           0093.Assessment of Microstructural White Matter Changes During Early Development with Non-Gaussian Diffusion MRI

MAGNA25Els Fieremans1, Vitria Adisetiyo1, Amir Paydar1, Hetal Sheth1, John Nwankwo1, Jens H. Jensen, 12, Sarah Milla1

1Center for Biomedical Imaging, Radiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, United States; 2Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States

White matter microstructural changes during the first two years of healthy brain development are characterized in terms of non-Gaussian diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI) parameters. The observed significant non-linear age-related changes in the DKI-parameters suggest an increased sensitivity to brain maturation as compared to standard Gaussian diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). In addition, specific measures of white matter integrity can be derived from DKI, of which significant age-related changes were detected for the axonal water fraction and tortuosity, both markers for myelination, while the intracellular and extracellular diffusivities do not change appreciably in normal brain development.

 

14:39           0094.Interaction of Cortex & White Matter During Development Accessed by Cortical Thickness & Microstructure of Projected Axons

Tina Jeon1, Virendra Mishra1, Yong He2, Hao Huang1, 3

1Advanced Imaging Research Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States; 2State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China; 3Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States

Cellular activities occurring in the cortex during development can drive the structural changes of not only cortex but also white matter. The interaction between cortex and white matter may be accessed with microstructural measurements of white matter traced from this cortical region. In this paper, , we parcellated the cortex into 66 gyri and measured the fractional anisotropy (FA) of white matter tracts projected from the local cortex with a certain gyral label with DTI tractography from data of 26 normal children. Significant negative correlations of thickness and FA of traced white matter were found in most of frontal gyri.

 

14:51           0095.Analysing the Cortical Folding Pattern of Very Preterm Neonates Scanned at Term-Equivalent Age: Correlations with Diffusion Tensor Tractography

Andrew Melbourne1, Giles S. Kendall2, Manuel J. Cardoso1, Nicola J. Robertson2, Neil Marlow2, Sebastien Ourselin1

1University College London, London, United Kingdom; 2University College Hospital, London, United Kingdom

Infants born prematurely are at increased risk of adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes. Independent advances suggest that measurement of white matter structure and cortical surface features can help in defining biomarkers for neurodevelopmental outcome. This work analyses 18high resolution T1-weighted term-equivalent MRI of very preterm neonates (<32weeks gestation) and corresponding diffusion tensor imaging (30 directions). This work develops a methodology to link the cortical folding pattern with the underlying white matter connection pattern, thus the spatial surface pattern might allow inference on the connectivity and thus the integrity of the deep grey matter.

 

15:03           0096.Integrity of Callosal Motor Pathways Correlates with Motor-Related Function in Term-Equivalent Neonates

Kerstin Pannek1, Giulia D'Acunto2, Andrea Guzzetta3, Simon Finnigan1, Preethi Mathew1, Roslyn Boyd1, Paul Colditz1, Stephen Rose1

1The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; 2University of Pisa, Italy; 3Stella Maris Scientific Institute, Italy

Preterm birth carries an increased risk of impaired motor function. We used a fully automated tractography technique to delineate interhemispheric motor connections in very preterm infants at term equivalent age and term born neonates. Measures of white matter integrity within the volume of the tracks correlated with clinical motor scores; however measures of white matter integrity on the midsagittal plane alone did not reveal significant correlations. This study describes a fully automated tractography technique for extracting commissural tracks in neonates, and highlights the importance of assessing white matter integrity within tracks, rather than on a single slice.

 

15:15           0097.Bedside Diffuse Optical Tomography of Resting-State Functional Connectivity in Neonates

Silvina L. Ferradal1, Steve M. Liao2, Adam T. Eggebrecht3, Terrie E. Inder2, Joseph P. Culver3

1Biomedical Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, Saint Louis, MO, United States; 2Pediatrics, Washington University in St. Louis, Saint Louis, United States; 3Radiology, Washington University in St. Louis, Saint Louis, United States

Adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm infants are still a clinical concern. Resting-state functional connectivity methods provide an approach to detect functional deficits in the neonatal brain. DOT provides a portable alternative for studying brain function at the bedside. Having previously developed fcDOT methods in adults, we apply these techniques for studying functional connectivity in hospitalized infants. Herein, we present fcDOT maps obtained for 6 healthy term-equivalent premature infants. Our results represent the first steps towards establishing a normative data set for fcDOT and serve as a basis to establish fcDOT as a bedside tool to monitor infant brain function.

 

15:27           0098.Mapping Functional Connectome Changes of the Human Brain Across the Life Span

Miao Cao1, Zhengjia Dai1, Fengmei Fan2, Lili Jiang2, Xiaoyan Cao2, Mingrui Xia1, Ni Shu1, Xinian Zuo2, Yong He1

1National Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China; 2Institue of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China

Uncovering the lifespan changes of the human brain is crucial in discovery neuroscience. The lifespan trajectory coding both normal developing and aging stages of the brain has reflected dramatic changes both its structure and function. It has been commonly accepted that human brain is structurally and functionally organized into a complex network allowing the segregation and integration of information processing. However, how the brain network is reorganized through the lifespan has been rarely studied. Here, we used resting-state fMRI and graph-theory methods to map the lifespan trajectory of human whole-brain functional networks in 150 healthy subjects (7-85 years old).

 

15:39           0099.Resting State CBF with PASL in Developing Brains

Feng Liu1, 2, Yunsuo Duan1, 2, Bradley S. Peterson1, 2, Alayar Kangarlu1, 2

1Columbia University, New York, NY, United States; 2New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, United States

Studying the characteristics of cerebral blood flow (CBF) during resting state can help us understand the functional connectivity of the developing brain. We have collected pulsed ASL data for 28 healthy subjects from young children to adolescence (aged from 6 to 20 years old). We studied the static CBF maps during resting state and also used ROI seed-based analysis on the CBF time series to analyze brain connectivity. By showing the changing characteristics of CBF in differing age groups, we are able to better understand the development of brain connectivity.

 

15:51           0100.Age-Related Iron Deposition in Deep Gray Nuclei in Infants Detected by 1.5T MRI:R2* Versus Susceptibility Phase Values

Ning Ning1, Lei Zhang1, 2, Yumiao Zhang1, Zhuanqin Ren2, Ed.X Wu3, Jian Yang1

1Department of radiology, the first affiliated hospital of medical college, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi, China; 2Department of magnetic resonance imaging, Baoji central hospital, Baoji, Shaanxi, China; 3Laboratory of Biomedical Imaging and Signal Processing, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China

This study aims to evaluate the R2* and susceptibility phase values of deep gray nuclei in infants for study of early brain development by using susceptibility weighted imaging. 56 infants with postmenstrual age (PMA) range of 37-91 weeks were examined by using an ESWAN (enhanced T2* weighted angiography) sequence. R2* and phase values were obtained for caudate nucleus, putamen, globus pallidus, thalamus, red nucleus and substantia nigra. R2* values showed a significant and positive correlation with PMA, as well as the reference iron concentrations calculated using an empirical equation that was derived in an earlier postmortem study. No significant linear correlation was observed between phase value, PMA and iron concentrations in each gray matter structure. Therefore, R2* presents a more sensitive parameter than phase value for in vivo estimation of brain iron deposition in infants.

 

16:03           0101.Intracranial Compliance Study by Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Newborns & Children

Cyrille Capel1, Catherine Gondry-Jouet2, Bénédicte Krejpowicz3, Véronique Courtois3, Malek Makki4, Roger Bouzerar1, Olivier Baledent1

1Image Processing Unit, University Hospital, Amiens, France; 2Radiology, University Hospital, Amiens, France; 3Ecole supérieure d'ostéopathie et de biomécanique, Ostéobio, Paris, France; 4MRI Research Center, University Chidlren Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland

We applied 2D cine-PC MRI to investigate the intracranial compliance of 29 healthy term neonates and children. Cerebral blood volume expansion, during cardiac cycle, was calculated from internal carotid and vertebral arteries and jugular veins' flows. The cerebrospinal fluid volume flushing out of the cranium owing to intracranial pressure increase was measured at the cervical level. An index of intracranial compliance, defined as the ratio of blood and CSF volume changes during the cardiac cycle, was calculated. We have demonstrated that intracranial compliance variations during the first months of life could be studied using PCMRI

 

Emerging Body MR Techniques .

Room 219-220 14:15-16:15            Moderators: Brian A. Hargreaves & Claude B. Sirlin

14:15           0102.Multi-Peak Spectral Modeling of Fat Is Necessary for Both Accurate Liver Fat & Iron Quantification: A Biopsy-MRI Correlation Study

Jens-Peter Kühn1, 2, Diego Hernando1, Norbert Hosten2, Scott B. Reeder1, 3

1Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research USA, Madison, WI, United States; 2Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Greifswald, Greifswald, MV, Germany; 3Medical Physics, Biomedical Engineering and Medicine, Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research USA, Madison, WI, United States

Chemical shift-encoded MRI methods provide measures of liver fat, and also R2*, a biomarker for hepatic iron content. Previous works have shown that correcting for the spectral complexity of fat (“multi-peak” modeling) is necessary for accurate fat quantification, however it is unknown whether it is necessary for accurate iron quantification. In this work, we investigated the impact of multi-peak fat modeling on R2* measurements to assess hepatic iron content, using biopsy as reference standard. In the presence of fat, single-peak fat modeling results in clinically significant errors in R2* quantification. Multi-peak fat modeling removes these errors and is necessary for accurate hepatic iron quantification.

 

14:27           0103.Tagged MRI of the Liver in the Diagnosis of Liver Cirrhosis, Preliminary Study.

Lorenzo Mannelli1, Christopher A. Potter1, Theodore J. Dubinsky1, Orpheus Kolokythas1, Manjiri K. Dighe1, Jeffrey H. Maki1

1University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States

The tag-MRI technique is routinely used to quantify myocardial muscle contractility by measuring myocardial strain after application of tags. Tissue strain and stiffness are inversely proportional in that the stiffer a tissue is, the less deformable it becomes. The principal strain represents the amount of the greatest elongation or stretch of the tissue at a given location. Since the liver becomes increasingly stiffer as chronic liver disease progresses, increments in liver stiffness should be reflected by changes in liver strain, which can be quantified using tag-MRI.

 

14:39           0104.Optimized Caipirinha Acceleration Patterns for Routine Clinical 3D Imaging

Vibhas Deshpande1, Dominik Nickel2, Randall Kroeker3, Stephan Kannengiesser2, Gerhard Laub1

1Siemens Healthcare, San Francisco, CA, United States; 2Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany; 3Siemens Healthcare, Winnipeg, Canada

Shortening scan time in abdominal breath-hold VIBE imaging is important for patient comfort and consistent diagnostic results in sick or uncooperative patients. In this work, a recently proposed parallel imaging method, Caipirinha, was evaluated against standard GRAPPA to find an optimal sampling pattern. Caipirinha reduces g-factor related SNR losses and controls aliasing such that higher accelerations can be used with little compromises in image quality. Caipirinha showed very good results with accelerations 3 and 4, and improvements over GRAPPA. For a typical abdominal exam setup, a 131 pattern (total acceleration=3) pattern was found to be most consistent across all subjects.

 

14:51           0105.Clinical Performance & Validation of a Compressed Sensing Contrast Enhanced MRI with Fast Image Reconstruction

Shilpy Chowdhury1, Tao Zhang2, Richard A. Barth1, Michael Lustig3, Mark Murphy3, Marcus T. Alley1, Thomas Grafendorfer4, Paul Calderon5, John M. Pauly2, Brian A. Hargreaves1, Shreyas S. Vasanawala1

1Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States; 2Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States; 3Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, United States; 4ATD Coils, GE Healthcare, Stanford, CA, United States; 5MR Hardware Engineering,GE Healthcare, Fremont, CA, United States

Pediatric abdominal MRI is challenged by small anatomical structures and physiologic motion. We assessed performance and clinical validation of a new compressed sensing algorithm in 29 consecutive patients, that permits rapid reconstruction even with high-density coils. A 3D SPGR sequence with intermittent fat suppression and Poisson-disc variable density k-space sampling was developed. 3 reconstructions included parallel imaging (ARC), compression sensing (L1-SPIRiT) and coil compressed (CC) L1-SPIRiT. CC-L1-SPIRiT showed better image quality performance for most qualitative assessments. Compressed sensing with fast image reconstruction is feasible in a pediatric clinical environment and can improve quality of structural delineation in pediatric MRI.

 

15:03           0106.Characterization of Small Liver Lesions Using Partial Volume Corrected T2 Estimates Obtained from Highly Undersampled Radial Fast Spin Echo Data Via PURIFY

MAGNA25Chuan Huang1, Jean-Philipper Galons2, Maria I. Altbach2

1Mathematics, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, United States; 2Radiology, University of Arizona

T2 estimation has proven to be a valuable tool in the characterization of liver lesions. Because of the partial volume effect, it is particularly challenging to obtain T2 values of lesions with diameters smaller than 15 mm. In this work we present a joint bi-exponential fitting (JBF) algorithm combined with a principal component based reconstruction algorithm to obtain accurate T2 estimates with partial volume correction. The method, which utilizes highly undersampled radial data acquired in a single breath hold, is demonstrated in phantoms and in vivo.

 

15:15           0107.Combined Dual Frequency 19F and 1H MRI in the Human Digestive Tract

Tobias Hahn1, Ruben Pellicer Guridi1, 2, Werner Schwizer3, Sebastian Kozerke1, Michael Fried3, Peter Boesiger1, Andreas Steingoetter1, 3

1Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University and ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 2Department of Biophysics and Bioengineering, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 3Dep. of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Zurich, Switzerland

This study presents the 3D tracking of fluorine labeled capsules through the human intestinal tract using a dual frequency excitation scheme with a temporal resolution of 255ms. Liquid fluorine markers were Hexafluorobenzene and Perfluoro-15-crown-5-ether and capsule filling was 65µl each. The study was performed in five healthy volunteers on two study days. Initial results are shown regarding the temporal and structural behavior of the capsule passages through the digestive tract.

 

15:27           0108.Overcoming the Low Relaxivity of Gadofosveset at High Field with Spin Locking

Owen C. Richardson1, Marietta Scott2, Steven F. Tanner1, John C. Waterton2, David L. Buckley1

1Division of Medical Physics, University of Leeds, Leeds, West Yorkshire, United Kingdom; 2Imaging, Personalised Healthcare and Biomarkers, AstraZeneca, Macclesfield, Cheshire, United Kingdom

Gadofosveset binds reversibly to serum albumin (SA), and has a high longitudinal relaxivity at lower magnetic fields (¡Ü 3.0 T) but a much lower relaxivity at high fields. Spin locking (SL) is sensitive to macromolecular content; it is hypothesised that combining SL with albumin binding may enable increased gadofosveset relaxivity at high fields. In Vitro measurements at 4.7 T found significantly higher SL relaxation rates, R1¦Ñ (1/T1¦Ñ), when gadofosveset was SA-bound than when unbound. R1¦Ñ values for a non-binding contrast agent (gadopentetate) in SA were similar to unbound gadofosveset. SL at high field generates significantly higher relaxation rates for gadofosveset than conventional agents, and may enable differentiation of free and bound molecules at these field strengths.

 

15:39           0109.Noninvasive Investigation of Iron Elimination from the Liver Following Ferumoxytol Administration

Pippa Storey1, Hersh Chandarana1, Andrew B. Rosenkrantz1, David R. Stoffel1, Ruth P. Lim1, Vivian S. Lee1, 2

1Radiology Department, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, United States; 2University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, United States

 

The recent approval of Feraheme (ferumoxytol) for human use in the USA has increased interest in the use of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles as MRI contrast agents. USPIO particles have a wide range of potential applications, both overlapping with and complementary to those of gadolinium. However, an important consideration is their elimination time. We used T2* mapping to investigate the elimination of iron from the liver following administration of ferumoxytol (5mg/kg Fe) in six healthy volunteers. Elimination times varied widely among subjects, from less than 3 months in one person to longer than 11 months in three people.

 

15:51           0110.Combined IVIM & DTI for Simultaneous Assessment of Diffusion & Flow Anisotropy of the Kidney

MAGNA25Mike Notohamiprodjo1, 2, Hersh Chandarana3, Artem Mikheev2, Jose Garcia Raya2, John Grinstead4, Thorsten Feiweier4, Henry Rusinek3, Vivian S. Lee, 35, Eric E. Sigmund2

1Department of Clinical Radiology, University Hospitals Munich, Munich, Bavaria, Germany; 2Center for Biomedical Imaging, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York City, NY, United States; 3Department of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center; 4Siemens Healthcare; 5University of Utah Health Care

We used a combined IVIM-DTI methodology to resolve the ambiguity of renal diffusion anisotropy by distinguishing structural from flow effects. We observe a significantly higher perfusion-fraction (fp) of the cortex than medulla, contrary to previous studies finding comparable fp in both tissues. Higher medullary FA at the low b-value range and high directional variance of medullary fp suggest anisotropy of the perfusion-fraction. Similarly, both flow and diffusion appear to contribute to the diffusion anisotropy of the renal medulla. This novel method may be useful in separating decreased tubular flow from irreversible structural tubular damage, e.g. in diabetic nephropathy.

 

16:03           0111.Ultra-Fast Steady State Free Precession & Its Application to in vivo 1H Lung Imaging

Oliver Bieri1

1Division of Radiological Physics, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Basel Hospital, Basel, Switzerland

Ultra-fast steady state free precession (SSFP) imaging refers to Cartesian SSFP imaging protocols using repetition times close to 1ms, as can be achieved with clinical whole body systems by fully exploiting and optimizing gradient switching patterns and RF pulse settings in combination with asymmetric echo readouts. Typically, an isotropic resolution of ~1.8mm can be achieved with repetition times TR ~ 1.4ms (TE ~ 0.5ms), providing high-resolution 3D artifact free balanced SSFP images even for targets with severe susceptibility variations, such as the lung.

 

Educational Course

Pediatric Infection & Inflammation

Organizers: Marco Essig, M.D., Ph.D., Rakesh K. Gupta, M.D., Robia G. Pautler, Ph.D. & Maria A. Rocca, M.D.

Room 105-106 14:15-16:15            Moderator: Marco Essig, M.D., Ph.D.

14:15           . Pediatric Infections

Simone A. Mandelstam, F.C.R.A.D.(D)S.A., F.R.A.N.Z.C.R..

 

14:55           . Prenatal Infection

Nadine J. Girard, M.D.

 

15:35           . Acute Demyelination

Yukio Miki, M.D., Ph.D.

 

16:15           . Adjournment

 

Educational Course

Electromagnetic Tissue Property Mapping with Magnetic Resonance

Organizers: Daniel K. Sodickson, M.D., Ph.D. & Simon K. Warfield, Ph.D.

Room 109-110 14:15-16:15            Moderators: E. Mark Haacke, Ph.D. & Simon K. Warfield, Ph.D.

Prologue & Exhortation

14:15           . Electromagnetic Tissue Properties Then & Now

E. Mark Haacke, Ph.D.

 

14:25           . From Artifact to State of the Art: An Introduction to Electromagnetic Tissue Property Mapping

Daniel K. Sodickson, M.D., Ph.D.

 

14:45           . EPT: Electrical Properties from RF Field Measurements

Ulrich Katscher, Ph.D.

 

15:10           . MREIT: Electrical Properties from Applied Currents

Eung Je Woo, Ph.D.

 

15:35           . QSM: Magnetic Properties from Field Measurements

Yi Wang, Ph.D.

 

16:00           . Surveying the Field: Hot Topics & Latest Results - 3-Minute Surveys

Astrid L. H. M. van Lier, M.Sc.

 

16:03           . Surveying the Field: Hot Topics & Latest Results - 3-Minute Surveys

Xiaotong Zhang, Ph.D.

 

16:06           . Surveying the Field: Hot Topics & Latest Results - 3-Minute Surveys

L. Tugan Muftuler, Ph.D.

 

16:09           . Surveying the Field: Hot Topics & Latest Results - 3-Minute Surveys

Chunlei Liu, Ph.D.

 

16:12           . Surveying the Field: Hot Topics & Latest Results - 3-Minute Surveys

Jürgen R. Reichenbach, Ph.D.

 

16:15           . Adjournment

 

Clinical Intensive Course

ISMRM/SMRT Joint Forum: Parametric Mapping of Cartilage

Organizers: Garry E. Gold, M.D. & Michael D. Macilquham, M.H.Sc.(MRI), B.App.Sc.

Room 202 14:15-16:15            Moderators: Garry E. Gold, M.D & Michael D. Macilquham, M.H.Sc.(MRI), B.App.Sc.

14:15           . Physics of Relaxation Time Mapping in Cartilage

Bernard J. Dardzinski, Ph.D.

 

14:45           . Technologist Perspective

Dominic W. Kennedy, B.App.Sci.

 

15:15           . Clinical Perspective

Hollis G. Potter, M.D.

 

16:15           . Adjournment

 

 

Traditional Poster Session: Pulse Sequence & Reconstruction A

Exhibition Hall 16:30-18:30           

 

Electronic Poster Session: Neuro A

Exhibition Hall 16:30-18:30           

 

Study Group Session: Musculoskeletal MR; Body (ad-hoc)

Room 203-204 16:30-18:30           

 

Diffusion Acquisition

Plenary Hall 16:30-18:30            Moderators: Roland Bammer & Jennifer A. McNab

16:30           0112.Elimination of DWI Signal Dropouts Using Blipped Gradients for Dynamic Restoration of Gradient Moment

SUMMA25Kazim Gumus1, Benedikt Poser1, Brian Keating1, Brian Armstrong2, Julian Maclaren3, Thomas Prieto4, Oliver Speck5, Maxim Zaitsev6, Thomas Ernst1

1John A. Burns School of Medicine, U. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, United States; 2Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer, U. of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI, United States; 3Dept. of Radiology, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany; 4Neurology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Wauwatosa, WI, United States; 5Dept. Biomedical Magnetic Resonance, Otto-von-Guericke-University, Magdeburg, Germany; 6Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany

Intra-scan head motion causes signal dropouts in DWI. A new method is presented to eliminate such artifacts. We used a Moiré-Phase-Target based tracking system to measure head motion between excitation and acquisition. Knowing also the timing and amplitudes of gradients, we determined the motion-induced residual gradient moment (M) and restored the gradient balance prior to readout by applying a blip gradient of moment -M. The method was tested on two volunteers who performed intentional head movements. Gradient moment correction successfully eliminated signal dropouts compared to scans without correction. This method should be feasible on most modern scanner platforms.

 

16:42           0113.EPI Navigator Based Prospective Motion Correction Technique for Diffusion Neuroimaging.

Himanshu Bhat1, M. Dylan Tisdall2, Andre Jan Willem van der Kouwe2, Thorsten Feiweier3, Keith Heberlein1

1Siemens Medical Solutions USA Inc., Charlestown, MA, United States; 2A. A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, United States; 3Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany

In this work we developed a novel prospective motion correction method for multi-slice single shot diffusion weighted EPI. Rigid body navigation is achieved using non diffusion encoded low resolution single shot EPI images as motion navigators during the diffusion scan. Two approaches: integrated and interleaved are described. The proposed methods work independent of the b-value used and do not need retrospective adjustment of the b-matrix. The compromise for the integrated method is the TE and TR increase and the corresponding signal decrease while the interleaved method requires only a small (~10%) increase in minimum TR.

 

16:54           0114.MR-Based & Optical Prospective Motion Correction for High Resolution DWI with RS-EPI

Murat Aksoy1, Melvyn Ooi1, Samantha J. Holdsworth1, Rafael O'Halloran1, Roland Bammer1

1Center for Quantitative Neuroimaging, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States

Two prospective motion correction techniques for high resolution diffusion-weighted imaging are compared for readout-segmented (RS) EPI. The first uses 3D registration of low resolution navigator images and the second uses a camera mounted in the scanner bore to correct for motion between k-space segments. Results show that both techniques are effective in eliminating head motion between blinds of the RS-EPI readout, however, optical tracking has advantages because it needs less rescanning, is not vulnerable to intra-volume motion and optically obtained motion estimates are robust to ghosting artifacts.

 

17:06           0115.In Vivo Correction of Non-Linear Phase Patterns for Diffusion-Weighted FSE Imaging Using Tailored RF Excitation Pulses

Rita G. Nunes1, 2, Shaihan J. Malik3, Joseph V. Hajnal3

1Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal; 2Robert Steiner MRI Unit, Imaging Sciences Department, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; 3Robert Steiner MRI Unit, Imaging Sciences Department, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre,, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom

Unlike Echo-planar imaging, single-shot fast spin-echo is insensitive to field inhomogeneities but it requires precise control of the phase of the magnetization prior to the start of the refocusing train (CPMG condition). Due to motion, this is very difficult to achieve when diffusion-weighting is applied in vivo. Previously it has been shown that linear phase errors can be measured and corrected for in real time using gradients. The remaining non-linear phase modulations can be prospectively corrected using tailored RF excitation pulses as demonstrated on phantoms. Here the method is further developed and shown to be effective for in vivo imaging.

 

17:18           0116.Reduction of Diffusion-Weighted Readout-Segmented EPI Scan Time Using a Blipped-CAIPI Modification

Robert Frost1, David A. Porter2, Gwenaelle Douaud1, Peter Jezzard1, Karla L. Miller1

1FMRIB Centre, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; 2Healthcare Sector, Siemens AG, Erlangen, Germany

Readout-segmented EPI (rs-EPI) for diffusion imaging reduces distortion and T2* blurring and enables higher resolution relative to single-shot EPI (ss-EPI). However, the long scan times caused by segmenting the acquisition of k-space limit the number of slices and/or diffusion directions. A blipped-CAIPI multiband modification to rs-EPI has the potential to address the scan time issue and is demonstrated here with slice acceleration factor two. Trace-weighted images with 0.9x0.9x4mm resolution acquired in clinically relevant scan times are presented. Diffusion tractography is compared from data acquired at 2 and 1.5mm isotropic resolution for rs- and ss-EPI.

 

17:30           0117.2D Navigated 3D Multi-Slab DWI at 1.3 Mm Isotropic Resolution

MAGNA25Mathias Engström1, Roland Bammer2, Stefan Skare1

1Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; 2Radiological Sciences Laboratory, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, United States

In this work we present a method to do diffusion weighted imaging at 1.3 mm isotropic resolution with full brain coverage, using multi-slab multi-echo spin echo-EPI. We also suggest a method on how to correct for diffusion gradient induced phase for multi-slab acquisitions along with slab profile intensity optimization.

 

17:42           0118.3D Diffusion-Weighted MRI with SSFP: Rigid- And Non-Rigid-Body Phase Correction

Rafael O'Halloran1, Murat Aksoy1, Roland Bammer1

1Radiology, Stanford Universtiy, Stanford, CA, United States

The main obstacle to high-resolution 3D diffusion-weighted MRI is the motion-induced phase error. In this work the phase error is addressed with a hybrid 3D navigator approach that corrects phase induced by rigid-body motion for every shot and phase induced by repeatable non-rigid-body pulsation over the cardiac cycle. This phase correction method was shown to mitigate signal dropouts caused by shot-to-shot phase inconsistencies compared to a standard gridding reconstruction in healthy volunteers. The 3D SSFP approach was also compared to 2D DW-EPI and shown to have similar diffusion contrast.

 

17:54           0119.Turboprop+': Enhanced Turboprop DWI with a New Phase Correction

Chu-Yu Lee1, 2, Zhiqiang Li3, James G. Pipe2, Josef P. Debbins, 12

1Electrical Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, United States; 2Neuroimaging Research, Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ, United States; 3MR engineering, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI, United States

Compared with conventional (multishot FSE) DW-PROPELLER, Turboprop gives increased sampling efficiency, a wider self-navigated region, and reduced specific absorption rate (SAR) by incorporating the GRASE readout to collect gradient echoes around the primary spin-echo. However, phase errors using the GRASE readout, which are exacerbated with preceding large diffusion gradients, induce image artifacts in Turboprop. To mitigate this issue, X-prop and Steer-prop techniques have been proposed, which keep the gradient echoes encoded into separate blades. In this work, we introduced a method to correct the off-resonance phase in Turboprop, called ¡¥Turboprop+¡¦. The results suggest that Turboprop+ has greater immunity to the artifacts from off-resonance phase, compared with X-prop.

 

18:06           0120.Water-Fat Separation in Diffusion-Weighted MRI Using an EPI-IDEAL Approach

Jedrzej Burakiewicz1, Geoffrey David Charles-Edwards1, 2, Vicky Goh1, 2, Tobias Schaeffter1

1King's College London, London, United Kingdom; 2Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom

Effective fat suppression can significantly extend the acquisition time in EPI-based diffusion MRI outside the brain. We present a single-shot diffusion-weighted EPI in combination with IDEAL method for fat-water sepa-ration utilising the inherent signal averaging from the chemical shift encoding. We utilise a B0 map acquired without diffusion weighting to demodulate images at higher b-values before reconstruction to improve the wa-ter-fat separation. This technique was tested in phantom and healthy volunteers.

 

18:18           0121.Multiple Echo Diffusion Tensor Acquisition Technique (MEDITATE) Implementation on 3T Clinical Scanner

Steven Baete1, Gene Cho1, 2, Eric E. Sigmund1

1Center for Biomedical Imaging, Dept. of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, United States; 2Sackler Institute of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY, United States

This abstract describes the implementation of a rapid method to acquire a full diffusion tensor in on a clinical scanner. The method is named the 3D multiple modulation multiple echo diffusion tensor acquisition technique (MEDITATE). MEDITATE employs four rf-pulses and a pattern of diffusion gradients on three gradient axes to encode a train of 17 echoes with different diffusion weightings and directions. The resulting diffusion weighted signals can be used to estimate DTI parameters as demonstrated in a fibrous phantom. This sequence may be useful in clinical applications requiring time-sensitive acquisition of DTI parameters such as dynamical DTI in muscle.

 

Psychiatric Disorders

Room 109-110 16:30-18:30            Moderators: Stefan Sunaert & Murat Yucel

16:30           0122.White Matter Microstructural Changes in Bipolar Disorder: A HARDI CSD Tractography Study

SUMMA25Louise Emsell1, 2, Alexander Leemans3, Wim Van Hecke4, 5, Camilla Langan2, Gareth J. Barker6, Peter McCarthy2, Stefan Sunaert1, Dara Cannon2, Colm McDonald2

1Radiology, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; 2NUI Galway, Ireland; 3Image Sciences Institute, UMC Utrecht, Netherlands; 4University Hospital Antwerp, Belgium; 5icoMetrix, Belgium; 6Department of Neuroimaging, King's College London,Institute of Psychiatry, United Kingdom

Structural brain changes detected by diffusion tensor tractography have been reported in bipolar disorder. However the investigation of heterogeneous clinical populations and the limitations of the tensor model for tractography have resulted in contradictory findings. We used high angular resolution diffusion imaging and a constrained spherical deconvolution approach to improve tract delineation in crossing-fibre regions. We investigated anatomically defined subdivisions of the corpus callosum, cingulum and fornix in a sample of 35 prospectively confirmed euthymic bipolar 1 disorder patients and 44 healthy controls. We detected widespread reductions in fractional anisotropy and increases in diffusivity measures in patients compared to controls.

 

16:42           0123.Disrupted White-Matter Structural Networks in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Ni Shu1, Qingjiu Cao2, Li Sun2, Li An2, Peng Wang2, Jinhui Wang3, Mingrui Xia3, Yufeng Wang2, Yong He3

1State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University , Beijing, China; 2Institute of Mental Health, Peking University, Beijing, China; 3State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China

In this study, we used diffusion tensor imaging and graph theoretical approaches to investigate the whole-brain white-matter connectional architecture in ADHD patients. We found disrupted topological organization of white¨Cmatter structural networks in ADHD patients. Both decreased and increased connections in the patients were mainly located in the frontal regions, insula and striatum structures, providing evidence for the hypothesis of abnormal fronto-striatal-insular circuitry in ADHD. Specifically, the disrupted connections in the fronto-insular component were associated with the inattention performances in patients, improving our understanding of the potential mechanisms underlying the behavior deficits in patients with ADHD.

 

16:54           0124.Ketamine Decreases Resting State Functional Connectivity between Networks Via the Dorsal Nexus: Implications for Major Depression

SUMMA25Milan Scheidegger1, 2, Martin Walter3, Mick Lehmann2, Coraline Metzger3, Simone Grimm2, 4, Heinz Boeker2, Peter Boesiger1, Erich Seifritz2, Anke Henning1

1Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University and ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 2Clinic of Affective Disorders and General Psychiatry, University Hospital of Psychiatry Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 3Department of Psychiatry, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany; 4Cluster Languages of Emotion, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany

Using resting state fMRI (rsfMRI), the „dorsal nexus“ (DN) was recently identified as a dorsomedial prefrontal cortex region showing increased depression-associated fMRI connectivity with portions of the cognitive control (CCN), the default mode (DMN), and the affective (AN) network. In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study we report decreased connectivity of the sgACC (AN) and PCC (DMN) via the DN 24 hours following the administration of an antidepressant dose of ketamine. We conclude that reducing the hyperconnectivity via the DN may play a critical role in reducing depressive symptomatology and thus represent a systems level mechanism of antidepressant treatment response.

 

17:06           0125.Activation & Deactivation in the Cerebellum in Schizophrenia Studied Using Verbal Working Memory FMRI

Kayako Matsuo1, S.H. Annabel Chen2, Chih-Min Liu3, Chen-Chung Liu3, Hai-Go Hwu3, Wen-Yih I. Tseng1

1National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Division of Psychology, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; 3Department of Psychiatry, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan

We applied verbal working memory (VWM) fMRI to investigate schizophrenia specifically focusing on the cerebellum. We designed high and low load conditions to examine two contrasts: high > low load contrast for the VWM activation, and low > high load contrast for the default mode network (DMN) “deactivation”. The VWM contrast activation overlapped with the Cerebellum VI, Crus I and Vermis. In contrast, the DMN contrast yielded activation in the Crus II of the cerebellum. An extensive “deactivation” observed in the control group but not in the schizophrenia group might be an indicator of the disease.

 

17:18           0126.Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Assisted Diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder Using a Multiparameter Classification Approach Based on Gray Matter Abnormality

Lihua Qiu1, Xiaoqi Huang1, Qizhu Wu1, Shiguang Li1, Su Lui1, Peiyu Huang2, Qiyong Gong1

1Huaxi MR Research Center, Department of Radiology, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China; 2Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China

Past studies applied Support Vector Machine (SVM) using structural MRI data had yielded some promising results in distinguish psychiatric disorders. However, only volumetric information had been consideration in those past studies. In the present study, we use multiparameter(seven morphometric parameters including volumetric and geometric features on grey matter) classification approach to distinguish first-episode, drug-naïve MDD patients from normal controls. Among all parameters, we found cortical thickness measurement showed the highest accuracy in revealing group differences between control and MDD. Current study provided new approach which might be useful for translational application of MRI in future.

 

17:30           0127.Magnetization Transfer Imaging Reveals Subcortical Biophysical Abnormalities in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes & Major Depression

Shaolin Yang1, 2, Olusola Ajilore1, Minjie Wu1, Melissa Lamar1, Anand Kumar1

1Department of Psychiatry, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States; 2Department of Radiology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States

Type 2 diabetes and major depression are disorders that are mutual risk factors. In this study, we examined the brain biophysical abnormalities in patients with both type 2 diabetes and major depression using magnetization transfer imaging. The subject population consisted of 4 groups: patients with type 2 diabetes and major depression, patients with either disease alone, and controls. We found the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) in right head of caudate nucleus was significantly lower in patients with both diseases when compared with controls and the MTRs in patients with either disease alone were also significantly lower but with intermediate values.

 

17:42           0128.Altered Frontostriatal Cortical Functional Connectivity in Heroin-Dependent Individuals: A Resting-State FMRI Study

Yarong Wang1, Jia Zhu2, Qiang Li2, Wei Li2, Ning Wu2, Haifeng Chang2, Ying Zheng2, Wei Wang2

1Department of Radiology, Tangdu Hospital,The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, Shaanxi , China; 2Department of Radiology, Tangdu Hospital,The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, Shaanxi, China

Though MRI studies have associated heroin use with a large scale structural and functional brain abnormalities, few fMRI studies focused on the balance between local neuronal activity and global integrative processes during a resting-state in heroin-dependent individuals (HD). Measurement of amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF) can successfully characterize the nature and extent of signal change underlying spontaneous neuronal activities in HD. This paper strongly emphasizes the association between the heroin-use-induced ALFF alteration and the resting-state functional connectivity of these brain regions, and reveals a heroin-use-related dysfunction of frontostriatal cortical system, the substrate of an impaired inhibitory control in HD.

 

17:54           0129.Long-Term Effects of Antipsychotic Treatment on Cerebral Function in Drug-Naive First-Episode Schizophrenia: A Two Years Longitudinal Study by RfMRI

Fei Li1, Su Lui1, Wei Deng2, Xiaoqi Huang1, Qizhu Wu1, Tao Li2, Qiyong Gong1

1Huaxi MR Research Center (HMRRC), Department of Radiology, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, chengdu, sichuan, China; 2Department of Psychiatry, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China

Our current study demonstrated long-term (2 years) effect of

second-generation antipsychotic drugs on cerebral function of schizophrenia patients using the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rfMRI) signal.

 

18:06           0130.Decreased GABA in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex of Female Borderline Personality Disorder Patients

Gabriele Ende1, Markus Sack1, Nuran Tunc-Skarka1, Wolfgang Weber-Fahr1, Mareen Hoerst1, Anne Krause-Utz2, Anne-Christine Reitz2, Sylvia Cackowski2, Christian Schmahl2

1Neuroimaging, Central Institute of Mental Health, Mannheim, Germany; 2Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Mannheim, Germany

Dysfunction and deficits in the structure of the anterior cingulate cortex as well as increased impulsivity have been reported in borderline personality disorder (BPD). Loss or dysfunction of GABAergic neurotransmission is associated with many neurological and psychiatric conditions. We report first GABA data from the ACC of 20 female BPD patients and 24 female healthy controls from an ongoing study. Two MEGA-PRESS edited spectra were obtained: with and without macromolecule (MM) suppression. Decreased GABA was found in the MM suppressed GABA data concordant with functional deficits observed in BPD patients.

 

18:18           0131.Individualized Mapping of the Subgenual Cingulate in Individual Unipolar Depressed Patients Using fMRI

Leslie Baxter1, Gary Grove2, Ryan Smith1, Perri Handley1, Michael Purcell1, Francisco Ponce3, Robert Spetzler3

1Neuroimaging Research, Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ, United States; 2Private Practice, Scottsdale, AZ, United States; 3Neurosurgery, Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ, United States

Deep Brain Stimulation is a new intervention for treating severe depression; however, response rates may be improved with fMRI if the region in the dysfunctional subgenual cingulate is better targeted. We developed a novel fMRI sadness induction paradigm that collects standardized blocks of data within a “flexible-block” design. Specifically, when subjects attain the targeted emotional state (sad or neutral), they trigger a standardized 30” block through a button press. Only those blocks are analyzed in the post-processing steps. Our preliminary data show that depressed patients can perform this task and generally show greater subgenual responsivity compared to controls.

 

fMRI Connectivity Mechanisms & Methods

Room 201 16:30-18:30            Moderators: Shella D. Keilholz & Alard F. Roebroeck

16:30           0132.The Electrophysiological Basis of Resting State Networks

SUMMA25Matthew Jon Brookes1, Mark Woolrich2, Henry Luckhoo2, Darren Price1, Joanne Hale1, Mary Stephenson1, Gareth Barnes3, Stephen Smith4, Peter Morris1

1Sir Peter Mansfield Magnetic Resonance Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, United Kingdom; 2Oxford centre for human brain activity, University of Oxford, Oxford; 3Wellcome trust centre for neuroimaging, University College London, London; 4Oxford Centre for functional MRI of the brain, University of Oxford, Oxford

BOLD fMRI is capable of delineating functional brain networks with unparalleled spatial resolution. However, it is an indirect measure of ‘brain activity’ and neither rapid temporal dynamics nor the electrophysiological basis of network function can be assessed using fMRI alone. Here, we report the results of a resting state magnetoencephalography (MEG) study that independently identifies multiple brain networks in MEG data. The networks elucidated exhibit significant spatial similarity to networks that have been well characterised by previous fMRI studies. These results confirm the electrophysiological basis of resting-fMRI networks and highlight the utility of a multi-modal approach for future studies.

 

16:42           0133.Resing State FMRI Slow Fluctuations Correlate with the Activity of Fast Cortico-Cortical Physiological Connections

Giacomo Koch1, 2, Marco Bozzali3, Sonia Bonni1, Viola Giacobbe1, Carlo Caltagirone1, 2, Mara Cercignani, 34

1Laboratory of Clinical and Behavioural Neurology, Santa Lucia Foundation, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Neuroscience, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy; 3Neuroimaging Laboratory, Santa Lucia Foundation, Rome, Italy; 4CISC, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, United Kingdom

Multifocal TMS allows the investigation of the causal neurophysiological interactions occurring in specific cortico-cortical connections, and the aim of this work is assessing the correlation between measures of brain connectivity obtained with TMS and resting state fMRI. Results showed that the activity of fast cortico-cortical physiological interactions occurring in the millisecond range correlated selectively with the coupling of fMRI slow oscillations within the same cortical areas that form part of the dorsal attention network. We conclude that resting-state fMRI slow fluctuations are likely to reflect the interaction of underlying physiological cortico-cortical connections

 

16:54           0134.Coupling between BOLD & Electrophysiological Brain Network Measurements

MAGNA25Joanne R. Hale1, Susan T. Francis1, Matthew J. Brookes1, Peter G. Morris1

1SPMMRC, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, United Kingdom

fMRI allows identification of functional brain networks with unparalleled spatial resolution. However, BOLD is an in-direct measure of ‘brain activity’ and thus cannot probe neither the electrophysiological basis nor the most rapid temporal dynamics of network activity. Here we employ parallel BOLD and magnetoencephalography (MEG) experiments to assess the relationship between haemodynamic and electrodynamic measures of network activity during an N-back working memory task. Specifically, we explore coupling between BOLD and â/ã band neural oscillatory signals in the default mode network. Results are in agreement with electrophysiological studies and highlight the benefits of a multi-modal approach to network elucidation.

 

17:06           0135.The Relationship between Functional Connectivity Strength & Cerebral Blood Flow

Xia Liang1, 2, Qihong Zou3, Yong He2, Yihong Yang4

1Neuroimaging Research Branch,, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD, United States; 2State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China; 3MRI Research Center and Beijing City Key Lab for Medical Physics and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, China; 4Neuroimaging Research Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD, United States

We investigated the relationship between functional connectivity strength and cerebral blood flow (CBF) by analyzing a set of resting-state functional BOLD and ASL imaging data collected on the same subjects to test the hypothesis that brain regions with stronger functional connectivity demand more metabolic supply. Our results show that functional connectivity and CBF are highly correlated across voxels as well as across subjects.

 

17:18           0136.Neural Origin of Specificity Change of Functional Connectivity at Different Anesthesia Levels

MAGNA25Xiao Liu1, Xiao-Hong Zhu1, Yi Zhang1, Wei Chen1

1Radiology, Center for Magnetic Resonance Research, Minneapolis, MN, United States

To further understand the mechanism of the specificity change of functional connectivity across anesthesia levels, EEG signals were recorded from rats under different anesthesia conditions using isoflurane. EEG power correlations between electrodes located at different brain regions demonstrated very similar dependencies on anesthesia as BOLD signal correlations observed previously: the correlation strength increased while the spatial specificity decreased from the light to deep anesthesia. The finding provides strong evidence for the neural origin of the change of functional connectivity specificity across different anesthesia levels.

 

17:30           0137.Functional Connectivity Hubs & Modules in Resting-State Rat Brain

Dany V. D'Souza1, Elisabeth Jonckers1, Andreas Bruns2, Basil Kuennecke2, Marleen Verhoye1, Markus von Kienlin2, Annemie van der Linden1, Thomas Mueggler2

1Bio-Imaging Lab, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk, Antwerp, Belgium; 2Translational Neuroscience, CNS, Roche, Switzerland

Graph analysis of resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) data enables characterization of the properties of large-scale brain functional networks both in humans and small animals. Graph measures bearing neurobiological importance are often computed in networks of strong positive associations among brain regions, neglecting the negative associations. We performed rs-fMRI experiments in rats, and constructed a fully connected network of 30 brain regions by retaining all functional connections irrespective of their sign and strength. Applying graph measures we found that rat functional network is segregated into 6 modules associated with known brain functions, and exhibits hubs which might form a network core.

 

17:42           0138.Serial Resting-State fMRI Functional Connectivity Analysis of Normal Rat Brain Development

MAGNA25Kajo van der Marel1, Willem M. Otte1, 2, Umesh S. Rudrapatna1, Annette van der Toorn1, Rick M. Dijkhuizen1

1Biomedical MR Imaging and Spectroscopy Group, Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands; 2Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands

Brain function maturation is increasingly studied with resting-state fMRI functional connectivity (RSFC) analysis, to further our understanding of developmental alterations underlying neuropsychiatric illness. As RSFC is routinely measured in rodents, we extended human cross-sectional studies by characterizing functional development from serial RSFC measurements in normally developing rats through adolescence into adulthood. Linear mixed-effects regression of homotopic RSFC revealed region-specific development trajectories. Nonlinear regression could predict individual brain maturity, and classification accurately distinguished adolescent from adult RSFC. Normal brain maturation profiles based on RSFC may thus provide valuable benchmarks for identifying and characterizing neurodevelopmental disturbances in rodent models of neuropsychiatric disease.

 

17:54           0139.Super-Resolution Track-Weighted Functional Connectivity (TW-FC): A Tool for Characterizing the Structural-Functional Connections in the Brain

Fernando Calamante1, 2, Richard Andrew James Masterton1, Jacques-Donald Tournier1, 2, Robert Elton Smith1, 2, Lisa Willats1, David Raffelt1, Alan Connelly1, 2

1Brain Research Institute, Florey Neuroscience Institutes, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia; 2Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

We apply the recently proposed super-resolution track-weighted imaging (TWI) methodology, to combine whole-brain fibre-tracking data (the so-called tractogram) with resting state functional connectivity (FC) data, to generate track-weighted (TW) FC maps of a given FC network. The method was assessed on data from 8 healthy volunteers. The TW-FC technique provides an approach for the fusion of structural and functional data into a single quantitative image. A potential important application of this methodology is for quantitative voxel-wise group comparison.

 

18:06           0140.Methodological Issues in Comparing Brain Connectivity Between Groups

John McGonigle1, 2, Majid Mirmehdi2, Laurence Reed1, Andrea Malizia3

1Neuropsychopharmacology Unit, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; 2Computer Science, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom; 3Psychopharmacology Unit, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom

When examining functional connectivity in the brain it is common to compare the synchrony of the mean time courses of spatially separated regions of interest and model these as edges between nodes in a graph. However, in creating a node, due to the commutative nature of the averaging, the quality of the time course can be driven by the number of voxels in the region in the native space of the subject. We explore this issue using real and simulated data and find that differences in apparent connectivity between groups with systematically different structure and volume may be artefactual.

 

18:18           0141.Assessing High Frequency Functional Connectivity Networks

MAGNA25Thomas Allan1, Cesar Caballero-Gaudes2, Matthew Brookes1, Susan Francis1, Penny Gowland1

1SPMMRC, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, United Kingdom; 2Department of Radiology and Medical Informatics, Hopitaux Universitaire de Genève, Genève, Switzerland

We investigate the signal fluctuations behind functional connectivity to determine what contribution high frequency signals (greater than 0.01Hz) and haemodynamic events have on functional correlations. We also consider how the number of events found during rest periods, using paradigm free mapping, changes following a task (motor and 2-back task) and how these events modulate functional networks. We show that events and high frequency oscillations are a significant contributor to network connectivity, and removing these events changes the correlation between distinct brain regions.

 

Applications of New Hardware Systems

Room 210-211 16:30-18:30            Moderators: Christoph Barmet & Paul R. Harvey

16:30           0142.Measurement and Pre-Emphasis of Shim Responses Using Frequency Sweeps

SUMMA25Signe Johanna Vannesjo1, Benjamin Dietrich1, Christoph Barmet1, Bertram J. Wilm1, David O. Brunner1, Klaas P. Pruessmann1

1Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University and ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland

Dynamic use of higher-order shims to improve static B0, puts increasing demands on characterization of shim field dynamics and requires pre-emphasis implementations to counteract eddy current effects. Measurements of the shim impulse response function (SIRF), using a dynamic field camera, and rectangular test functions, have previously been shown to provide detailed information on shim responses. Here, frequency-sweeped test pulses are implemented for wide bandwidth coverage and increased sensitivity of the SIRF measurements. It is shown that SIRFs thus measured could form a basis for digital pre-emphasis, enabling a flat frequency response and fast shim settling after a switching event.

 

16:42           0143.Real-Time Shim Compensation in the Human Breast

SUMMA25Vincent Oltman Boer1, Mariska P. Luttje1, Alex A. Bhogal1, Giel Mens2, Hans Hoogduin1, Peter R. Luijten1, Dennis W.J. Klomp1

1Radiology, UMC Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands; 2Philips Medical Solutions, Best, Netherlands

Real-time control of the shim fields will allow for compensation of B0 field variations in the human body caused by breathing, cardiac pulsation, non-voluntarily motion, scanner drift etc. In this work the feasibility of real-time measurement and updating of the shim fields is examined and applied to real-time measurement and correction of the B0 field in the human breast at 7T.

 

16:54           0144.Measurement of Microscopic Head Motion During Brain Imaging

Julian Maclaren1, Brian S. Armstrong2, Robb T. Barrows2, K. A. Danishad3, Thomas Ernst4, Colin L. Foster2, Kazim Gumus4, Michael Herbst1, Ilja Y. Kadashevich3, Todd P. Kusik2, Qiaotian Li2, Cris Lovell-Smith1, Tom Prieto5, Peter Schulze3, Oliver Speck3, Daniel Stucht3, Maxim Zaitsev1

1Dept. of Radiology, University Medical Center, Freiburg, Germany; 2Electrical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; 3Biomedical Magnetic Resonance, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg; 4Dept. of Medicine, University of Hawaii; 5Dept. of Neurology, Medical College of Wisconsin

This work describes the design, construction and testing of an MR-compatible in-bore camera capable of measuring head motion with a precision of around 10 micrometres. The system is used to quantify cardiac and breathing-related head motion in normal subjects during simultaneous MR imaging.

 

17:06           0145.Reference Layer Artefact Subtraction (RLAS): A Novel Method of Minimizing EEG Artefacts During Simultaneous fMRI.

SUMMA25Muhammad E.H. Chowdhury1, Karen J. Mullinger1, Richard W. Bowtell1

1SPMMRC, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, United Kingdom

Large artefacts due to switched gradients, cardiac pulsation and head movement compromise EEG data quality during simultaneous EEG-fMRI. Artefacts are often corrected using average artefact subtraction (AAS), but small movements significantly hinder the performance of AAS. Here we attenuate the artefacts by subtracting the signal from a reference layer, which has a similar conductivity to tissue and carries a set of electrodes and leads that precisely overlay those attached to the scalp. In experiments on a phantom and human subject undergoing small movements, we demonstrate that Reference Layer Artefact Subtraction (RLAS) outperforms AAS in reduction of gradient and movement artefacts.

 

17:18           0146.Discrete RF Coil Components Introduce Significant Noise and Artifacts Into PET Images in Combined PET-MRI Systems

MAGNA25Geron A. Bindseil1, William B. Handler1, Blaine A. Chronik1, 2

1Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada; 2Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada

In simultaneous PET-MRI, the RF coil is located within the PET ring. Many RF coils consist of a symmetrical arrangement of discrete highly attenuating components: solder and capacitors. The authors investigated the effect of a birdcage RF coil on PET image artifacts and noise through a comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation utilizing the commercial reconstruction software of the small-animal system modeled. Attenuation-corrected PET images from simulations with and without an RF coil were compared. The RF coil case had 40% higher scatter fraction, 25% higher noise and artifacts. RF coils having discrete components in the PET FOV should be designed carefully.

 

17:30           0147.MR-Based Compensation of Respiratory Motion Artifacts of In-Vivo PET Images Acquired on a Simultaneous Whole-Body MR/PET System

Christian Würslin1, Holger Schmidt1, 2, Petros Martirosian1, Lars Stegger3, Nina Schwenzer1

1Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Tübingen, D-72076 Tübingen, Germany; 2Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, University Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany; 3Clinic und Polyclinic of Nuklear Medicine, University Hospital Münster, Münster, Germany

To compensate for respiratory motion artefacts in PET images while maintaining full SNR using simultaneously acquired MR images.

 

17:42           0148.Integrated 7T MRI & SPECT Systems for Small-Animal Imaging

Mark Jason Hamamura1, Seunghoon Ha1, Werner W. Roeck1, James Hugg2, Dirk Meier3, Bradley E. Patt2, Orhan Nalcioglu1, 4

1Tu & Yuen Center for Functional Onco-Imaging, University of California, Irvine, CA, United States; 2Gamma Medica, Inc., Northridge, CA, United States; 3Gamma Medica, Inc., Fornebu, Norway; 4Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Pusan, Korea, Republic of

The integration of small-bore MRI and SPECT systems for back-to-back multimodality imaging has previously been limited to magnetic field strengths of only 0.1 T. Through the use of CZT-based nuclear radiation detectors, we have integrated SPECT with a 7 T MRI system for small-animal imaging. Co-registered MR and SPECT images of a mouse injected with 99mTc were acquired using this combined system.

 

17:54           0149.Hybrid Magnetic Resonance & Ultrasound (MR-US) Imaging as a Novel Method of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment Guidance and Monitoring

MAGNA25Victoria Bull1, John Civale1, Ian Rivens1, David J. Collins2, Gail ter Haar1, Martin O. Leach2

1Department of Radiotherapy and Imaging, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey, United Kingdom; 2CR-UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey, United Kingdom

Although MRI is considered the gold standard for HIFU treatment guidance, it lacks the ability to interrogate blood flow and monitor cavitation during treatments. A hybrid MR-ultrasound (MR-US) imaging system has shown promise as an improved technique, allowing real-time Doppler ultrasound and B-mode cavitation detection to be performed simultaneously with MR thermometry. A comparative study of truly simultaneous MR-US thermometry has also been conducted, showing good correlation between measurements of temperature change. The appearance of cavitation correlated with fluctuations in MR thermometry, and colour Doppler added dynamic information to MR angiographs. This system is a strong candidate for clinical use.

 

18:06           0150.MRI with Sideband Excitation: Application to Continuous SWIFT

SUMMA25David O. Brunner1, Benjamin E. Dietrich1, Matteo Pavan1, Klaas P. Pruessmann1

1Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University and ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland

Concurrent RF transmission and reception would be beneficial for many applications in NMR such as imaging of short T2-samples. Since the isolation achieved by decoupling of transmit and receive paths is typically not sufficient neither robust, the sideband excitation approach is applied to isolate the excitation pulse from the retrieved data. In conjunction with a custom excitation chain and spectrometer, images have been acquired using the SWIFT sequence with continuous excitation and reception. RF transmitter infidelities are captured by a real-time monitoring of the RF chain allowing reconstructing the data on the excitation pulse as measured in the coil.

 

18:18           0151.Bloch Simulation of Human MR Imaging at 14T

MAGNA25Zhipeng Cao1, Giuseppe Carluccio2, Joshua Park3, Sukhoon Oh4, Zhang-Hee Cho3, Christopher M. Collins4

1Bioengineering, Penn State University, Hershey, PA, United States; 2Electrical Engineering, The University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States; 3Neuroscience Research Institute, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Incheon, Korea, Republic of; 4Radiology, Penn State University, Hershey, PA, United States

The feasibility of human head imaging at 14T is explored using a Bloch-based MRI simulator that considers realistic B0, B1, and E1 distributions, including multiple transmit and receive channels. Field inhomogeneity, image SNR and SAR in the human head with and without RF shimming are examined at 3T, 7T, and 14T. The results showed a dramatic increase of image SNR from 3T to 14T, with a more subtle SAR increase, especially from 7T to 14T

 

Myocardial Perfusion

Room 212-213 16:30-18:30            Moderators: Rohan Dharmakumar & Krishna S. Nayak

16:30           0152.Accuracy of CMR Arterial Spin Labeling Method for Detecting Myocardial Ischemia: In Comparison with PET

Jie Zheng1, David Muccigrosso1, Robert J. Gropler1

1Washington University, Saint Louis, MO, United States

The accuracy of a CMR ASL method was evaluated in a canine model of myocardial ischemia, in comparison with PET in the same subject. There is very strong agreement in myocardial blood flow between CMR ASL and PET, despite that resting blood flow was underestimated by CMR ASL. Myocardial flow reserve was comparable between two imaging modalities.

 

16:42           0153.Detecting ACS & Identifying Acute Ischemic Territories with Cardiac Phase-Resolved BOLD MRI at Rest

MAGNA25Sotirios Tsaftaris1, 2, Xiangzhi Zhou2, Richard Tang3, James Min3, Debiao Li, 23, Rohan Dharmakumar, 23

1IMT - Institutions Markets Technologies, Lucca, LU, Italy; 2Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, United States; 3Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, United States

Noninvasive imaging approaches that can rapidly assess an ongoing ischemia can be of great value in detecting and triaging patients experiencing acute coronary syndromes (ACS), particularly in cases of non ST elevation myocardial infarction. We rely on detecting systolic and diastolic SSFP signal changes related to perturbation in cardiac phase-dependent blood volume and oxygenation associated with severe coronary narrowing on the basis of cardiac phase-resolved Blood-Oxygen-Level-Dependent imaging. We show (in canines) that we can assess functional/volumetric status and non-invasively identify ischemic territories under resting conditions in a single scan without any exogenous contrast media.

 

16:54           0154.CAIPIRINHA Accelerated Myocardial First-Pass Perfusion Imaging with High Resolution and Extended Coverage – a Patient Study

MAGNA25Daniel Stäb1, Felix A. Breuer2, Christian Oliver Ritter1, Dietbert Hahn1, Herbert Köstler1

1Institute of Radiology, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany; 2Research Center Magnetic Resonance Bavaria, Würzburg, Germany

Applying CAIPIRINHA with an acceleration factor higher than the number of simultaneously acquired slices allows accelerating the imaging procedure in slice and phase encoding direction. The concept facilitates myocardial first-pass perfusion imaging with high spatial resolution and extended anatomic coverage of 6 to 8 slices every heart beat. In-vivo volunteer and patient studies are presented showing excellent image quality at a high spatial resolution of 2.0 x 2.0 mm2. Being easy to implement and providing short reconstruction times, the technique is suitable for application in clinical routine.

 

17:06           0155.Three-Dimensional K-T PCA Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Perfusion Imaging for Quantification of Myocardial Ischemic Burden in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

MAGNA25Robert Manka1, 2, Ingo Paetsch3, Cosima Jahnke3, Sebastian Kozerke1

1Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University and ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 2Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 3Department of Cardiology,, University Hospital RWTH Aachen

Three-Dimensional Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Perfusion Imaging offers high diagnostic performance with accurate and reliable assessment of myocardial ischemic burden in patients with coronary artery disease as defined by fractional flow reserve measurements during invasive coronary angiography.

 

17:18           0156.Three-Dimensional First-Pass Cardiac Perfusion MRI Using a Stack-Of-Spirals Aquisition

SUMMA25Taehoon Shin1, Krishna S. Nayak2, Juan M. Santos3, Dwight G. Nishimura1, Bob S. Hu, 34, Michael V. McConnell5

1Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States; 2Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States; 3Heart Vista Inc., Palo Alto, CA, United States; 4Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Palo Alto, CA, United States; 5Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States

Three-dimensional first-pass myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) has shown great promise for precise sizing of defects and for providing high perfusion contrast. It remains an experimental approach primarily due to poor spatial resolution and issues with motion. We have developed a rapid 3D MPI method using a stack-of-spirals acquisition accelerated by k-t SENSE, which allows whole-heart coverage with 2.4x2.4x9 mm3 spatial resolution. This approach correlates well with standard 2DFT method in terms of overall temporal dynamics and upslope of time intensity curves.

 

17:30           0157.Comparison of Quantitative Myocardial Perfusion from Self-Gated and Gated Acquisitions

Edward DiBella1, Srikant K. Iyer1, Ganesh Adluru1, Brian Martin1, Devavrat Likhite1, Chris J. McGann2, Alexis Harrison2

1UCAIR/Radiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, United States; 2Cardiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, United States

Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI for characterizing perfusion in the myocardium is becoming a more robust and useful clinical tool. Methods for ungated acquisitions and retrospective self-gating were recently introduced. Such ungated imaging could be valuable whenever ECG-gating is poor, and in particular in patients with arrhythmias. Here we compare a self-gated perfusion acquisition directly to a gated acquisition in subjects in sinus rhythm, to determine how well quantitative perfusion values in ml/min/g can be obtained with the self-gated approach.

 

17:42           0158.Reperfusion Intramyocardial Hemorrhage Following Acute Myocardial Infarction: Assessment Using Magnetic Resonance Susceptibility Weighted High-Pass Filtered (HPF) Phase Imaging

James Goldfarb1, 2, Usama Hasan1, 3, Wenguo Zhao1, Jing Han1

1Research and Education, St Francis Hospital, Roslyn, NY, United States; 2Biomedical Engineering, SUNY Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY, United States; 3New York College of Ostopathic Medicine,, Old Westbury, NY, United States

The major aim of this study was to quantitatively investigate LV myocardial HPF-phase in gradient echo images in normal subjects to determine normal ranges as a function of TE and anatomical position and then compare HPF-phase values in patients with myocardial infarction of varying ages with normal ranges. Myocardial high pass filtered myocardial phase is small and normally varies by anatomical myocardial segment. Myocardial hemorrhage causes a significant phase decrease beyond these normal variations. HPF-phase images represent a quantitative, high quality method for the detection of myocardial hemorrhage without the need for the presence or high quality visualization of myocardial edema.

 

17:54           0159.Automated Area at Risk Detection Using Myocardial T1 Maps Acquired Pre- And Post Contrast Agent Administration

Tobias Voigt1, Zhong Chen2, Christian Buerger, 23, Valentina Puntmann2, Reza Razavi2, Tobias Schaeffter2, Andrea J. Wiethoff, 24

1Philips Research, London, United Kingdom; 2King's College London, London, United Kingdom; 3Philips Research, Hamburg, Germany; 4Philips Healthcare, Guildford, United Kingdom

This study presents a new method for automated segmentation of blood pool, infarct area, healthy myocardium and grey zone. A clustering algorithm was implemented based on two quantitative T1 maps acquired before and after contrast agent administration. First in vivo results obtained in patients with known ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) are shown and compared to late enhancement images where good agreement was observed.

 

18:06           0160.Simultaneous Acquisition of Quantitative ASL & T2* (SQUAB) for Characterization of Skeletal Muscle Hemodynamics.

Ronn P. Walvick1, Ruth P. Lim1, Vivian S. Lee2

1Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, United States; 2The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, United States

BOLD and perfusion change rapidly in skeletal muscle following exercise. In this work, we propose a sequence that allows for simultaneous quantification of T2* and ASL using a sequence featuring dual-echo EPI readouts, and saturation prepared FAIR prepulses for blood labeling. This sequence was tested in a cohort of volunteers and a patient with peripheral arterial disease. We show considerable increases in T2*and blood flow from baseline following exercise in volunteers and a blunted, delayed patient response. Our results show the feasibility of quickly acquiring simultaneous blood flow and T2* data and demonstrate sensitivity to disease

 

18:18           0161.Influence of Nitroglycerin for Combined Coronary Lumen & Vessel Wall Magnetic Resonance Imaging

MAGNA25Tarique Hussain1, Markus Henningsson1, Britta Butzbach1, Marcelo Andia1, Rene Botnar1

1King's College London, London, England, United Kingdom

 

Cancer - Animal Models & Physiology

Room 219-220 16:30-18:30            Moderators: Harish Poptani & Simon P. Robinson

16:30           0162.Imaging the Relationship between Tumour Interstitial Fluid Velocity & Microvascular Perfusion with ConvectionMRI

SUMMA25Simon Walker-Samuel1, Jake Burrell2, Rajiv Ramasawmy1, Peter Johnson3, Jack Wells1, Bernard Siow1, Simon P. Robinson2, Barbara Pedley3, Mark F. Lythgoe1

1Centre for Advanced Biomedical Imaging, University College London, London, United Kingdom; 2CR-UK & EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, The Institute of Cancer Research, United Kingdom; 3Cancer Institute, University College London, United Kingdom

High tumour interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) is hypothesised to be caused by raised vascular permeability and thus driven by microvascular pressure. We have developed a novel method for measuring tumour interstitial fluid velocity (IFV) named convectionMRI that can map the path of fluid transport through the tumour interstitium. By combining this technique with arterial spin labelling to evaluate vascular perfusion, we have shown a correspondence between IFV spatial distribution, vascular perfusion and spatial pressure gradients that are consistent with this microvascular pressure hypothesis. We discuss the potential for the non-invasive assessment of barriers to drug delivery.

 

16:42           0163.Mapping the Systemic Recruitment of Ferritin Expressing Fibroblasts to the Angiogenic Rim of Ovarian Tumors

SUMMA25Moriel Vandsburger1, Batya Cohen1, Yoseph Addadi1, Marina Radoul1, Michal Neeman1

1Biological Regulation, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel

Recruitment of fibroblasts by solid tumors plays a critical role in initiation, progression and metastatic dissemination. As such, cancer associated fibroblasts are attractive as potential avenues for novel anti-cancer therapies. MRI of fibroblast recruitment could enable assessment of drug efficacy on the cellular level, but is hindered by limitations of cell labeling techniques. We examined the potential of ferritin over-expression for quantitative MRI tracking of fibroblasts recruitment to human ovarian carcinoma both In Vitro, and in vivo. Our results indicate even under conditions of sparse populations of tagged cells, over-expression of ferritin can be used for quantitative cell tracking.

 

16:54           0164.Tumor Location Is a Major Determinant of Macromolecular Transport, Collagen Fiber Morphology & Metastasis

Marie-France Penet1, Samata Kakkad1, Arvind P. Pathak1, Venu Raman1, Meiyappan Solaiyappan1, Zaver M. Bhujwalla1

1JHU ICMIC Program, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States

Prostate cancers growing orthotopically in the prostate result in metastasis to lymph nodes, lungs and liver, and malignant ascites. In contrast, identical xenografts growing heterotopically in the flank rarely result in metastasis. Here we used noninvasive MRI and optical microscopy to characterize interstitial fluid transport and the extracellular matrix in metastasis-permissive or preventive environments using human prostate cancer cells engineered to fluoresce under hypoxia. We observed significant differences in macromolecular transport and collagen I fiber morphology between tumors implanted orthotopically and subcutaneously. These insights may lead to strategies to prevent prostate cancer metastasis.

 

17:06           0165.Investigating Tumour Vascular Connectivity with Resting State MRI & Independent Component Analysis

SUMMA25Miguel R. Gonçalves1, 2, Simon Walker-Samuel1, Sean P. Johnson2, Rosamund B. Pedley2, Mark F. Lythgoe1

1UCL Centre for Advanced Biomedical Imaging, Division of Medicine and Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom; 2UCL Cancer Institute, London, United Kingdom

Solid tumours were found to exhibit oscillating patterns of hypoxia and reoxygenation due to microregional instabilities in blood flow and oxygen delivery. This phenomenon has been linked to a chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistance, and a correlation has been found between these fluctuating regions and measurements of tumour vascular functionality. Independent Component Analysis (ICA) is a computational technique previously used in the brain to identify patterns of activation during resting state. Given the similarity between oscillations in oxygenation in tumours and brain we investigated the utility of ICA to study and characterise these cyclical events in tumours.

 

17:18           0166.Assessing Breast Cancer Angiogenesis in vivo: Which MRI Biomarkers Are Relevant?

SUMMA25Eugene Kim1, Jana Cebulla2, B. Douglas Ward3, Kevin Rhie2, Jiangyang Zhang2, Arvind P. Pathak2, 4

1The Whitaker Biomedical Engineering Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States; 2The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University; 3Department of Biophysics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, United States; 4The Johns Hopkins University in vivo Cellular and Molecular Imaging Center Program

There is a crucial need for noninvasive biomarkers of breast cancer angiogenesis to evaluate the efficacy of new anti-angiogenic therapies in vivo. Here, we validated in vivo steady-state susceptibility contrast (SSC)-MRI biomarkers of angiogenesis in an orthotopic human breast cancer model against the 3D vascular morphology obtained from high-resolution micro-computed tomography (µCT). Based on cross-validation analysis, the simple parameters that only require &#916;R2 and &#916;R2* measurements were better predictors of their µCT analogs than were the complex parameters that require additional measurements. Thus, a stand-alone SSC-MRI experiment provides promising candidates for noninvasive, in vivo biomarkers of breast cancer angiogenesis.

 

17:30           0167.Mapping in vivo Tumor Oxygenation Within Viable Tumor Using 19F MRI & Multispectral Analysis

Yunzhou Shi1, David Finkle2, Franklin Peale3, Jed Ross1, Maj Hedehus1, Nicholas Van Bruggen1, Suzanna Clark2, Rayna Venook2, Sarajane Ross2, Richard Carano1

1Biomedical Imaging, Genentech Inc.(Roche group), South San Francisco, CA, United States; 2Translational Oncology, Genentech Inc.(Roche group), South San Francisco, CA, United States; 3Pathology, Genentech Inc.(Roche group), South San Francisco, CA, United States

A novel approach that combines 19F MRI oximetry with diffusion-based multispectral analysis was developed. The current study demonstrates that pO2 measurements can be restricted to the viable tumor and that the necrotic tissue classes contribute erroneous data to whole-tumor estimates of the pO2 response during a breathing gas challenge experiment on mice. This novel approach provides a means to measure pO2 within tissue of therapeutic interest and address the issue of tumor heterogeneity that complicates pO2 tumor imaging.

 

17:42           0168.MRI Describes Mitigation of Radiation Necrosis

MAGNA25Xiaoyu Jiang1, John A. Engelbach2, Jeremy Cates3, Dinesh K. Thotala3, Robert E. Drzymala3, Dennis E. Hallahan3, Joseph JH Ackerman2, Joel R. Garbow2

1Chemistry, Washington University in St. louis, St. louis, MO, United States; 2Radiology, Washington University in St. louis, St. louis, MO, United States; 3Radiation Oncology, Washington University in St. louis, St. louis, MO, United States

Radiation necrosis is a severe, but late occurring, injury to normal tissue, within and surrounding a radiation treatment field. Increases in vascular permeability (“leakiness”) and acute vascular apoptosis have both been suggested as possible causes of radiation necrosis. Bevacizumab may help to repair “leaky” capillaries and thereby mitigate radiation necrosis. Specific inhibitors of GSK-3β, a serine/threonine kinase, are known to ameliorate apoptosis. We have recently developed a novel mouse model of radiation necrosis using Gamma Knife irradiation. Here, we use small-animal MRI to measure the mitigation of radiation necrosis by bevacizumab and SB415286, an inhibitor of GSK-3β, in this mouse model.

 

17:54           0169.MRI Characterization of a Novel Mouse Model of Sporadic Medulloblastoma

SUMMA25Giselle Alexandra Suero-Abreu1, 2, G. Praveen Raju3, Diane Pham3, Luis Barraza4, Kamila U. Szulc1, 2, Edward J. Houston2, Alexandra Joyner4, Daniel H. Turnbull, 12

1Biomedical Imaging Department, NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY, United States; 2Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine, NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY, United States; 3Department of Pediatrics, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, United States; 4Developmental Biology Program, Memorial Sloan Kettering Institute, New York, NY, United States

Preclinical brain tumors models have the ability to provide insights on the etiology and pathogenesis of the human disease. Since studies performed in end-stage tumors may not accurately reflect their critical genetic alterations, there is a need for sensitive imaging methods in order to analyze the early stages of tumorigenesis. In our study, we optimized an in vivo high resolution MEMRI protocol for the characterization of tumor progression in a novel mouse model of sporadic Medulloblastoma. We successfully detected early pre-neoplastic lesions, longitudinally assessed their progression and analyzed the molecular and imaging features of advanced-stage tumors.

 

18:06           0170.Biphasic Clearance of Depot Vaccine Antigen & Substrate Visualized Using SPIO MRI

MAGNA25Kim Brewer1, 2, Kerry Lake3, Nicole Pelot3, 4, Drew DeBay3, Andrea Penwell1, Genevieve Weir1, Marc Mansour1, Chris Bowen, 23

1Immunovaccine Inc., Halifax, NS, Canada; 2School of Biomedical Engineering, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada; 3Institute for Biodiagnostics (Atlantic), National Research Council of Canada, Halifax, NS, Canada; 4Electrical Engineering, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada

DepoVaxTM is a liposome-in-oil-based vaccine platform that uses tumor-associated antigens (TAA) encapsulated in liposomes and suspended in oil. The oil acts as an adjuvant that increases the potency of the vaccine. By attaching superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) to the TAA and then encapsulating in liposomes, one can visualize the longitudinal biodistribution of the TAA and evaluate whether the TAA slowly clears from the depot site, resulting in a potentiated immune response. To evaluate the longitudinal clearance of the DepoVaxTM vaccine components, mice underwent a C3 (HPV16 model) challenge using SPIO conjugated to the TAA or associated with the lipid.

 

18:18           0171.Osteopontin Is Associated with Tumor Malignancy Revealed by Multi-Parametric MRI Assays

MAGNA25Nai-Wei Yao1, 2, Chiao-Chi V. Chen1, Yi-Hua Hsu1, Hsiu-Ting Lin1, Jeou-Yuan Chen1, Chen Chang1

1Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academic Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Department of Zoology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan

Gliomas are aggressive brain tumors with a poor prognosis and remain refractory to treatment. Osteopontin (OPN) is strongly expressed in high-grade and metastatic brain tumors and plays a major role in cancer progression. It is hypothesized in this study that OPN is associated with tumor malignancy. OPN knockdown of rat C6 glioblastoma cells was used as a tactic to investigate the roles of OPN in tumor malignancy. The present study demonstrates that the tumor with OPN-knockdown exhibited lower malignancy than control tumors, including decreased T2 signal intensity of tumor, lower vascular permeability, and the changes of tumor-related metabolites.

 

Special Session

Meet the Editors & AMPC

Organizers: Roland Bammer, Ph.D., Matt A. Bernstein, Ph.D., Garry E. Gold, M.D., C. Leon Partain, M.D., Ph.D. & James G. Pipe, Ph.D.

Room 105-106 16:30-18:30           

Meet the ISMRM Journal Editors:

Overview, Touch on Pitfalls, Do's & Don'ts & Some Publication Ethics Issues

16:30           . JMRI

C. Leon Partain, M.D., Ph.D.

 

16:45           . MRM

Matt A. Bernstein, Ph.D.

 

17:00           . Outreach Perspectives for Authors & Reviewers in Rapidly Developing Nations Like China

TBD

 

17:15           . What Do I Need To Do To Get My Paper Accepted?

Matt A. Bernstein, Ph.D. & C. Leon Partain, M.D., Ph.D.

 

Meet the ISMRM AMPC:

From Your Abstract Submission to Your Podium (Poster) Presentation

17:30           . The AMPC: What It Does & Who Is On It

Garry E. Gold, M.D.

 

17:40           . The ISMRM Annual Meeting Abstract Review Process

Garry E. Gold, M.D.

 

17:50           . Creating a Meeting Program at the AMPC

James G. Pipe, Ph.D.

 

18:00           . What Do I Need To Do To Get My Abstract Accepted?

James G. Pipe, Ph.D.

 

Moderator: Roland Bammer, Ph.D.

18:10 Open Discussion (Journals & AMPC)

 

18:30           . Adjournment

 

 

Clinical Intensive Course

MR Physics & Techniques for Clinicians

Organizers: Marcus T. Alley, Ph.D. & Michael Markl, Ph.D.

Room 202 16:30-18:30            Moderators: Marcus T. Alley, Ph.D. & Michael Markl, Ph.D.

16:30           . Spin Gymnastics 1

Walter Kucharczyk, M.D., F.R.C.P.C.

 

17:10           . Spin Gymnastics 2

Donald B. Plewes, Ph.D.

 

17:50           . K-Space

Kevin M. Koch, Ph.D.

 

18:30           . Adjournment

 

Korean Meeting

Room 212-213 18:45-19:30           

 

Sunrise Educational Course - Clinical Intensive Course

Hot Topics in Body MRI

Organizers: Shahid M. Hussain, M.D., Caroline Reinhold, M.D. & Evis Sala, M.D., Ph.D., F.R.C.R.

Room 201 07:00-08:00            Moderators: Masoom Haider, M.D. & Shahid Hussain, M.D.

Diffusion Imaging: Body Applications

07:00           . Diffusion Imaging: Technical Considerations

Taro Takahara, M.D., Ph.D.

 

07:20           . Liver Lesions: Added Value of Diffusion MRI

Dow-Mu Koh, M.D., M.R.C.P., F.R.C.R.

 

07:40           . Renal Lesions: Added Value of Diffusion MRI

Harriet C. Thoeny, M.D.

 

08:00           . Adjournment

 

Sunrise Educational Course

MR Spectroscopy & Spectroscopic Imaging

Organizers: Daniel M. Spielman, Ph.D. & Ivan Tkac, Ph.D.

Room 202 07:00-08:00            Moderators: Daniel M. Spielman, Ph.D. & Ivan Tkac, Ph.D.

07:00           . Methodology of MRSI

Hoby P. Hetherington, Ph.D.

 

07:30           . Fast MRSI

Stefan Posse, Ph.D.

 

08:00           . Adjournment

 

Sunrise Educational Course

Whole Body MRI

Organizers: Roland Bammer, Ph.D. & Harald Kramer, M.D.

Room 105-106 07:00-08:00            Moderators: Roland Bammer, Ph.D. & Harald Kramer, M.D.

Technical Background: How to Get Started

07:00           . Hardware Requirements for Whole Body MRI

Gerhard Laub, Ph.D.

 

07:30           . Acquisition Strategies for Whole Body MRI / MRA

Stephen J. Riederer, Ph.D.

 

08:00           . Adjournment

 

Sunrise Educational Course

Computer-Aided Diagnosis: Managing the Information Explosion

Organizer: Pratik Mukherjee, M.D., Ph.D.

Room 109-110 07:00-08:00            Moderators: Joseph A. Maldjian, M.D. & Pratik Mukherjee, M.D., Ph.D.

07:00           . Data-Driven Feature Extraction from Complex MRI Datasets: PCA, ICA, Etc.

Stephen M. Smith, D.Phil.

 

07:30           . Machine Learning Classification & Regression

Edward H. Herskovits, M.D., Ph.D.

 

08:00           . Adjournment

 

Sunrise Educational Course

Cutting-Edge Cardiovascular MR: From Small Animal Models to State-of-the-Art Imaging in Patients

Organizers: Tim Leiner, M.D., Ph.D., Thoralf Niendorf, Ph.D., David E. Sosnovik, M.D. & Matthias Stuber, Ph.D.

Room 210-211 07:00-08:00            Moderators: David E. Sosnovik, M.D. & Gustav J. Strijkers, Ph.D.

Options for CMR in Small Animals

07:00           . Cardiac MRI in Small Rodents

Andreas Pohlmann, Ph.D.

 

07:20           . Dedicated Small Animal Scanner: The Cutting-Edge

Gustav J. Strijkers, Ph.D.

 

07:40           . Use of a Clinical Scanner: What's Possible

Lindsey A. Crowe, Ph.D.

 

08:00           . Adjournment

 

Sunrise Educational Course

Absolute Beginner's Guide to Neuroimaging Methods

Organizers: Xiaoping P. Hu, Ph.D., Kamil Uludag, Ph.D. & Matthias J. P. van Osch, Ph.D.

Room 212-213 07:00-08:00            Moderator: Claudia A. Wheeler-Kingshott, Ph.D.

07:00           . Diffusion Basics

Alexander Leemans, Ph.D.

 

07:30           . Diffusion Analysis

Bram Stieltjes, M.D.

 

08:00           . Adjournment

 

Sunrise Educational Course - Clinical Intensive Course

Advanced MRI Techniques with MSK Applications

Organizers: Christine Chung, M.D., Bernard J. Dardzinski, Ph.D., Garry E. Gold, M.D. & Hollis G. Potter, M.D.

Room 203-204 07:00-08:00            Moderators: Bernard J. Dardzinski, Ph.D. & Garry E. Gold, M.D.

Diffusion Imaging: MSK Applications

07:00           . DWI/DTI: Muscle

Bruce M. Damon, Ph.D.

 

07:30           . DWI/DTI: Cartilage

Brian A. Hargreaves, Ph.D.

 

08:00           . Adjournment

 

 

Sunrise Educational Course - Clinical Intensive Course

Absolute Beginner's Guide to Translational Neuroimaging

Organizers: Soonmee Cha, M.D., Marco Essig, M.D., Ph.D., Nadine J. Girard, M.D., Rakesh K. Gupta, M.D., Robia G. Pautler, Ph.D., Maria A. Rocca, M.D. & Stefan Sunaert, M.D., Ph.D.

Plenary Hall 07:00-08:00            Moderator: Maria A. Rocca, M.D.

Anatomy

07:00           . In Vivo MRI of Mouse Brain Development: From Embryo to Adult

Daniel H. Turnbull, Ph.D.

 

07:30           . A Window into the Brain: MRI Anatomy from Development through Aging

Mirjana Maletic-Savitch, M.D., Ph.D.

 

08:00           . Adjournment

 

Sunrise Educational Course

Image Reconstruction

Organizers: Fa-Hsuan Lin, Ph.D. & Craig H. Meyer, Ph.D.

Room 219-220 07:00-08:00            Moderators: Fa-Hsuan Lin, Ph.D. & Craig H. Meyer, Ph.D.

Fast Non-Cartesian & Iterative Image Reconstruction

07:00           . Gridding & the NUFFT for Non-Cartesian Image Reconstruction

John M. Pauly, Ph.D.

 

07:30           . Fast Implementation of Iterative Image Reconstruction

Tobias R. Schaeffter, Ph.D.

 

08:00           . Adjournment

 

 

Plenary Session:

Redefining Psychiatry Through Advances in MR

Organizers: Xiaoping P. Hu, Ph.D. & Stefan Sunaert, M.D., Ph.D.

Plenary Hall 08:15-09:30           

08:15           0172.Overview of Psychiatric Disease

Kelvin O. Lim1

1University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States

Psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety and schizophrenia result in substantial morbidity and mortality as well as financial costs to society. Available treatments are of limited efficacy.

Despite major advances in the neurosciences and genetics,  the etiology of these disorders are still unknown.  This has hampered the development of diagnostic tests and better treatments. Stigma affects the ability of affected individuals to seek and receive available treatment.  Limitations of animal models point to the importance of studying the actual disorders in humans. Magnetic resonance has an important role to play in elucidating the pathophysiology of these disorders.

 

 

08:40           0173.Current State-Of-The-Art MRI

Steven C. R. Williams1

1King's College London, London, England

This talk will cover the latest MRI developments in the field of psychiatry. A range of examples where structural and functional MR imaging is playing an increasing role in the assessment of autism, depression, Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia will be reviewed and the potential for automated disease classification and prediction of response to treatment will be highlighted. Integration of such imaging data with other clinical and biological information will undoubtedly increase our neurobiological understanding of these conditions which will lead to better patient management, more personalized interventions and less stigma surrounding these very common disorders.

 

 

09:05           0174.Treatment, Neuromodulation

Helen S. Mayberg1

1Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States

Critical to the refinement of subcallosal cingulate DBS as a therapeutic strategy for patients with intractable depression will be the full characterization of brain systems mediating abnormal mood states as well as those mediating successful and unsuccessful response. Functional neuroimaging first provided the critical foundation for target selection in initial pilot studies. Imaging has further played an important role in quantifying physiological effects of chronic stimulation, with emerging evidence of differential patterns in responders and non-responders. As clinical studies proceed, development of reliable biomarkers to improve patient recruitment, enhance surgical targeting and optimize parameter selection will be a necessary next step.

 

09:30           . Adjournment

 

 

Clinical Intensive Course

Oncologic Body Imaging

Organizers: Shahid M. Hussain, M.D., Caroline Reinhold, M.D. & Evis Sala, M.D., Ph.D., F.R.C.R.

Room 105-106 08:15-09:30            Moderators: Anwar R. Padhani, M.D., M.R.C.P., F.R.C.R. & Harriet C. Thoeny, M.D.

08:15           . Current Clinical Practice of Tumor Response Assessment

David M. Panicek, M.D.

 

08:40           . Tumor Response Assessment using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI

Mark A. Rosen, M.D., Ph.D.

 

09:05           . Tumor Response Assessment using Diffusion Weighted Imaging

Dow-Mu Koh, M.D., M.R.C.P., F.R.C.R.

 

09:30           . Adjournment

 

Clinical Intensive Course

MRI of the Hip

Organizers: Christine Chung, M.D. & Hollis G. Potter, M.D.

Room 202 08:15-09:30            Moderators: Suzanne E. Anderson-Sembach, M.D., Ph.D. & William B. Morrison, M.D.

08:15           . FAI & Other Abnormalities

Suzanne E. Anderson-Sembach, M.D., Ph.D.

 

08:40           . Soft Tissue Pathology: Gluteal/Hamstring/Sports Hernia/Ischiofem Impingement

Sandip Biswal, M.D.

 

09:05           . Osseous Lesions

William B. Morrison, M.D.

 

09:30 . Adjournment

 

Clinical Intensive Course

Hot Topics in Neuro-Therapy Part 1: Cochlear Implants

Organizers: Pia C. Maly Sundgren, M.D., Ph.D. & John D. Port, M.D., Ph.D.

Room 201 08:15-09:30            Ruth C. Carlos, M.D. & John D. Port, M.D., Ph.D.

08:15           . Should We Do It?

Leon Janse van Rensburg, M.D., D.Sc.

 

08:45           . How I Do It

Robert J. Witte, M.D.

 

09:15           . Panel Discussion & Meet the Teachers

 

09:30            Adjournment

 

 

Traditional Poster Session: Body; Molecular Imaging

Exhibition Hall 10:00:12:00           

 

Electronic Poster Session: Musculoskeletal

Exhibition Hall 10:00:12:00           

 

Study Group Session: White Matter; Susceptibility Weighted Imaging

Room 203-204 10:00-12:00           

 

Cancer - Cells, Animals & Metabolism

Plenary Hall 10:00-12:00            Moderators: E. Jim Delikatny & Arvind P. Pathak

10:00           0175.31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study on the Effects of Stably Silencing the Glycerophosphocholine Phosphodiesterase GDPD5 in a Breast Cancer Model in vivo

Jannie P. Wijnen1, 2, Lu Jiang1, Tiffany R. Greenwood1, Maria D. Cao3, Balaji Krishnamachary1, Dennis W.J. Klomp2, Kristine Glunde1

1Johns Hopkins University in vivo Cellular and Molecular Imaging Center,Russell H. Morgan Department, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States; 2Department of Radiology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands; 3Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trontheim, Norway

In the present study, we stably silenced glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase domain containing 5 (GDPD5) using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against GDPD5 and investigated the effects of this stable GDPD5 silencing in a breast tumour xenograft model with 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS). Stable silencing of the GDPD5 gene caused an increase in glycerophosphocholine (GPC) and a decrease in free choline in the tumour. This can be explained by the reduction GDPD5 expression in the GDPD5-silenced tumours, which leads to less degradation of GPC into free choline and glycerol-3-phosphate as GDPD5 confers GPC-PDE activity. We also observed an increase in phosphoethanolamine, which could be caused by phosphorylation of ethanolamine by choline and/or ethanolamine kinase as a compensatory mechanism to maintain high levels of phosphomonoesters in the cells.

 

10:12           0176.Treatment with the MEK Inhibitor U0126 Induces a Decrease in Hyperpolarized Pyruvate to Lactate Conversion in Breast But Not in Prostate Cancer Cells

SUMMA25Alessia Lodi1, Sarah M. Woods1, Sabrina M. Ronen1

1University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States

To date, response to anti-neoplastic treatment has been associated with a drop in 13C MRS-detectable hyperpolarized pyruvate to lactate conversion. Here we assessed the effect of treatment with the MEK inhibitor U0126 in prostate and breast cancer cells. Drug action resulted in a drop in the pyruvate to lactate conversion in breast cancer cells, but an increase in prostate cancer cells. This effect is likely mediated by an increase in intracellular lactate and LDH expression and activity in both cancer models and a concurrent drop in MCT1 expression in breast, but not in prostate cancer cells.

 

10:24           0177.Assessment of Glutamine Metabolism in Mammary Tumor Recurrence Using 13C MRS

MAGNA25Dania Daye1, 2, Suzanne Wehrli3, George Belka4, Anthony Mancuso5, Chris Sterner6, Mitchell Schnall5, Lewis Chodosh

1Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania , Philadelphia, PA, United States; 2Bioengineering Graduate Group, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States; 3Children's Hospital of Philadelphia; 4Department of Cancer Biology , Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania; 5Department of Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania; 6Department of Cancer Biology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Tumor recurrence represents the principal cause of death from breast cancer. Despite being a critical clinical problem, little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying tumor recurrence. Our laboratory has developed an inducible transgenic mouse model that accurately reproduces key features of the natural history of human breast cancer progression including tumor recurrence. Dysregulated metabolism has been shown to be key feature of tumorigenesis. To date, very little is know about the association between changes in metabolism and cancer recurrence. In this study, we investigate the role of 13C-glutamine as a potential breast cancer progression marker using MRS.

 

10:36           0178.Mining Lipid Signatures in a Breast Tumor Model by Combining Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging and Mass Spectrometric Imaging

SUMMA25Lu Jiang1, Kamila Chughtai2, Tiffany Greenwood1, Gert Eijkel2, Ron Heeren2, Kristine Glunde1

1JHU ICMIC Program, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins Medical Institute , Baltimore, MD, United States; 2FOM-Institute AMOLF, Netherlands

The intensity of the total choline (tCho) signal in magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) of tumors is spatially heterogeneous. in vivo H1 MRSI with the spectral resolution to resolve the components of the tCho signal and its membrane precursors is currently unavailable. Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of histologic tumor sections is able to detect thousands of molecules from the tissue surface. We have investigated the correlations between tCho, lipid metabolites, and membrane phospholipids in a human breast cancer model by combining in vivo MRSI with ex vivo MSI, which identified specific membrane phosphatidylcholine species that are decreased in high tCho regions.

 

10:48           0179.Molecular Correlates to in vivo Hyperpolarized [1-13C] Dehydroascorbate Reduction

Victor Sai1, Kayvan R. Keshari1, Romelyn Delos Santos1, John Kurhanewicz1, David M. Wilson1

1Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), San Francisco, CA, United States

In Vivo MRSI studies using HP [1-13C] dehydroascorbate (DHA) in a transgenic model of prostate cancer (TRAMP) show rapid uptake of DHA and reduction to Vitamin C. We hypothesized that this is secondary to increased uptake via GLUT-type transporters and elevated intracellular glutathione levels. Gene expression analysis demonstrated elevated GLUT3 but decreased GLUT1 expression. Thioredoxin reductase was also found to be elevated. Intracellular glutathione levels were increased in TRAMP tumor relative to normal prostate, and mercury orange staining for non-protein thiols was also increased in TRAMP tumor compared to normal control.

 

11:00           0180.Quantitative Biomarkers of Cancer from Metabolic Activity Decomposition Using Stimulated-Echoes and Hyperpolarized Carbon-13 MR

MAGNA25Christine M. Leon1, 2, Peder EZ Larson1, Adam B. Kerr3, Robert Bok1, John M. Pauly3, John Kurhanewicz1, Daniel B. Vigneron1

1Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States; 2UC Berkeley | UCSF Graduate Group in Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley and University of California, San Francisco , San Francisco, CA, United States; 3Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States

We propose a new and robust method for quantification of dynamic data. Using Metabolic Activity Decomposition, we investigated real-time conversion parameters as biomarkers of cancer. ex vivo enzyme experiments validated the technique, allowing for direct observation of real-time conversion, which can only be due to the LDH enzyme. Conventional modeling yields four unknowns but only two equations, an underdetermined system of equations. Using Metabolic Activity Decomposition, twice the amount of information can be obtained from a same acquisition providing a well-conditioned system. Moreover, fitting in vivo data with MAD-STEAM yielded KPyr→Lac values that robustly distinguished tumor versus normal (p-value=0.009)

 

11:12           0181.Imaging of Prostate Cancer Metabolic Heterogeneity with CEST & MT MRI

SUMMA25Kejia Cai1, He N. Xu, Anup Singh1, Mohammad Haris1, Ravinder Reddy1, Lin Z. Li

1CMROI, Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States

Here we report the preliminary data on chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) & magnetization transfer (MT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and redox scanning of two aggressive human prostate tumor lines (PC-3 and DU-145) xenografted in athymic nude mice. The results obtained by these methods appeared to be consistent with all showing higher level of heterogeneity in DU-145 tumors than in PC-3 tumors at this stage of tumor progression. MT and CEST MRI method could serve as a surrogate metabolic imaging biomarkers for redox imaging of tumor metastatic potential.

 

11:24           0182.Quantitative Imaging of Tumour Glucose Uptake Using GlucoseCEST: Comparison with 18F-FDG Autoradiography

MAGNA25Simon Walker-Samuel1, Rajiv Ramasawmy1, Francisco Torrealdea2, Marilena Rega2, Peter Johnson3, Vineeth Rajkumar3, Simon Richardson1, Dave Thomas2, Barbara Pedley3, Mark F. Lythgoe1, Xavier Golay2

1Centre for Advanced Biomedical Imaging, University College London, London, United Kingdom; 2Institute of Neurology, University College London, United Kingdom; 3Cancer Institute, University College London, United Kingdom

We have recently developed a technique named glucoseCEST that enables the accumulation of exogeneously administered, unlabelled glucose to be detected in tumours. Here we present a technique that allows glucoseCEST measurements to be converted to an absolute glucose concentration. This approach is evaluated in two colorectal tumour xenograft models (SW1222 and LS174T) and compared with 18F-FDG autoradiography. Significant differences in uptake were observed between tumour cell lines in both FDG and glucose measurements. Median tumour glucose and FDG concentrations were also significant correlated. These results suggest that glucoseCEST and 18F-FDG autoradiogaphy (and therefore FDG-PET) may provide corresponding information.

 

11:36           0183.DCE-MRI & ICP-MS Evaluation of Biodistribution of Contrast Agents & Chemotherapeutic Agents to Gliomas with a New Pharmacological Approach in F98 Glioma Cells Implanted Fischer Rats

Jerome Cote1, Luc Tremblay2, David Fortin3, Fernand Gobeil4, Martin Lepage2

1CIMS, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada; 2CIMS, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada; 3Chirurgie, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada; 4Pharmacologie, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada

Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) with intravenous Gd-DTPA or Gadomer was used to monitor the selective increase of blood-brain barrier permeability at the tumor of glioma-bearing rats, induced by a novel pharmacological approach. Our results indicate that the biodistribution of both contrast agents within rat gliomas and surrounding brain tissues was doubled. This was confirmed by a two-fold increase (versus vehicle) of concentrations of Gd-DTPA and Carboplatin in tumor and peripheral tissues measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).

 

11:48           0184.Tumor Drug Resistance and Sodium-Diffusion MRI in Rat Glioma Model

Victor D. Schepkin1, Thomas Morgan2, Fabian Calixto-Bejarano3, Petr L. Gor'kov3, William Brey3, Chunqi Qian4, Shannon Gower-Winter5, Manuel Ozambela2, Cathy Levenson2

1CIMAR/MRI, NHMFL/FSU, Tallahassee, FL, United States; 2College of Medicine, FSU, Tallahassee, FL, United States; 3CIMAR/NMR, NHMFL/FSU, Tallahassee, FL, United States; 4NINDS, NIH, Bethesda, MD, United States; 5College of Medicine, FSU, Tallahassee, United States

During cancer progression, tumors develop mechanisms permitting them to obstruct chemotherapeutic interventions. To formulate individualized treatments it is important to provide a prompt and noninvasive assessment of tumor resistance. Mitochondria play a central role in ATP production, apoptosis and are associated with changes in tumor resistance. We hypothesize that the energy metabolism shift due to increased tumor resistance can affect sodium homeostasis, and MRI has the potential to reflect changes in tumor resistance. The results demonstrate that alterations in tumor resistance can be detected prior to treatment by sodium and diffusion MRI, allowing individualized adjustments to prevent ineffective treatments

 

Brain Tumor Imaging - Diagnosis & Response To Therapy

Room 201 10:00-12:00            Moderators: Marco Essig & David B. Hackney

10:00           0185.Probabilistic Functional Diffusion Maps (FDMs) in Human Glioblastoma

Benjamin M. Ellingson1, Timothy F. Cloughesy2, Albert Lai2, Phioanh L. Nghiemphu2, Whitney B. Pope1

1Radiological Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, United States; 2Neurology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, United States

Functional diffusion mapping (fDM) uses the voxel-wise changes in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measured in the same patient over time as a biomarker for cancer response to therapy. FDMS have been shown to be predictive of response and survival in glioblastoma under a variety of treatment paradigms. The current study develops a probabilistic approach to fDM quantification, where finite translational and rotational perturbations are performed after initial registration of ADC maps. These probabilistic fDMs were applied to newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients treated with standard radiochemotherapy (n = 143). Results suggest probabilistic fDMs have higher clinical sensitivity compared with traditional fDMs.

 

10:12           0186.Relating Radiation Dose to Microbleed Formation in Patients with Glioma

Janine M. Lupo1, Mekhail Anwar2, Christopher P. Hess1, Susan M. Chang3, Sarah J. Nelson1, 4

1Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, CA, United States; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, CA, United States; 3Department of Neurosurgery, University of California, San Francisco, CA, United States; 4Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, CA, United States

Despite the damage that radiation can cause to microvasculature, radiotherapy is an integral component in the management of patients with glioma. This study uses SWI to investigate the effects of radiation dose on microbleed characteristics in glioma patients with and without adjuvant anti-angiogenic therapy. The number of microbleeds was found to increase with escalating dose level at 2 years after radiation was administered. Microbleed size was not related to radiation dose and varied substantially in patients who received anti-angiogenic therapy. Although initially microbleeds occur in high dose regions, as time progressed, more microbleeds appear in lower dose regions.

 

10:24           0187.MRI-PET Guided Surgical Targeting & Generation of Parametric Maps Reflecting Cellular Proliferation & Microvascular Permeability in High Grade Gliomas

Mohan Pauliah1, Philip H. Gutin2, Heiko Schoder2, Cameron Brennan2, Michelle S. Bradbury3, 4

1Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York , United States; 2Neurosurgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, United States; 3Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, United States; 4Molecular Imaging, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, United States

By integrating functional and metabolic imaging technologies, increasingly more sensitive and specific read-outs reflecting the biological status of tumors may be obtained which, in turn, may improve characterization and direct targeted biopsy efforts. The purposes of our study are three-fold: (1) investigate the feasibility of deriving voxel-wise parameter estimates reflecting tumor cell proliferation, metabolic flux, and microvascular permeability in high grade glial tumors from precisely co-registered dynamic 18F-FLT PET and DCE-MRI with histologic correlation and (2) to investigate relationships among voxel-based determinations of PET- and MRI-based kinetic parameters during the first-pass and equilibrium phases of the study. In addition, targeted biopsy specimens were acquired using frameless stereotactic surgery and intraoperative MRI to determine whether parametric images are predictive of regional histologic assays of tumor cell proliferation and microvascular density. Quantitative accuracy of parametric images is also being evaluated through comparison of histologic determinations and gene expression differences, obtained at different biopsy locations, with the PET-MRI imaging features at those same locations. Given the high degree of heterogeneity of glial tumors, the molecular characteristics and functional imaging correlation on the same tumor areas may facilitate the development of novel therapies and yield increasingly more accurate prognostic information on the basis of key biomarkers.

 

10:36           0188.A Novel Whole-Brain DTI Segmentation Technique for Brain Tumour Delineation and Diagnosis

Timothy L. Jones1, B Anthony Bell1, Thomas R. Barrick2

1Academic Neurosurgery Unit, St Georges University of London, London, United Kingdom; 2Stroke and Dementia Research Centre, St Georges University of London, London, United Kingdom

Conventional MRI images of brain tumours likely underestimate the true extent of tumour and have variable sensitivity in diagnosis depending on tumour type. In this study, DTI scans were acquired from 94 patients with a range of brain tumours. We present a novel whole brain segmentation and visualisation technique which reveals potential tumour-specific diagnostic characteristics. Discriminant analysis of tumour characteristics reveals diagnostic sensitivities ranging from 84-100%

 

10:48           0189.Detecting & Quantifying 2HG & Alterations in Metabolite Profiles in IDH1/2 Mutation Bearing Brain Tumors by Solid State HRMAS NMR

Liya Wang1, Anne Carroll2, Juliya Kalinina3, Erwin Van Meir3, Qiqi Yu1, Junjun Tan2, Ruya Zhao2, Frank Liu4, Shaoxiong Wu4, Hui Mao5

1Radiology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, United States; 2Chemistry, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States; 3Neurosurgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, United States; 4NMR Center, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States; 5Radiology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States

Solid state high resolution (HR) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR methods were used to identify the spectroscopic ¡°finger print¡± of 2HG in brain tumor tissues to confirm that 2HG is the metabolite marker of IDH mutations. The metabolite profiles of gliomas with and without IDH mutations are investigated quantitatively. The results confirmed that 2HG is a highly specific metabolite marker of IDH mutations in gliomas. In addition, HRMAS NMR analysis provided quantitative metabolite analysis that revealed the altered metabolite profile in tumors bearing with IDH mutations

 

11:00           0190.Precise Ex-Vivo Histological Validation of Heightened Cellularity in Regions of Dark ADC in Three Cases of High-Grade Glioma

MAGNA25Peter S. LaViolette1, Elizabeth J. Cochran2, Alex D. Cohen3, Mona Al-Gizawiy1, Scott D. Rand, Jennifer Connelly4, Mark G. Malkin5, Wade M. Mueller6, Kathleen M. Schmainda7

1Radiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, United States; 2Pathology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, United States; 3Biophysics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, United States; 4Neurology, Medical College of Wisconsin; 5Neurology & Neurosurgery, Medical College of Wisconsin; 6Neurosurgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, United States; 7Radiology and Biophysics, Medical College of Wisconsin

AFMM (ADC FLAIR MisMatch) is defined as an area of low ADC within FLAIR abnormality associated with a brain tumor. The aim of this study is to determine if areas of AFMM represent increased cellularity by histologic analysis of spatially-correlated ex-vivo issue acquired and processed in three patients with high grade gliomas.

 

11:12           0191.In Vivo Spectroscopic Imaging of 2-Hydroxyglutarate in Human Brain Tumors at 3.0 T

Sandeep K. Ganji1, Abhishek Banerjee1, Zoltan Kovacs1, Ivan E. Dimitrov1, 2, Ralph J. DeBerardinis3, Craig M. Malloy1, Bruce Mickey4, Robert Bachoo5, Elizabeth A. Maher6, Changho Choi1

1Advanced Imaging Research Center, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States; 2Philips Medical Systems, Cleveland, OH, United States; 3Pediatrics, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States; 4Neurological Surgery, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States; 5Neurology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States; 6Internal Medicine, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States

2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG) is known to accumulate in a vast majority of low grade gliomas and secondary glioblastomas. We report in vivo spectroscopic imaging of 2HG using an optimized echo-time PRESS-based localization method at 3T in patients with gliomas. We present phantom and in vivo healthy volunteer validation data and show the elevated 2HG levels in tumor patients. Metabolite concentration maps are presented.

 

11:24           0192.Correlations Between PET & DTI Data in Newly Diagnosed GBM Patients Receiving Cediranib Scanned on a Hybrid PET/MR Scanner

Bjorn Stemkens1, 2, Summer Fakhro2, Daniel B. Chonde2, Marco C. Pinho2, Pavlina Polaskova2, Dominique L. Jennings2, Kyrre E. Emblem2, Elizabeth R. Gerstner3, Tracy T. Batchelor3, Ciprian Catana2

1Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Technology Eindhoven, Eindhoven, Netherlands; 2Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; 3Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States

Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and positron emission tomography (PET) are both imaging techniques that are able to provide information about tumor cellularity and infiltration in the peritumoral region. The purpose is to observe their response in glioblastoma treatment with anti-angiogenic drugs. PET and DTI data are collected simultaneously and baseline measurements are compared to day one after treatment onset. Significant negative correlations were found between mean standard uptake values (SUV) and fractional anisotropy (FA) in the peritumoral region. This implies that metabolic changes correlate with white matter directional changes.

 

11:36           0193.Non-Parametric and Non-Linear DSC-MRI Post-Processing Methods Predict Underlying Vascular Histopathology in Patients with Treatment-Naive GBM

MAGNA25Emma Essock-Burns1, 2, Joanna J. Phillips3, 4, Annette M. Molinaro3, Janine M. Lupo2, Soonmee Cha, 23, Susan M. Chang3, Sarah J. Nelson, 15

1Graduate Group in Bioengineering, UC Berkeley/UC San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States; 2Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, UC San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States; 3Neurological Surgery, UC San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States; 4Department of Pathology, UC San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States; 5Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, UC San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States

 

Choosing a biopsy location that reflects tumor grade is a challenge for diagnosis and treatment of patients with glioblastoma, a heterogeneous and vascularized brain tumor. Multiple post-processing methods exist to correct for contrast-agent extravasation in dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC)-MRI near glomeruloid vasculature and resulting CBV estimates can vary substantially. Vascular morphology of 72 image-guided biopsies from 35 de-novo GBM patients was measured with Factor VIII immunohistochemical staining and the corresponding DSC hemodynamic data analyzed using both non-linear and non-parametric post-processing techniques. This study provides histopathologial evidence that CBV estimates from both non-linear and non-parametric post-processing significantly predict underlying vascular morphology.

 

11:48           0194.Differentiation of Low- And High-Grade Pediatric Brain Tumors Using High B-Value Diffusion

Imaging with a Fractional Order Calculus Model

SUMMA25Y. Sui1, 2, H. Wang3, GZ Liu1, F. W. Damen1, C. Wanamaker4, YH Li5, X. J. Zhou1, 6

1Center for MR Research, University of Illinois Medical Center, Chicago, IL, United States; 2Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States; 3Applied Science Lab, GE Healthcare, Shanghai, China; 4Radiology, University of Illinois Medical Center, Chicago, IL; 5Radiology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai, China; 6Departments of Radiology, Neurosurgery and Bioengineering, University of Illinois Medical Center, Chicago, IL

The majority of diffusion MRI applications for brain tumor employed a single b-value to yield apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and/or fractional anisotropy using a mono-exponential model. This simple model disguises valuable information, such as tissue heterogeneity and microenvironment, for differential diagnosis. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of using a set of new parameters from the fractional order calculus (FROC) model to differentiate low-grade from high-grade pediatric brain tumors

 

DSC, Oxygenation & Reactivity

Room 202 10:00-12:00            Moderators: Fernando Calamante & Greg Zaharchuk

10:00           0195.Non-Parametric Quantification of Cerebral Haemodynamics from Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI

SUMMA25Amit Mehndiratta1, Bradley J. MacIntosh2, David E. Crane2, Stephen J. Payne3, Michael A. Chappell3

1Institute of Biomedical Engineering , University of Oxford, Oxford, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom; 2Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 3Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Oxford, Oxford, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom

DSC-MRI analysis is an ill-posed inverse problem involving deconvolution of the observed MR signal with an AIF. The current standard SVD methods underestimate perfusion with an oscillatory residue function whereas the alternative vascular model-based (VM) approach permits only predefined shapes that may not be appropriate in pathology. Here we propose a deconvolution method that can estimate perfusion along with a physiological plausible residue function without any bias to a specific class of functional shapes. Our results showed the perfusion estimates were comparable to VM and the method formulation ensures physiologically realistic smooth functions.

 

10:12           0196.Steady-State & Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Using USPIOs in Humans

SUMMA25Thomas Christen1, Deqiang Qiu1, Wendy Wei Ni1, Heiko Schmiedeskamp1, Roland Bammer1, Michael Moseley1, Greg Zaharchuk1

1Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States

In this study, we acquired both steady-state and dynamic susceptibility CBV maps using ferumoxytol (an FDA-approved ultra-small paramagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) compound) in 4 volunteers and compared the quantitative values at different doses and spatial resolutions. The results show similar patterns between all the maps and average blood volumes that are consistent with prior literature values. The study suggests that high-resolution quantitative CBV maps can be obtained with the proposed steady-state approach and could be used to detect smaller lesions.

 

10:24           0197.Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI: Compromising Perfusion Accuracy for a Better Discrimination of Hypoperfused Tissue

Birgitte Fuglsang Kjølby1, Søren Christensen2, Irene Klærke Mikkelsen1, Kim Mouriden1, Peter Gall3, Valerij G. Kiselev3, Leif Østergaard1

1CFIN, Department of Neuroradiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 2Department of Neurology and Radiology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia; 3Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical Physics, University Hospital Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany

In perfusion DSC-MRI, the precision (random error) and accuracy (systematic bias) of perfusion estimates rely critically on the noise regularization used in the deconvolution process. Existing methods are commonly optimized for the best reproducibility of ’true’ perfusion values. We show that this accuracy is obtained at the expense of precision, which negatively impacts the ability to identify critical hypoperfusion thresholds. We propose a frequency-domain optimized regularization favoring precision. This approach reveals that optimal regularization depends critically on signal to noise ratio, sampling rate and AIF shape. Application of this method to simulated data improves discrimination of hypoperfused tissue.

 

10:36           0198.Characterizing the Susceptibility Calibration Factor in Heterogeneous Vascular Networks

MAGNA25Natenael B. Semmineh1, Junzhong Xu, C Chad Quarles2

1institute of imaging science, Vanderbilt University, nashville, TN, United States; 2institute of Imaging science, Vanderbilt University, Nasville, TN

The use of DSC-MRI in tumors can be confounded by the assumption that a linear relationship, with a spatially uniform rate constant termed the vascular susceptibility calibration factor (kp), exists between the contrast agent (CA) concentration and the measured transverse relaxation rate change. Using simulations we demonstrate that vascular susceptibility calibration factors found in tumor-like vessel trees are significantly different than those found in normal tissue.

 

10:48           0199.In Vivo Imaging of Vessel Diameter, Size & Density: A Comparative Study between MRI & Histology

Benjamin Lemasson1, 2, Samuel Valable1, 3, Régine Farion1, 2, Alexandre Krainik1, 2, Chantal Rémy1, 2, Emmanuel L. Barbier1, 2

1U836, Inserm, Grenoble, France; 2Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, Université Joseph Fourier, Grenoble, France; 3UMR 6232, CNRS, Caen, France

The purpose of the study was to compare MRI and histological estimates of the mean vessel diameter (mVD), the vessel density (Density), and the vessel size index (VSI) obtained in the same tumor-bearing animals (C6 and RG2 models). MRI and histology differed by -15 to 26%. A positive correlation was found between MRI and histology for mVD, Density, and VSI counterparts (R²=0.62, 0.50, 0.73, respectively; p<0.001 in all cases). As Density and mVD or VSI provide complementary information, it is worth computing them to characterize angiogenesis beyond blood volume fraction.

 

11:00           0200.Is the T2* Relaxivity of Gadolinium in Brain Microvasculature Linear with Concentration?

MAGNA25Vishal Patil1, Glyn Johnson1

1Radiology, NYU School of Medicine, New York, United States

Generally, linearity is assumed between T2* relaxation and gadolinium concentration, but it is well known that compartmentalization and secondary magnetic field perturbations generate deviations from linearity in vivo. In this study we test the reliability of both linear and non-linear relaxivity expressions estimating cerebral blood volume in grey and white matter at different field strengths and echo times. Results show that the non-linear expression yields remarkable agreement between tissue measurements while the linear expression systematically over and under estimates blood volume depending on imaging parameters, emphasizing the problem in finding a single linear relaxation relationship that fits multiple field strengths.

 

11:12           0201.Vessel Size Index and Cerebral Blood Volume Maps Using Hypercapnic Contrast at 3T

Thomas Christen1, Georges Hankov1, Heiko Schmiedeskamp1, Roland Bammer1, Greg Zaharchuk1

1Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States

The objective of this study was to use the variations in R2 and R2* relaxation times induced by the inhalation of carbogen (95% O2, 5% CO2) to create parametric maps of the Vessel Size Index and Cerebral Blood Volume. The use of a gradient and spin echo EPI sequence allowed the acquisition of VSI and CBV values simultaneously with a high temporal resolution. This enabled the determination of a stable period during which the estimates are accurate. The measurements were performed in 5 healthy volunteers at 3.0T and the values obtained were in accord with past studies.

 

11:24           0202.Assessment of Regional Rates of Change in CBF in Response to Changes in PaCO2: A Combined ASL & Phase Contrast Study

Noam Alperin1, Ahmet M. Bagci1, Jessica Schmidtman1, Andreas Pomschar2, Birgit Ertl-Wagner2, Clinton Wright1

1University of Miami, Miami, FL, United States; 2University of Munich, Munich, Germany

A method for assessment of regional cerebral blood perfusion in response to changes in PaCO2 is presented. The method combines PASL in conjunction with anatomical T1W imaging for assessment of regional CBF values at different states of PaCO2 and phase contrast based measurements of total CBF. Since it is well established that global CBF is linearly related to PaCO2, the phase contrast based tCBF measurements eliminates the need for direct measurements of PaCO2, which are invasive. Preliminary results in healthy subjects demonstrate differences in auto regulation between brain regions supplied by the anterior and posterior circulation.

 

11:36           0203.Calibration & Implementation of Quantitative Blood Oxygenation Measurement at 7T

SUMMA25Lisa C. Krishnamurthy1, 2, Jinsoo Uh1, Ivan Dimitrov1, 3, Feng Xu1, Peiying Liu1, Kim Kangasniemi1, Hanzhang Lu1

1Advanced Imaging Research Center, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States; 2Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, UT Arlington, Arlington, TX, United States; 3Philips Medical Systems, Cleveland, OH, United States

Quantification of cerebral venous oxygenation have demonstrated potential utility in normalization of fMRI signals, evaluation of brain metabolism, and understanding brain disorders. To date, all such studies have been performed at the field strength of 3T or lower. Given the field dependence of deoxyhemoglobin susceptibility effects, it is reasonable to expect that 7T may provide an advantage in improving the sensitivity of these techniques. We have established a calibration plot between blood T2 and oxygenation at 7T for various hematocrit levels. We have also implemented a recently developed TRUST MRI technique at 7T and determined venous blood T2 in vivo.

 

11:48           0204.Cerebrovascular Reactivity in the Brain White Matter: Magnitude, Temporal Delays & Age Effects

MAGNA25Binu P. Thomas1, 2, Peiying Liu1, Denise Park3, Matthias J.P. van Osch4, Hanzhang Lu1

1Advanced Imaging Research Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States; 2Bioengineering, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center/University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX, United States; 3Center for Vital Longevity, University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas, TX, United States; 4Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands

Vascular properties of brain’s white matter (WM) were examined. Cerbrovascular reactivity (CVR), baseline cerebral blood flow (CBF) and structural MPRAGE scans were obtained from healthy volunteers: 15 young (27±5) and 15 elderly (75±7) years. Temporal delay in BOLD CVR response from gray matter (GM) to WM was calculated. Response was slower in young (20.8 sec) and faster in older subjects (12.26 sec), (p=0.003). The response amplitude (%BOLD/mmHgCO2) is higher in WM (p=0.048) and lower in GM (p=0.005) in older subjects compared to young. Baseline CBF was higher in WM (p=0.072) and lower in GM (p=0.001) in old compared to young.

 

MR-Guided Intravascular & Percutaneous Interventions

Room 210-211 10:00-12:00            Moderators: John A. Carrino & R. Jason Stafford

10:00           0205.A Closed-Loop MRI-Powered Actuator for Robotic Interventions

SUMMA25Lei Qin1, Panagiotis Vartholomeos2, Pierre Dupont2

1Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, United States; 2Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, MA, United States

This paper presents a novel closed-loop controlled actuation technology for robotically assisted MRI-guided interventional procedures. Compact and wireless, the actuators are both powered and controlled by the MRI scanner. The principle of operation is based on one or more small ferromagnetic bodies embedded in the actuator that serves to convert the electromagnetic energy of the MR gradients into mechanical energy. A MR tracking sequence is performed to track the position of the needle in real-time for closed-loop control. A prototype was constructed, which showed accurate control of the needle.

 

10:12           0206.MRI-Compatible Voltage-Based Electro-Anatomic Mapping System for Cardiac Electrophysiological Interventions

Zion Tsz Ho Tse1, Charles L. Dumoulin2, Ronald Watkins3, Israel Byrd4, Jeffrey Schweitzer4, Raymond Y. Kwong5, Gregory F. Michaud5, William G. Stevenson5, Ehud J. Schmidt1

1Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; 2Radiology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center; 3Radiology, Stanford University; 4Atrial Fibrillation Division, St Jude Medical, Inc.; 5Cardiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School

An MRI-compatible St Jude Medical EnSite NavX (ESN) voltage-based navigational system was used for Electro-Anatomic-Mapping (EAM) and catheter tracking during MR imaging. The system also allowed Electro-Physiological (EP) procedures to be performed inside and outside MRI. The ESN was equipped with an electronic blanking circuit to block ESN tracking signals during gradient-ramps-&-radiofrequency transmission (GR&RF). EP catheters with MR-tracking coils and ESN tracking electrodes were used. The ESN was validated in a cardiac phantom and three swine models with EAM and simultaneous imaging. The system showed <6mm catheter positional error, <1oC temperature rise, and <5% image quality reduction.

 

10:24           0207.Comparison between Multi-Contrast Late Enhancement Magnetic Resonance Imaging & Electroanatomical Voltage Mapping, for Ventricular Tachycardia Substrate Characterization, Using a Real-Time MR-Guided Electrophysiology System

SUMMA25Samuel O. Oduneye1, 2, Labonny Biswas2, Roey Flor2, Sudip Ghate2, Venkat Ramanan2, Jennifer Barry2, Graham A. Wright1, 2

1Medical Biophysics, University Of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 2Imaging Research, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Integration of MRI-derived scar maps with electroanatomical mapping (EAM) has implications for catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia and for targeting the scarred regions. The purpose of this study was to compare the potentially arrhythmogenic regions and characterize the relationship and morphology between chronic myocardial scar detectable by multi-contrast late enhancement (MCLE) MRI and EAM of endocardial substrate obtained with a real-time MR-guided electrophysiology system.

 

10:36           0208.Parallel Transmit with Integrated Toroidal Transceive Device Visualization

MAGNA25Maryam Etezadi-Amoli1, Pascal Stang1, Adam Kerr1, John Pauly1, Greig Scott1

1Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States

A toroidal transceiver enables high-SNR positive contrast visualization of conductive interventional devices such as guidewires and EP catheters. Effective device visualization can be achieved with very low transmit power levels (~12mW). Integration within a parallel transmit platform is a promising approach to RF safety during interventional procedures.

 

10:48           0209.Remote MR-Compatible Catheter Navigation System

Mohammad Ali Tavallaei1, 2, Yogesh Thakur3, Syed Haider1, Maria Drangova1, 4

1Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario, Canada; 2Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada; 3Radiology, Vancouver Coastal Health Authority, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 4Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada

An MR compatible master-slave robot for catheter navigation is described. The robot uses a master/slave approach, where the motions of a catheter manipulated by the interventionalist are measured by the master, an embedded system sends commands to a pair of ultrasonic motors and an MR compatible manipulator replicates the interventionalist’s motions on a patient catheter within the magnet bore. The accuracy of the system in remotely controlling the position of the catheter in the magnet, its time delay and the effect of the system on image SNR is evaluated. This robot promises to facilitate MRI guided catheterization procedures.

 

11:00           0210.Initial in vivo Experience with a Novel Type of Fully MR-Safe Detachable Coils for MR-Guided Embolizations

Ann-Kathrin Homagk1, Reiner Umathum1, Michael Bock2, Wolfhard Semmler1, Peter Hallscheidt3

1Dept. of Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany; 2Dept. of Radiology, Medical Physics, University Hospital Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany; 3Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany

Conventional detachable embolization coils are made from platinum or stainless steel, and may thus be an MR safety hazard due to resonant device heating. In this work a novel type of non-metallic and therefore intrinsically MR safe embolization coils is investigated in a pig model. The contrast enhanced injection of three polymer embolization coils into the renal artery was monitored in real time. 40 minutes after embolization, the perfusion deficit was clearly identified on high resolution contrast enhanced 3D FLASH data sets. With this initial experiment, the usability of the novel polymer coils for MR-guided embolization procedures could be demonstrated.

 

11:12           0211.DBS Electrode Positioning Accuracy in the STN & GPi with Intraoperative MR Guidance

Alastair Martin1, Paul Larson1, Geoffrey Bates2, Philip Starr1

1University of California - San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States; 2MRI Interventions, Irvine, CA, United States

MR guided DBS electrode implantation is evaluated in a series of patients with Parkinson’s disease and dystonia. Both the STN and GPi are targeted and a novel optimized implantation system is employed. Targeting accuracies of 0.7±0.4mm were achieved when targeting both the STN and GPi and only a single brain penetration was necessary in 97% of electrodes implanted. There was no demonstrable bias in the direction of the error with either target. The achieved results with the optimized system are shown to exceed those obtained with our initial DBS implantation approach.

 

11:24           0212.Spinal Infiltrations & Biopsies Using an Advanced Real-Time MR Guidance Approach: Preliminary Clinical Report

Elodie Breton1, Eva Rothgang2, 3, Li Pan2, Julien Garnon4, Georgia Tsoumakidou4, Xavier Buy4, Christine H. Lorenz2, Michel de Mathelin1, Afshin Gangi, 14

1LSIIT - AVR, University of Strasbourg - CNRS, Strasbourg, France; 2Center for Applied Medical Imaging, Siemens Corporate Research, Baltimore, MD, United States; 3Pattern Recognition Lab, Friedrich-Alexander University, Erlangen, Germany; 4Interventional Radiology Department, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Strasbourg, France

The multiplanar imaging capabilities of MR are of great advantage for real-time needle guidance. The focus of this work is to clinically evaluate an advanced MR guidance approach for percutaneous needle interventions providing an interactive, real-time multi-slice pulse sequence (Beat_IRTTT) in combination with an interventional MRI software package (Interactive Front End, IFE). This approach was used for 9 spinal infiltrations and 6 abdominal biopsies. To our experience, automatic real-time slice alignment greatly simplifies the workflow. The proposed real-time slice layout with three slices along the planned trajectory orthogonal to each other further allows for efficient and safe needle placement.

 

11:36           0213.MRI-Guided Sclerotherapy of Low-Flow Vascular Malformations at 1.5T Using Tri-Plane Gradient-Echo Pulse Sequences with Variable Frame Rates: Our Experience and Imaging Times

Gurpreet S. Sandhu1, Jamal J. Derakhshan1, Jeffrey L. Duerk1, Jeffrey L. Sunshine1, Mark A. Griswold1, Daniel P. Hsu1

1Radiology, University Hospitals, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, United States

Multiplanar imaging is a crucial advantage in diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) when compared to other imaging modalities. Our group uses fast tri-plane gradient-echo pulse sequences for image-guided minimally invasive procedures. These sequences allow alignment of each of the three imaging planes in any desired orientation. Tri-plane imaging enables concurrent visualization of the interventional device and target lesion as well as adjacent vital structures. Now, we have developed different versions of these sequences with higher frame rates. We describe our experience including needle time with these sequences for MRI-guided sclerotherapy of low-flow vascular malformations on a 1.5T imaging system.

 

11:48           0214.MR-Guided Sclerotherapy of Vascular & Lymphatic Malformations: Our First Year Experiences

Paul Allen DiCamillo1, Wesley D. Gilson2, Aaron J. Flammang2, Li Pan2, Jonathan S. Lewin1, Clifford R. Weiss3

1Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States; 2Siemens Corporate Research, Baltimore, MD, United States; 3Vascular and Interventional Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States

Venous malformations (VM) and lymphatic malformations (LM) are congenital lesions that may develop anywhere in the body, leading to functional or cosmetic impairment, pain or bleeding. These lesions are typically treated percutaneously using ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance. However, certain lesion locations complicate treatment by those modalities. Real-time MR-guided intervention serves as a safer alternative, with better visualization of surrounding critical soft tissue structures. We present our first year of experience with this technique using a short bore 1.5T MRI/X-Ray "Miyabi" suite

 

Off Resonance & Eddy Current Artifact Correction

Room 212-213 10:00-12:00            Moderators: Clemens Bos & Graeme McKinnon

10:00           0215.Magnetic Resonance Encephalography Reconstruction with Magnetic Field Monitoring

SUMMA25Frederik Testud1, Jakob Assländer1, Christoph Barmet2, Thimo Hugger1, Benjamin Zahneisen1, Klaas Prüssmann2, Jürgen Hennig1, Maxim Zaitsev1

1Medical Physics, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany; 2Biomedical Engineering, University & ETH Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland

In the last years field probes have been used for dynamic magnetic field monitoring in order to reduce image artifacts due to imperfect gradient coils and amplifiers, eddy currents, B0 drifts and patient breathing by taking the measured field dynamics into account in the image reconstruction. Long Magnetic Resonance Encephalography experiments suffer from B0 and gradient drifts. These can be corrected for by interleaved measurement of the k-space trajectory and the imaging experiment. This is performed in the present work with 4 </sub>1H field probes combined with 28 channels of a 95 channel head coil.

 

10:12           0216.Higher-Order Monitoring of Physiological Field Fluctuations in Brain MRI at 7T

MAGNA25Signe Johanna Vannesjo1, Christoph Barmet1, Yolanda Duerst1, Simon Gross1, David O. Brunner1, Klaas P. Pruessmann1

1Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University and ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland

Field fluctuations caused by breathing and limb motion can have a strong degrading effect on quality of brain images at high fields. Partly, the resulting artifacts can be corrected for by proper f0-demodulation of the object signal, based on field data from navigators or concurrent field monitoring. In this work, we investigate the contribution of higher-order field components to the perturbations, and use concurrent field monitoring up to 2nd order to additionally improve image quality in high-resolution T2*-weighted GRE sequences.e 2nd-order concurrent field monitoring to correct for induced artifacts.

 

10:24           0217.A New Type of Gradient: The Detection Frequency Gradient. a New Capability: Retrospective Shimming

Jonathan C. Sharp1, Scott B. King2, Mike Smith2, Boguslaw Tomanek1

1Institute for Biodiagnostics (West), National Research Council of Canada, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; 2Institute for Biodiagnostics, National Research Council of Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

We introduce a new type of field gradient: the Detection Frequency Gradient (DFG), with detection frequency defined as ω EMF - ω PRECESSION. This gradient has some interesting properties, most notably the ability to adjust the shim retrospectively (post-acquisition). This represents genuine B0-shimming: signals from spins dephased by unwanted B0-gradients are brought back in to phase. This capability arises from a dynamically-defined B1 detector field, synthesized retrospectively by a time-dependent weighted combination of NMR signals from a receive coil array. Applications include post-acquisition shimming and eddy-current correction. The signal weightings are calculated from receiver coil field maps and a target B0-inhomogeneity.

 

10:36           0218.Automatic Off-Resonance Correction with Piecewise Linear Autofocus

SUMMA25Travis Smith1, Krishna Nayak1

1Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States

We present a new method to correct off-resonance blurring in spiral and radial images without knowledge of the field map. The image is divided into blocks and linear field map estimation and correction are performed on each block. The local linear coefficients are estimated through a combination of k-space spectral analysis and mapdrift, an image-domain correlation technique. The deblurring performance is comparable to field map-based techniques. The method does not use objective functions, requires only a blurry image (magnitude and phase) and a trajectory time map, and is suitable for low-SNR and fine-resolution images.

 

10:48           0219.Novel Automatic Off-Resonance Correction Without Field Maps in Spiral Imaging Using L1 Minimization

Hisamoto Moriguchi1, Kohki Yoshikawa2, Morio Shimada2, Shin-ichi Urayama3, Yutaka Imai1, Manabu Honda4, Takashi Hanakawa4

1Radiology, Tokai University, Isehara, Kanagawa, Japan; 2Radiological Sciences, Komazawa University, Tokyo, Japan; 3Human Brain Research Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; 4Functional Brain Research, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Tokyo, Japan

A primary disadvantage of spiral imaging is blurring artifacts due to off-resonance effects. Most spiral off-resonance correction methods require a frequency field map. However, to acquire a field map increases the scan time. In this study, a novel spiral automatic off-resonance correction method without field maps has been demonstrated. In the newly proposed method, L1 minimization is used as a new criterion to determine the correct off-resonance frequencies. Frequency estimation process of the L1 min off-resonance correction is robust and the estimated field map shows reduced errors. The L1 min off-resonance correction has significant potential for faster spiral acquisition.

 

11:00           0220.Chemical Species Separation with Simultaneous Estimation of Field Map & T2* Using a K-Space Formulation

MAGNA25Jose Luis Honorato1, 2, Vicente Parot, 12, Cristian Tejos1, 2, Sergio Uribe2, 3, Pablo Irarrazaval, 12

1Electrical Engineering, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago, Chile; 2Biomedical Imaging Center, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago, Chile; 3Department of Radiology, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago, Chile

In this abstract we present a novel technique for chemical species separation using a signal model formulated entirely in k-space. The model includes T2* decay, field inhomogeneity and a variable time map. By using a variable time map this method is able to separate species without artifacts produced by chemical shift, field inhomogeneity or T2* decay.

 

11:12           0221.Image Denoising Exploiting Sparsity & Low Rank Approximation (DSLR) in Slide Encoding for Metal Artifact Correction

MAGNA25Sangcheon Choi1, Hahnsung Kim2, Jaeseok Park1

1Brain and Cognitive Engineering, Korea University, Seoul, Korea, Republic of; 2Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea, Republic of

Metal-induced field inhomogeneity is one of the major concerns in magnetic resonance imaging near metallic implants. Slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC) is an effective way to correct severe metal artifacts by employing additional z-phase encoding steps for each excited slice against metal-induced field inhomogeneity and view angle tilting (VAT). Despite the advantages of metal artifact correction, since noisy resolved pixels are included in image reconstruction, SEMAC suffers from noise amplification. SEMAC with noise reduction , which employs a two-step approach (rank-1 approximation along the coil dimension followed by soft thresholding in the slice direction), does not consider noise correlation of coils and results in a direct tradeoff between image accuracy and de-noising. Thus, to further expedite noise reduction in SEMAC, in this work we develop a novel image de-noising algorithm that exploits 1) low-rank approximation using strong correlation of pixels (x-z) in the slice direction (t), 2) Best Linear Unbiased Estimator (BLUE) image combination in the coil direction with noise correlation, and 3) recovery of distorted slice profile using the sparsity of signals in the slice direction with orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP).

 

11:24           0222.Extracting Phase Contrast from MAVRIC Images Near Metal Implants

Kevin M. Koch1, Matthew F. Koff2, Weitian Chen3, Hollis G. Potter2

1Applied Science Laboratory, GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI, United States; 2Department of Radiology and Imaging, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY, United States; 3Applied Science Laboratory, GE Healthcare, Menlo Park, CA, United States

The MAVRIC Multi-Spectral Imaging technique acquires 4D datasets, resolving spins around metal implants in space and Larmor frequency offset. Here, we demonstrate a novel processing technique that extracts phase-contrast images from conventional MAVRIC acquisitions. Dominant trends induced by metal hardware in the phased images are removed to reveal underlying tissue with phase-contrast. The presented method may offer a means to differentiate types of adverse tissue responses near metal implants.

 

11:36           0223.Fully-Refocused Spatiotemporally-Encoded MRI: Robust MR Imaging in the Presence of Metallic Implants

SUMMA25Noam Ben-Eliezer1, Eddy Solomon2, Elad Harel3, Nava Nevo4, Lucio Frydman2

1Center for Biomedical Imaging, New-York University, New-York, NY, United States; 2Chemical-Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel; 3Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, United States; 4Biological-Regulation, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel

A new MR encoding approach has been recently introduced based on sequential encoding of the image spatial domain. An interesting aspect of this Spatiotemporal-Encoding (SPEN) technique, stems from its ability to carry out a progressive, voxel-by-voxel refocusing of all T2* dephasing throughout the data acquisition, allowing it to overcome sizable field inhomogeneities. This work demonstrated SPEN’s potential for imaging near metallic implants, using in-vivo mouse models. Cartesian and Back-Projected SPEN MRI were implemented on a 7T microimaging unit, and compared versus conventional Spin-Echo scheme analogues. In all cases, unambiguously superior images arise from the fully refocused spatiotemporally-encoded protocols.

 

11:48           0224.Effective & Flexible Eddy Current Compensation for Delta Relaxation Enhanced MR Imaging

Uvo Christoph Hoelscher1, Peter Michael Jakob2, 3

1Research Center for Magnetic Resonance Bavaria , Wuerzburg, Germany; 2Experimental Physics 5 (Biophysics), University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg, Germany; 3Research Center for Magnetic Resonance Bavaria, Wuerzburg, Germany

A new imaging method called dreMR uses a variable B0 field to generate a novel MR contrast. The variable B0 field induces eddy currents which substantially decrease the quality of dreMR images. The abstract presents a compensation method which can easily be implemented in the scanner software. The method can be used for any imaging sequence, does not require additional hardware and reduces the eddy current artifacts to a very small level.

 

CV Function

Room 219-220 10:00-12:00            Moderators: Sebastian Kozerke & Michael Salerno

10:00           0225.High Spatial and Temporal Resolution 2D Real Time and 3D Whole-Heart Cardiac Cine MRI Using Compressed Sensing and Parallel Imaging with Golden Angle Radial Trajectory

SUMMA25Li Feng1, 2, Jian Xu3, Leon Axel4, Daniel Sodickson4, Ricardo Otaz14

1Radiology , New York University School of Medicine, New York, United States; 2Sackler Institute of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, New York University School of Medicine, New York, United States; 3Siemens Medical Solutions, New York, United States; 4Radiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, United States

Cardiac cine MRI is valuable for imaging myocardial function. High spatial and temporal resolutions are desirable to improve diagnostic utility. In this study, we propose a joint reconstruction algorithm that combines compressed sensing and parallel imaging for highly undersampled golden angle radial k-space acquisitions, to enable 2D real-time and 3D whole-heart cardiac cine MRI with previously inaccessible spatial and temporal resolution. The technique allows reconstruction of the same data set with different temporal resolutions. We demonstrate the feasibility of 2D real-time cine imaging with 11ms temporal resolution and 3D whole-heart cine imaging with an acquisition window of 22.4ms per partition.

 

10:12           0226.Mapping Regional Right Ventricular Myocardial Strain Using 3D Cine DENSE MRI

SUMMA25Daniel A. Auger1, Xiaodong Zhong2, Frederick H. Epstein3, Bruce S. Spottiswoode1, 4

1MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa; 2MR R&D Collaborations, Siemens Healthcare, Atlanta, GA, United States; 3Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, United States; 4Division of Radiology, University of Stellenbosch, Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa

The mechanics of the right ventricle (RV) are notoriously difficult to quantify because of the RV’s thin wall and irregular geometry. However, the recently developed spiral 3D cine DENSE MRI technique is well suited to imaging the RV. This work presents model-free techniques to study the myocardial mechanics of the RV at a high spatial resolution using spiral 3D cine DENSE MRI. These involve tailored post-processing algorithms for mid-wall tissue tracking and strain estimation. The RV is subdivided into four regions according to anatomical landmarks, and the temporal evolution of strain is assessed for a group of normal volunteers.

 

10:24           0227.Dual Heart-Phase Cardiac DTI Using Local-Look STEAM

SUMMA25Christian Torben Stoeck1, Nicolas Toussaint2, Peter Boesiger1, Sebastian Kozerke1, 2

1Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University and ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 2Imaging Sciences, King's College London, London, United Kingdom

Analysis of diffusion tensor imaging of the myocardium reveals insight into cardiac mechanics. Previous studies investigated myocardial architecture at different states of cardiac contraction in ex-vivo animal hearts or by interpreting the strain tensor. In this study we present an initial direct comparison of systolic vs. diastolic fiber architecture of the in-vivo human heart based on diffusion weighted images acquired at both time points during the cardiac cycle using a local-look STEAM sequence.

 

10:36           0228.In Vivo Assessment of Myofiber Dynamics in the Human Heart Using Supertoroidal Analysis of Diffusion Tensor MRI

Choukri Mekkaoui1, Sonia Nielles-Vallespin2, Peter Gatehouse2, Marcel P. Jackowski3, David Firmin2, David E. Sosnovik4

1Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; 2Royal Brompton Hospital; 3University of São Paulo; 4Harvard Medical School - Massachusetts General Hospital

Supertoroidal analysis provides a novel formalism to analyze diffusion tensor MRI (DTI) data in the heart. Here, for the first time, we use supertoroids to analyze in vivo DTI datasets from normal human volunteers. We show that the volumetric nature of supertroidal-derived indices makes them extremely sensitive to changes in the diffusion eigenvalues. The orientation of the toroids (primary diffusion eigenvector) changes little as the myocardium contracts, except in the subepicardium. However, toroidal volume and curvature both decrease significantly as the myocardium contracts, reflecting a reduction in diffusion anisotropy in the myocardium during systole.

 

10:48           0229.Temporal Features of Edema in Acute Myocardial Infarction: T2 Maps Vs T2-STIR

SUMMA25Avinash Kali1, 2, Andreas Kumar3, Dror Berel2, Veronica L M Rundell4, Richard Tang2, James Min2, Rohan Dharmakumar2, 4

1University of California, Los Angeles, CA, United States; 2Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, United States; 3Laval University, Laval, QC, Canada; 4Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, United States

The temporal features of myocardial edema during ischemia and post-reperfusion were studied using T2 maps and T2-STIR images. Relative edema, infarct volumes and myocardial salvage were measured at baseline, during ischemia and one and 8 weeks post-reperfusion. Relative to baseline, a significant edema volume was apparent during ischemia, but was markedly elevated and remained constant up to one-week post-reperfusion, and regressed to baseline levels by week 8. Ischemic edema volume was not indicative of post-reperfusion edema volume. Myocardial salvage was constant for one-week post-reperfusion. T2 maps and T2-STIR images appear to provide equivalent information on myocardial edema and salvage.

 

11:00           0230.Myocardial Velocity & T2 Mapping Reveals Changes in LV Structure & Function After Heart Transplantation

MAGNA25Rahul Rustogi1, Mauricio Galizia1, Jeremy Collins1, Darshit Thakrar1, Asad Usman1, Bernd Jung2, Daniela Foell3, Saurabh Shah4, James Carr1, Michael Markl1

1Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, United States; 2Medical Physics, Freiburg University Medical Center, Freiburg, Germany; 3Cardiology, Freiburg University Medical Center, Freiburg, Germany; 4Siemens Healthcare, Chicago, United States

In a pilot study using a small cohort of post cardiac transplantation patients, we demonstrate the ability of novel non-invasive myocardial velocity mapping and T2 mapping to reveal underlying changes in myocardial structure and function. T2 maps assess myocardial edema while myocardial velocity maps detect changes in diastolic relaxation. Post transplant patients showed significant heterogeneity in distribution of T2 relaxation times and reduced peak radial and long axis velocities compared with normal control subjects. Very good agreement was found between independent readers indicating myocardial velocity mapping to be a highly reproducible method for assessing diastolic dysfunction.

 

11:12           0231.Subepicardial Dysfunction Leads to Global Left Ventricular Systolic Impairment in Patients with Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2I

Kieren G. Hollingsworth1, Tracey A. Willis2, Ben J. Dixon1, Hanns Lochmuller2, Kate Bushby2, John Bourke2, Guy A. MacGowan2, Andrew M. Blamire1, Volker Straub2

1Newcastle Magnetic Resonance Centre, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, Tyne and Wear, United Kingdom; 2Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, Tyne and Wear, United Kingdom

The assessment of cardiac involvement is important in Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2I, and the mechanisms of cardiac disease in this disease remain to be understood. For the first time, this study combines the techniques of MR cine imaging, MR tagged imaging and MR spectroscopy to assess a large group (n=11) of British patients. As a group, peak cardiac torsion and ejection fraction are significantly reduced in LGMD2I, and the deficit in these two measures is strongly correlated. The relationship between circumferential strain and cardiac torsion suggests subepicardial dysfunction, distinct from previous results on Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

 

11:24           0232.Myocardial Tagging Reveals a Distinct Regional Contractility Pattern After Ischemic Postconditioning in Mice

Wouter Oosterlinck1, Tom Dresselaers2, Vincent Geldhof1, Marijke Pellens1, Stefan Janssens1, Uwe Himmelreich2, Paul Herijgers1

1Cardiovascular Diseases, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; 2Medical Diagnostic Sciences, Biomedical NMR-Unit/MoSAIC, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium

We studied ischemia reperfusion and Ischemic Postconditioning in mice. Follow up included non invasive cMRI and myocardial tagging and invasive pressure conductance analysis after 1 and 10 weeks. We studied global and regional contractility changes and evaluated the effect of Ischemic Postconditioning at long term.

 

11:36           0233.Correlation between Spatial Differences in Action Potential Duration & Myocardial Dysfunction in Transgenic LQT2 Rabbits

Bernd Jung1, Daniela Foell2, Corinna Lang2, David Ziupa2, Gerlind Franke2, Stefanie Perez Feliz2, Michael Brunner2, Gideon Koren3, Manfred Zehender2, Katja E. Odening2

1Radiology, Medical Physics, University Medical Center, Freiburg, Germany; 2Cardiology, University Medical Center, Freiburg, Germany; 3Cardiovascular Research Center, Division of Cardiology, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, United States

Transgenic LQT2 rabbits and wildtype controls were subjected to in vivo phase contrast MRI in a 1.5T MR-system to assess regional myocardial velocities in the LV (AHA 16-segment model). The same rabbits’ hearts were subsequently Langendorff-perfused and subjected to ex vivo epicardial monophasic action potential measurements to assess APD in the corresponding segments. Prolongation of cardiac repolarization and increased dispersion of APD lead to a globally and regionally impaired systolic and diastolic function in transgenic LQT2 rabbits. Moreover, regional APDs correlate with regional peak diastolic velocities indicating that Long-QT syndrome is not purely an electrical but rather an electromechanical disorder.

 

11:48           0234.SSAT Inducer as a Potential Treatment for Obesity-Related Heart Failure

Jun Lu1, Mingming Li2, Beau Pontre3, Stephen Pickup4, Anothny Phillips2, Garth JS Cooper2

1Faculty of Health & Environmental Sciences, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, North Island, New Zealand; 2School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; 3Centre for Advanced MRI, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; 4Dept of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States

This project uses High-Field MRI to study cardiac function and body fat composition of obese mice and the effects of the treatment by diethylnorspermidine, a potent inducer of spermidine/spermine acetyltransferase

 

Clinical Intensive Course

Neurologic Infections & Inflammation in Adults

Organizers: Pia C. Maly Sundgren, M.D., Ph.D. & John D. Port, M.D., Ph.D.

Room 105-106 10:00-12:00            Moderators: Elna-Marie Larsson, M.D., Ph.D. & Bradford A. Moffat, Ph.D.

10:00           . Overview of Regional Differences

Kazuhiro Tsuchiya, M.D.

 

10:30           . Bacterial Infections in the CNS in the Immune & Immune Compromised Host

Cheng-Hong Toh, M.D.

 

11:00           . Viral Infections in the CNS in the Immune & Immune Compromised Host

Walter Kucharczyk, M.D., F.R.C.P.C.

 

11:30           . Mimics & Parasitic Infections of the CNS

Patricia M. Desmond, M.D.

 

12:00           . Adjournment

 

Clinical Intensive Course

Liver MRI

Organizers: Shahid M. Hussain, M.D., Caroline Reinhold, M.D. & Evis Sala, M.D., Ph.D., F.R.C.R.

Room 109-110 10:00-12:00            Moderators: Masoom Haider, M.D. & Bachir Taouli, M.D.

10:00           . Liver Specific Contrast Media: Do they Really Make a Difference?

Scott B. Reeder, M.D.

 

10:30           . Cancer in the Difficult Liver

Ihab R. Kamel, M.D., Ph.D.

 

11:00           . MRI of Diffuse Liver Disease

Claude B. Sirlin, M.D.

 

11:30           . MRI of Transplanted Liver

David J. Lomas, M.D., F.R.C.R., F.R.C.P.

 

12:00           . Adjournment

 

Gold Corporate Symposium: Siemens

Plenary Hall 12:15-13:15           

 

Traditional Poster Session: MRS, non-H1 & ESR; Interventional

Exhibition Hall 13:30-15:30           

 

Electronic Poster Session: Pulse Sequence & Reconstruction A

Exhibition Hall 13:30-15:30           

Study Group Session: Current Issues in Brain Function

Room 203-204 13:30-15:30           

 

Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI: Methods & Applications

Plenary Hall 13:30-15:30            Moderators: Matthew G. Orton & Steven P. Sourbron

13:30           0235.Introduction

Steven P. Sourbron

 

13:42           0236.Comparison of Arterial Input Functions by Magnitude & Phase Signal Measurement in Dynamic Contrast Enhancement MRI Using a Dynamic Flow Phantom

SUMMA25Sangjune Laurence Lee1, Warren Foltz1, Brandon Driscoll1, Ali Fatemi1, Cynthia Menard1, Catherine Coolens1, Caroline Chung1

1Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Determining the arterial input function (AIF) is critical for the accuracy of kinetic modeling of DCE MRI measures. However, the magnitude signal derived AIF suffers from in-flow, slice profile, and T2* effects. Phase signal has been shown to be an alternative method of acquiring the AIF data. Here, we evaluate the accuracy of AIFs derived from the magnitude and phase signal in a dynamic flow phantom, providing a controlled, gold-standard framework. The phase-derived AIF approached actual peak Gd-DTPA concentrations within all imaging slices and at tested flow rates up to 7.5 mL/s, while the magnitude-derived AIF was grossly attenuated.

 

13:54           0237.Evaluation of Reproducibility of Measured Arterial Input Functions and DCE-MRI Derived Model Estimates Obtained Using Either Pre-Bolus Individual AIF’s or Population Derived AIF’s

Mihaela Rata1, David Collins1, James Darcy1, Christina Messiou1, Nina Tunariu1, Martin Leach1, Nandita Desouza1, Matthew Orton1

1MRI Unit, CR-UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, United Kingdom

Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI requires an estimate/measurement of the arterial input function (AIF) to derive pharmacokinetic parameters. This study investigated a cohort of 21 patients, evaluating the usefulness of measured patient specific AIF’s as derived from pre-bolus compared with a population-based averaged AIF. The variation of extracted AIF’s was explored over 3 vertical segments of the aorta in order to define the most reproducible region. The reproducibility of the pharmacokinetic parameter Ktrans was measured using various AIF’s. The results suggest no improvement of the study reproducibility when using the individual AIF derived from coronal pre-bolus data.

 

14:06           0238.The Impact of Overall Injection Time on the Arterial Input Function and Pharmaco-Kinetic Analysis Using the Tofts Model in DCE-MRI for Prostate Cancer Patients

MAGNA25Andrea Holt1, Edoardo Pasca1, Stijn W. Heijmink2, Jelle Teertstra2, Sara H. Muller2, Uulke A. van der Heide1

1Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam, Netherlands; 2Department of Radiology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam, Netherlands

In prostate cancer patients, we studied the effect of overall contrast agent injection time on the form of the arterial input function and on the outcome of pharmaco-kinetic analysis in healthy tissue. We found that below an overall injection time of 10 s no further sharpening of the first pass peak is observed.

 

14:18           0239.Estimation of the Arterial Input Function in a Mouse Tail from the Signal Phase of Projection Profiles

Jennifer Moroz1, Andrew Yung1, Piotr Kozlowski1, Stefan Reinsberg1

1Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Quantitative DCE-MRI analysis requires an accurate measure of the arterial input function (AIF). The AIF should have a high temporal resolution and be acquired for each experiment. However, AIF acquisition in mice is challenging because of their small size and rapid heart rates. This work demonstrates that a high temporal resolution AIF may be determined from a series of projection scans using phase data. An AIF in a mouse tail, having a temporal resolution of 100 ms, was successfully measured. The results suggest that rapid AIF acquisition in a mouse is possible and it may be interleaved with DCE experiments.

 

14:30           0240.Reproducibility of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Perfusion Parameters on Various Computer Aided Diagnosis Workstations: Taking a Peek Into the Black Box.

MAGNA25Tobias Heye1, Matthew Davenport2, Jeff Horvath1, Sebastian Feuerlein1, Steven Breault1, Mustafa Bashir1, Elmar M. Merkle1, Daniel T. Boll1

1Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, United States; 2Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, United States

Although many factors contributing to overall measurement error have been identified, the effect of commercially available DCE-MRI post-processing solutions on quantitative (Ktrans, kep, ve) and semi-quantitative (iAUGC) pharmacokinetic parameters has yet to be defined. This study assessed the reproducibility of pharmacokinetic parameters between various commercially available post-processing solutions for DCE-MRI (Tissue4DTM, Siemens, Germany; DynaCADTM, Invivo, USA; AegisTM, Sentinelle Medical, Canada; CADvueTM; iCAD, Inc., USA). There is substantial variability (25.1-74.1% coefficient of variation) for DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters across commercially available DCE-MRI post-processing solutions. If DCE-MRI is to succeed as a widely incorporated biomarker, the industry must agree on a post-processing standard.

 

14:42           0241.Comparison of Signal Intensity & Standard Techniques for Estimation of Pharmacokinetic Parameters in DCE-T1 Studies of Glioblastoma: Using Model Selection

Hassan Bagher-Ebadian1, 2, Siamak P. Nejad-Davarani1, 3, Rajan Jain4, Douglas Noll3, Quan Jiang1, Ali Syed Arbab4, Tom Mikkelsen5, James R. Ewing1, 2

1Neurology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI, United States; 2Physics, Oakland University, Rochester, MI, United States; 3Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, United States; 4Radiology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI, United States; 5Neurosurgery, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI, United States

DCE-pharmacokinetic models rely on the construction of an observation equation which demands conversion of the measured signal intensity (SI) profile into an indicator concentration time-course. Recent studies have proposed that the normalized SI [(St-S0)/S0] be used instead of the longitudinal-relaxation-rate change (&#916;R1) in DCE-MRI permeability analyses. However, we know of no assessment of the agreement in the estimated permeability parameters using different measures of concentrations (SI-&#916;R1). The goal of this study is to evaluate the use of SI, as opposed to &#916;R1, in the estimation of permeability parameters in DCE-T1-3D-Spoiled-Gradient-Echo studies in the brains of ten treatment-naïve patients with glioblastoma.

 

14:54           0242.Uncertainty Maps in Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI

Anders Garpebring1, Patrik Brynolfsson1, Jun Yu2, Ronnie Wirestam3, Adam Johansson1, Thomas Asklund4, Mikael Karlsson1

1Dept. of Radiation Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; 2Centre of Biostatistics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden; 3Dept. of Medical Radiation Physics, Lund University, Lund; 4Division of Oncology, Dept. of Radiation Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden

In dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, errors propagate in a highly non-trivial way from a number of sources of uncertainty to the parametric maps. A method for

 

15:06           0243.The Comparison of Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion MRI & DCE-MRI in Patients with Prostate Cancer

Wenchao Cai1, Feiyu Li1, Jing Wang2, Jue Zhang2, 3, Xiaoying Wang1, 2, Xuexiang Jiang1

1Department of Radiology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, China; 2Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing, China; 3College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, China

Introduction:Arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI has the advantage of no administration of the extrinsic tracer which are capable of absolutely quantitatively measuring the microvascular perfusion characteristics of tissue. Purpose: To explore the correlation between the BF from ASL and kinetic parameters from DCE-MRI in patients with prostate cancer.Methods: Six patients with pathologically confirmed prostate cancer were recruited in this study to take the PASL pulse sequence and DCE MR examinations. Results:Significant positive correlations between BF value and Ktrans, Kep were observed in all four TI (p < 0.05, Spearman¡¯s correlation analysis). However, no significant correlation between BF and Ve was found. Conclusion:The arterial spin labeling sequence with no contrast medium allows extraction of blood flow information specific to the angiogenic process of prostate.

 

15:18           0244.Predictive Value of MRI - Perfusion Parameters in Patients with Liver Metastases

MAGNA25Wieland H. Sommer1, Marco Armbruster1, Steven Sourbron1, Maximilian F. Reiser1, Christoph Zech1

1Department of Clinical Radiology, University of Munich, Großhadern Hospital, Munich, Bavaria, Germany

A dynamic contrast enhanced MRI protocol for the liver was established in neuroendocrine tumors with liver metastases. To find the clinical value of DCE-MRI parameters, these were correlated with FDG-PET-CT parameters and clinical parameters. We found that the arterial plasma flow highly correlates with SUV vales from PET-CT and therefore can monitor the metabolism of the metastases. Other parameters correlated with tumor markers or clinical outcome parameters.

 

Advanced Imaging of Prenatal/Neonatal Brain Injury

Room 201 13:30-15:30            Moderators: Linda Chang & Pratik Mukherjee

13:30           0245.Graph Theory to Analyse Developmental Plasticity in Connectivity of Preterm Children

Elda Fischi-Gomez1, 2, Alessandra Griffa1, Alessandro Daducci1, François Lazeyras3, 4, Jean-Philippe Thiran1, 5, Petra S. Hüppi2

1Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL). Signal Processing Laboratory (LTS5), Lausanne, Switzerland; 2Division of Development and Growth. Department of Pediatrics. University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland; 3Center for Biomedical Imaging (CIBM), ,Lausanne and Geneva, Switzerland; 4Department of Radiology, University of Geneva and University Hospital of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland; 5Department of Radiology of the University Hospital Center (CHUV) and University of Lausanne (UNIL), Lausanne, Switzerland

We used DTI and network analysis to determine the impact of prematurity and prenatal growth restriction in neurostructural outcome of preterm born children at age 6 years-old. We construct individual brain network graphs derived from structural connectivity matrices, composed by an efficacy component (weighted by the mean FA value of the bundle connecting two cortical regions) and the density component (assumed to be constant within a group). Both groups, when compared to controls, show smaller efficiency (with an average path length's increase) and transitivity that may contribute to learning disabilities and behavior disorders linked to preterm infants at school age.

 

13:42           0246.Testing the Sensitivity of Tract-Based Spatial Statistics to Simulated Treatment Effects in Preterm Neonates

Gareth Ball1, Serena J. Counsell1, Tomoki Arichi1, 2, Nazakat Merchant1, 2, Daniel Rueckert3, A David Edwards1, 2, James P. Boardman, 14

1Centre for the Developing Brain, Imaging Sciences Department, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; 2Division of Neonatology, Imperial College London Healthcare NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom; 3Biomedical Image Analysis Group, Department of Computing, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; 4Simpson Centre for Reproductive Health, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Preterm birth is associated with poor neurodevelopmental outcome. Microstructural alterations in the developing white matter are thought to represent key components of preterm brain injury. Developing early imaging biomarkers that are sensitive to these alterations, such as TBSS, would be beneficial to the evaluation of early neuroprotective strategies in preterm infants. Here, the sensitivity of TBSS to detect changes in white matter microstructure in neonates is tested by simulating global treatment ‘effects’, represented by increased fractional anisotropy, in groups of different sizes. Simulations were found to predict well a real biological effect, represented by increasing age at scan.

 

13:54           0247.Microstructural Brain Abnormalities in Neonates with Prenatal Stimulant Exposure

Linda Chang1, Kenichi Oishi2, Jon Skranes3, Steve Buchthal1, Caroline Jiang1, Dan Alicata4, Antonette Hernandez1, Heather Johansen1, Christine Cloak1, Tricia Wright5, Lillian Fujimoto6, Susumu Mori2, Thomas Ernst1

1Dept of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, United States; 2Dept of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States; 3Dept of Laboratory Medicine, Children’s & Women’s Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Tronheim, Oslo, Norway; 4Dept of Psychiatry, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, United States; 5Dept of Obstetric & Gynecology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, United States; 6Straub Mililani Clinic, Mililani, HI, United States

Prenatal stimulant-exposure, with nicotine and/or methamphetamine may be associated with abnormal brain development, although data in humans are limited. This study aims to evaluate whether the major white matter tracts and deep gray matter are abnormal in neonates with stimulant exposure (n=18) compared to unexposed healthy neonates (n=45). An automated atlas with LDDMM was used to assess diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures. Stimulant-exposed neonates showed lower FA in fornix and slower age-related decline in diffusion (axonal and radial) in the superior longitudinal fasciculus than unexposed infants. These findings suggest delayed brain myelination despite similar subject characteristics at time of scans.

 

14:06           0248.Longitudinal Structural Brain Changes in Children & Adolescents with Prenatal Alcohol Exposure

SUMMA25Catherine Lebel1, Eric Kan2, Sarah Mattson3, Edward Riley3, Kenneth Jones4, Colleen Adnams5, Philip May6, Mary O'Connor7, Katherine Narr1, Elizabeth Sowell, 12

1Neurology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, United States; 2Children's Hospital Los Angeles, CA, United States; 3Psychology, San Diego State University, CA, United States; 4Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego, CA, United States; 5Psychiatry and Mental Health, University of Cape Town, South Africa; 6Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, United States; 7Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, United States

Children and youth prenatally exposed to alcohol demonstrate structural brain abnormalities compared to controls, but it is not clear whether these abnormalities change over time. In the first longitudinal study of cortical development, we demonstrate several brain regions with different developmental trajectories between alcohol-exposed subjects and controls, mainly in the parietal lobe. In general, subjects with prenatal alcohol exposure demonstrated less overall volume change, suggesting decreased cortical plasticity compared to controls. These results are important to consider in studies of group differences, which may change over time, and also are relevant for treatment and interventions in this population.

 

14:18           0249.Predicting Neurological Outcome in Neonatal Encephalopathy: A Machine Learning and Network Analysis Approach

Etay Ziv1, Olga Tymofiyeva1, Sonia L. Bonifacio2, Patrick S. McQuillen2, Donna M. Ferriero2, A James Barkovich1, Duan Xu1, Christopher P. Hess1

1Department of Radiology & Biomedical Imaging, UCSF, San Francisco, CA, United States; 2Department of Pediatrics, UCSF, San Francisco, CA, United States

Neonatal encephalopathy represents a heterogeneous group of conditions associated with life-long developmental disabilities. The ability to predict outcome early on in the perinatal period could potentially have a significant impact on subsequent treatment. Structural connectivity networks of the brain can be constructed using diffusion MRI. We hypothesize that networks derived from patients who have poor outcome may have different structure than those who have good outcome. Here we present an unbiased approach to enumerate a large set of network properties and using a combination of unsupervised and supervised learning, we demonstrate surprisingly good discrimination between good and poor neurological outcome.

 

14:30           0250.DTI of the Inter-Hemispheric Connectivities in Neonates with Transposition of the Great Arteries Undergoing Cardiopulmonary Bypass Surgery.

Malek I. Makki1, Rabia Liamlahi2, Hitendu Dave3, Bea Latal4, Vera Bernet5, Ianina Scheer6, Klaudija Batinic2, Cornelia Hagmann7, Walter Knirsch2

1MRI Research, University Children Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 2Cardiology, University Children Hospital Zurich; 3Congenital Cardiovascular Surgery, University Children Hospital Zurich; 4Child Development, University Children Hospital Zurich; 5Pediatrics Intensive Care, University Children Hospital Zurich; 6Diagnostic Imaging, University Children Hospital Zurich; 7University Hospital Zurich

Fifteen neonates with d-transposition of the great artery underwent DTI before and after cardiopulmonary bypas surgery. The genu and splenium od the corpus callosum were investigated with DTI and compared to ten age amtched healthy neonates. Abnormal white matter growth was reported in the genu but not in the splenium.

 

14:42           0251.The Variation of White Matter Tract in Neonates with Mild Hypoxic-Ischemic Injury:A Diffusion Tensor Image Analysis by Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS)

Gao Jie1, Li Xianjun2, Hou Xin1, Sun Qinli1, Yu Bolang1, Ed X Wu3, Wan Mingxi2, Yang Jian1

1Department of radiology, the first affiliated hospital of medical college, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shannxi, China; 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shannxi, China; 3Laboratory of Biomedical Imaging and Signal Processing, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China

TThe aim of this study is to use tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) to test the voxel-wise differences in fractional anisotropy (FA),λ1,λ2,λ3 between normal and mild hypoxic-ischemic (HI) neonatal brains. 41 full term neonates (17 neonates with mild HI injury, 24 neonates as normal control,) and 31 preterm neonates (11 neonates with mild HI injury, 20 neonates as normal control) underwent T1 weighted images (T1WIs), T2 weighted images (T2WIs) and diffusion tensor image (DTI) within 28 days after birth. The results of TBSS mainly showed significantly decreased FA and increased λ2, λ3 in multiple white matter tracts (p<0.05). These differences of DTI indexes between the mild HI and normal neonates were mainly located in cerebral peduncle (CP), posterior limb of internal capsule (PLIC) and corona radiata (CR) both in full term and preterm groups. Moreover, the additional regions with above changes of DTI indexes in full term neonates were exhibited in external capsule (EC) and splenium of the corpus callosum (SCC) mainly. This is the first study to explore white matter injury in both preterm and term neonatal brains with mild HI injury by using TBSS for DTI data analyzing. TBSS, as an objective and sensitive method, can reveal multiple white matter microstructural abnormalities in mild HI neonatal brains.

 

14:54           0252.Diffusion Tractography in Term Neonates with Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy: Projection Fiber System & Corpus Callosum Involvement as Predictors of Neurodevelopmental Outcome

Katyucia de Macedo Rodrigues1, Maria de Carmen Fons Stupina2, 3, Ainsley MacLean4, Janet Soul2, Rudolph Pienaar5, Omar Khwaja2, P. Ellen Grant5

1Radiology, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusettes, United States; 2Neurology, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusettes, United States; 3Pediatric Neurology, Sant Joan de Seu Hospital for Children, Barcelona, Spain; 4Neuroradiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusettes, United States; 5Center for Fetal-Neonatal Neuroimaging & Developmental Science, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusettes, United States

We performed a tractography-based DTI analysis of projection and comissural tracts in term/near term neonates who presented perinatal HIE and had a brain MRI performed within 7 postnatal days and neonates with normal MRI without HIE and studied its correlation with early motor outcome.

 

15:06           0253.Quantitative Improvement in FA Values in Various Fiber Bundles Is Associated with Improvement in Clinical Grade of Children with Cerebral Palsy Following Therapy

Saurabh Chaturvedi1, Puneet Goyal2, Vimal K. Paliwal3, Ankita Chourasia1, Yogita Rai1, Ravindra Kumar Garg4, Ram Kishore Singh Rathore5, Rakesh Kumar Gupta1

1Radiodiagnosis, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar pradesh, India; 2Anaesthesiology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India; 3Neurology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, UP, India; 4Neurology, Chhatrapati Sahu ji Maharaj Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India; 5Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur

We examined 10 CP children twice (10 base line&10 follow up at 6month; 8 boys&2 girls) (mean age=6 years) who had spastic diplegia, GMFM score ranging from 50-60 and with grade II spasticity. There was a significant difference between FA values of baseline and follow-up in left motor, left sensory, CG, ATR, PTR bundles. A significant positive correlation was found between GMFM scores and FA values of left motor (r=0.723, p<0.001), left sensory (r=0.609, p=0.004), CG (r=0.787, p<0.001) and ATR (r=0.420, p=0.065).We conclude that improvement in white matter fibers is associated with physical improvement in these children.

 

15:18           0254.Prognostic Significance of Combined Diffusion Weighted Imaging & Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Neonates with Hypoxic Ischemic Injury

Eva-Maria Ratai1, Jason M. Johnson2, Bindu Setty2, Joseph Chou3, Kalpathy Krishnamoorthy4, Paul Caruso2, P Ellen Grant5

1Radiology, A. A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital , Charlestown, MA, United States; 2Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, United States; 3Pediatric Medical Services / Neonatal ICU, Massachusetts General Hospital, United States; 4Pediatric Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, United States; 5Radiology, Children’s Hospital Boston, United States

The goal of this study was to investigate the prognostic values of ADC and MRS in neonatal hypoxic ischemic injury within 5 days of life. Eight of 17 patients died before discharge from the hospital and nine had unfavorable outcome including severe developmental delay. Low concentrations of N-acetylaspartate, choline, creatine and low ADC values in the basal ganglia were predictive of poor outcome. High glutamate/glutamine levels were also associated with poor outcome. Spearman Rank analysis between ADC and spectroscopic markers revealed significant correlations between ADC and choline as well as ADC and N-Acetylaspartate. No correlation with lactate was found.

 

Body Diffusion

Room 202 13:30-15:30            Moderators: David J. Collins & Bachir Taouli

13:30           0255.The Feasibility of Evaluating Treatment Response of Bone Metastases by Segmenting Tumor Diffusion Volumes to Estimate Total Disease Burden on Whole Body Diffusion-Weighted Imaging

Matthew D. Blackledge1, Dow-Mu Koh1, Anwar R. Padhani2, James J. Stirling2, N J. Taylor2, David J. Collins1, Martin O. Leach1

1CR-UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, United Kingdom; 2Paul Strickland Scanner Centre, Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Northwood, London, United Kingdom

There is currently no standard for evaluating response of bone metastases to novel therapeutics, greatly inhibiting pharmaceutical development. In this feasibility study we investigate the role of tumour burden estimates and apparent diffusion coefficients measured using whole body diffusion weighted imaging (WBDWI) for monitoring treatment response. Good correlations are found between final clinical outcome in patients diagnosed with bone metastases and changes in median ADC value and tumour burden, as predicted using semi-automatic segmentation methods. It is concluded that such measurements from WBDWI will provide a useful tool in future clinical trials.

 

13:42           0256.Whole-Body MRI, Including Diffusion-Weighted Imaging, for Staging Lymphoma: Comparison to CT in 101 Patients

SUMMA25Thomas Kwee1, Malou Vermoolen1, Erik Akkerman2, Marie José Kersten3, Rob Fijnheer4, Inge Ludwig5, Frederik Beek1, Maarten van Leeuwen1, Marc Bierings6, Joseph Zsiros7, Henriëtte Quarles van Ufford1, Jaap Stoker2, Willem Mali1, Rutger-Jan Nievelstein1

1Radiology, UMC Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands; 2Radiology, AMC Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands; 3Hematology, AMC Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands; 4Hematology, Meander MC, Amersfoort, Netherlands; 5Hematology, UMC Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands; 6Pediatric Hematology, UMC Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands; 7Pediatric Hematology, AMC Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Whole-body MRI may be an alternative to CT for staging lymphoma. Furthermore, the use of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) may facilitate staging because of its high lesion-to-background contrast. In this prospective multicenter study including 101 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed lymphoma, staging of newly diagnosed lymphoma using whole-body MRI (without and with DWI) equalled staging using CT in the majority of patients. Disagreements between whole-body MRI and CT were mostly caused by overstaging of the former relative to the latter, with the number of correctly and incorrectly overstaged cases being approximately equal. The potential advantage of DWI is still unproven.

 

13:54           0257.Predict Metastatic & Benign Lymph Nodes in Patients with Gastric Carcinoma by Using Diffusion-Weighted Imaging

Jin Cheng1, Yi Wang1, Jie Deng2, Robert J McCarthy3, Gongwei Wang4, Yingjiang Ye5, He Wang6, Xiangke Du1

1Department of Radiology, Peking University People's Hospital, Beijing, China; 2Department of Radiology, Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL, United States; 3Department of Anesthesiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, United States; 4Department of Pathology, Peking University People's Hospital, Beijing, China; 5Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Peking University People's Hospital, Beijing, China; 6GE Health Care

We prospectively proposed to assess the predictive capability of DWI in determing metastatic and benign lymph nodes in patients with gastric carcinoma. The median ADC value of metastatic nodes was lower than that of the benign nodes and a statistical difference was seen. DWI represented as ADC values shows more accurately diagnostic performance in predicting nodal metastases in gastric carcinoma than dose conventional MRI. Furthermore, DWI combined with conventional MRI had the greatest predictive power compared to DWI or anatomic MRI alone, which can provide a great help in determining appropriate therapeutic strateges.

 

14:06           0258.Effects of Gradient Nonlinearity, Its Correction Methods & Distortion on Diffusion Weighted Imaging

MAGNA25Ek T. Tan1, Luca Marinelli1, Zachary W. Slavens2, Christopher J. Hardy1, Kevin F. King2

1GE Global Research, Niskayuna, NY, United States; 2GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI, United States

The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) obtained with diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) is a promising non-contrast cancer imaging bio-marker. Gradient nonlinearity (GN) results in spatially-varying ADC, an effect that is confounded by distortion related to the DWI acquisition. Evaluations were performed in two whole-body MRI systems at 1.5T in various anatomical regions. GN correction (GNC) used up to 13 orders of spherical harmonics, and was used with and without the full b-matrix in the diffusion-tensor computation. GNC resulted in a significant reduction in ADC error in both systems. Distortion effects resulted in a significant ADC difference between both systems.

 

14:18           0259.In-Vivo Reliability Assessment of Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Diffusion Weighted MRI Parameters

Moti Freiman1, Jeannette M. Perez-Rossello1, Michael J. Callahan1, Mark Bittman1, Stephan D. Voss1, Robert V. Mulkern1, Simon K. Warfield1

1Radiology, Children's Hospital Boston/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States

 

14:30           0260.Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Imaging of the Liver: Which Affects More on Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Changes of Cirrhosis & Liver Lesions, D or D*?

Shintaro Ichikawa1, Utaroh Motosugi1, Tomoaki Ichikawa1, Hiroyuki Morisaka1, Katsuhiro Sano1, Tetsuya Wakayama2, Tsutomu Araki1

1University of Yamanashi, Chuo, Yamanashi, Japan; 2Advanced Application Center, GE Healthecare Japan

 

14:42           0261.Free Breathing Liver DWI Using PROPELLER-DW-EPI with Inherent Reductions of Geometric Distortion & Motion Artifacts at 1.5T

Hing-Chiu Chang1, 2, Nan-Kuei Chen3, Chun-Jung Juan4, Tzu-Chao Chuang5, Cheng-Wen Ko6, Hsiao-Wen Chung2, 4

1Global Applied Science Laboratory, GE Healthcare, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Brain Imaging and Analysis Center, Duke University, North Carolina, United States; 4Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taiwan; 5Electrical Engineering, National Sun Yat-sen University, Taiwan; 6Department of Computer Science and Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Taiwan

Quantitative ADC measurement in liver has been shown to facilitate differential diagnosis of simple versus hydatid cyst. The consequent changes in repetition time of respiratory gating DW-EPI may lead to bias in ADC quantification, especially for long T1 hepatic cyst. The aim of this study is to demonstrate a free breathing ADC measurement method using PROPELLER-DW-EPI. The removal of oblique N/2 ghost prior to PROPELLER reconstruction was accomplished using reference-based and the other reference-free (2D phase-cycled reconstruction) methods, with their results compared. Our preliminary result demonstrates that free breathing PROPELLER-DW-EPI is an attractive alternative for precise ADC measurements in liver.

 

14:54           0262.Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Diffusion-Weighted Imaging for Detection of Liver Fibrosis in HCV: Comparison of Four Sequences

Hadrien Arezki Dyvorne1, Thomas Nevers1, Nicola Galea2, M. Isabel Fiel3, David Carpenter1, Edmund Wong1, Matthew Orton4, Andre de Oliveira5, Marie-Louise Vachon3, Manjil Chatterji1, Douglas Dieterich3, Bachir Taouli1

1Radiology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, United States; 2Sapienza University, Rome, Italy; 3Department of Medicine/Liver Disease, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, United States; 4CR-UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey, United Kingdom; 5AG Healthcare Sector, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany

This study compares the performance and reproducibility of four diffusion-weighted sequences using multiple b values and biexponential fit for the detection of liver fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C. We investigated the role of gradient polarity and respiratory monitoring on the reproducibility and diagnostic quality of IVIM parameters. For all sequences, results showed acceptable to excellent reproducibility and a marked decrease of diffusion, perfusion fraction and apparent diffusion coefficients with the degree of fibrosis. In addition, free breathing acquisitions were found to give the better results.

 

15:06           0263.Effect of Diffusion Time on Liver DWI

Darwin S. Gao1, 2, Zhongwei Qiao1, 2, Matthew M. Cheung1, 2, April M. Chow1, 2, Shujuan Fan1, 3, Kwan Man4, Ed X. Wu1, 2

1Laboratory of Biomedical Imaging and Signal Processing, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China; 2Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China; 3Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China; 4Department of Surgery, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China

In liver, diffusion decay can depend on not only b-value but also the diffusion time (&#8710;) because water molecule diffusion is hindered and restricted by cellular

 

15:18           0264.Diffusion Behavior in Rectal Cancer: Comparison of Mono-Exponential, Bi-Exponential & Continuously Distributed Exponential Models

He Wang1, Yingshi Sun2, Yong Zhang1, Guang Cao1

1Applied Science Lab, GE Healthcare, Shanghai, China; 2Department of Radiology, Peking University Cancer Hospital, Beijing, China

We compared three diffusion models to evaluate rectal cancer, which include mono-exponential, bi-mono-exponential and continuously distributed exponential model. We found the continuously distributed exponential model has an extremely small value of chi-square in fitting the rectal cancer diffusion data which means this model may reveal the ‘true’ distribution of diffusion components in rectal cancer.

 

Studies of Metabolism Using Hyperpolarized 13C

Room 212-213 13:30-15:30            Moderators: Rolf Gruetter & David M. Wilson

13:30           0265.Nuclear Hyperpolarization in 1H & 19F Rich Fluids Induced by Photon Beams Endowed with Orbital Angular Momentum

Remus Albu1, Daniel Elgort1, Khalid shahzad1, Ramon Erkamp1, Shiwei Zhou1, Jean-Luc Robert1

1Philips Research N.A., Briarcliff Manor, NY, United States

A novel hyperpolarization approach is presented that uses a photon beam endowed with orbital angular momentum (OAM) to induce nuclear hyperpolarization in liquids at room temperature. The feasibility of this hyperpolarization method was verified experimentally by irradiating small volumes of 1H and 19F – rich liquid samples with a focused OAM beam endowed with OAM charges of 0 to ±20. The NMR signal level for “light off” and OAM=0 conditions were comparable, while the NMR signal level increased with the absolute value of the OAM charge. The nuclear magnetic polarization of the fluid sample inside the focal spot of the OAM beam was estimated to be between ~1.5% and 5%.

 

13:42           0266.Exploiting Spatiotemporal Correlations for Accelerating Dynamic 2D Spectroscopic Imaging of Hyperpolarized Pyruvate in the Heart

MAGNA25Kilian Weiss1, Andreas Sigfridsson1, Georgios Batsios1, Marcin Krajewski1, Michael Batel2, Sebastian Kozerke1

1Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University and ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 2Physical Chemistry, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland

The investigation of real-time metabolic processes using hyperpolarized compounds requires efficient sampling schedules for sufficient spatiotemporal resolutions. Dynamic hyperpolarized 13C signals in the heart are inherently sparse and their dynamics may be represented by few temporal basis functions. To this end, spatiotemporal acceleration techniques are particularly suited to speed up acquisitions. In this work k-t PCA was implemented and tested based on simulated and hyperpolarized in-vivo data of the rat heart. Accurate reconstructions from up to 8-fold k-t undersampled data have been achieved demonstrating the potential of k-t undersampling approaches for dynamic hyperpolarized imaging of the heart.

 

13:54           0267.Monitoring Urea Transport in Rat Kidney in vivo Using Hyperpolarized 13C MRI

MAGNA25Cornelius von Morze1, Robert A. Bok1, Jeff M. Sands2, John Kurhanewicz1, Daniel B. Vigneron1

1Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, UCSF, San Francisco, CA, United States; 2Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States

Urea functions as a key osmolyte in the urinary concentrating mechanism of the renal inner medulla. The urea transporter UT-A1 is upregulated by antidiuretic hormone, facilitating faster equilibration of urea between the lumen and interstitium of the inner medullary collecting duct, resulting in the formation of more highly concentrated urine. New methods in dynamic nuclear polarization, providing ~50,000-fold enhancement of NMR signals in the liquid state, offer a novel means to monitor this process in vivo using MRI. In this study, we detected significant signal differences in the rat kidney between acute diuretic and antidiuretic states, using dynamic 13C MRI following a bolus infusion of hyperpolarized [13C]urea. More rapid medullary enhancement was observed under antidiuresis, consistent with known upregulation of UT-A1.

 

14:06           0268.In Vivo Reduction of Hyperpolarized [1-13C]-Dehydroascorbic Acid Is Affected by Glucose Transporter Expression

SUMMA25Sarah E. Bohndiek1, 2, Mikko I. Kettunen1, 2, David Lewis2, Tiago B. Rodrigues1, 2, Ferdia A. Gallagher1, 2, Dmitry Soloviev2, Kevin M. Brindle1, 2

1Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom; 2Cambridge Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom

Hyperpolarized [1-13C]-Dehydroascorbic Acid (DHA) has recently been demonstrated as a novel imaging biomarker of tumor redox status in vivo. We show here that the rate of [1-13C]-DHA reduction is also influenced by glucose transporter expression, so care should be taken to assess the effect of DHA transport on imaging studies performed with this promising hyperpolarized probe.

 

14:18           0269.In Vivo Imaging of Hyperpolarized 13C Labelled Choline & Monitoring of Metabolism

MAGNA25Trevor Wade1, 2, Hyla Allouche-Arnon3, 4, Lanette Friesen Waldner1, 5, Charles A. McKenzie1, 5, Kundan Thind1, 5, Alexei Ouriadov5, Albert Chen6, J. Moshe Gomori3, Rachel Katz-Brull3, 4

1Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada; 2XLR Imaging, London, Ontario, Canada; 3Department of Radiology, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel; 4BrainWatch Ltd, Tel-Aviv, Israel; 5Robarts Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada; 6GE Healthcare

The first noninvasive and nonradioactive imaging of choline labelled at position 1 with hyperpolarized 13C is presented as well as monitoring of its metabolism in a specific organ (the kidney) in the living rat. The chemical shift between choline and phosphocholine is sufficient to monitor the kinetics of choline metabolism using dynamic spectroscopy. Imaging and 2D CSI are also used to monitor regional choline uptake and the metabolic products.

 

14:30           0270.Non-Invasive Assessment of IDH Status in Glioblastoma Using Dynamic 13C MRS of Hyperpolarized α-Ketoglutarate

SUMMA25Myriam Marianne Chaumeil1, Sarah Woods1, Robert M. Danforth1, Hikari Yoshihara1, Alessia Lodi1, Aaron Robinson2, Joanna J. Philips2, 3, Sabrina M. Ronen1

1Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States; 2Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States; 3Pathology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States

The mutational status of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH1) was assessed using dynamic 13C MRS of hyperpolarized (HP) α-ketoglutarate in two glioblastoma cells lines: U87 transduced with IDH1 wild-type (U87IDHwt) or IDH mutant (U87IDHmut). Following injection of HP α-KG, HP 2-hydroxyglutarate and HP glutamate were detected in U87IDHmut lysates. Only HP glutamate was visible in U87IDHwt lysates. Injection of HP α-KG in live perfused U87IDHwt cells resulted in dynamic HP glutamate build-up whereas no HP glutamate was detected in perfused U87IDHmut cells. This pioneer study demonstrates that HP α-KG can inform on IDH mutational status through the dynamic assessment of its metabolism.

 

14:42           0271.Imaging Biomarkers: A Comparison of Hyperpolarized 13C MRS & Diffusion-Weighted MRI

XIAOMENG ZHANG1, Dutta Prasanta1, Gary Martinez1, N V. Rajeshkumar2, A Le2, A Maitra2, C V. Dang2, Robert J. Gillies1

1cancer imaging, Moffitt cancer center, TAMPA, FL - Florida, United States; 2School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University,, Baltimore, MD, United States

Development of novel targeted anti-cancer therapies is highly dependent on qualified in-vivo biomarkers for the therapeutic response. Small molecule drug FX11 that inhibits the lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) alters cellular energy metabolism, and reduces the tumor progression1. This procedure could be captured in-vivo by monitoring the metabolic conversion rate of 13C-labled substrates using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)2. This measurement could be compared with the most common imaging response biomarker: diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI), which is a measure of tumor cellularity. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of tumors calculated from DW-MRI has been shown to be valuable for predicting early response to therapies in a variety of cancers3. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the dynamics of metabolic conversion from 13C pyruvate to 13C lactate with FX11 treatment and compare the ability of two response biomarkers: hyperpolarized (HP) 13C-labled magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and DW-MRI in the drug sensitive tumor Panc253.

 

14:54           0272.Real-Time Metabolic Probe Into Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease with Hyperpolarized Carbon-13

Philip Lee1, Maegan Lim2, Weiping Han2, George Radda1

1functional Metabolism Group, Singapore Bioimaging Consortium, Singapore, Singapore; 2Lab Of Metabolic Medicine, Singapore Bioimaging Consortium, Singapore, Singapore

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) induces changes in liver metabolism. In order to measure such functional aberration, we injected hyperpolarized carbon-13-labeled pyruvate into a mouse model of hepatic steatosis and followed its metabolism in real-time and in-vivo. Initial results showed elevation in malate and aspartate levels, suggesting an increase in pyruvate carboxylase flux. Glucose tolerance test reveals glucose intolerance, a harbinger of diabetes. Quantification of pyruvate carboxylase flux via hyperpolarized pyruvate, as well as measures of downstream malate and aspartate metabolite pools could serve as alternative biomarkers of hepatic steatosis.

 

15:06           0273.Hyperpolarized 13C Imaging of Metabolic Remodeling in a Porcine Cardiac Ischemia-Reperfusion Model

MAGNA25Angus Z. Lau1, 2, Albert P. Chen3, William Dominguez-Viqueira2, Marie A. Schroeder2, 4, Yiping Gu2, Jennifer Barry2, John Graham2, 5, Nilesh Ghugre2, Graham A. Wright1, 2, Charles H. Cunningham1, 2

1Dept. of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 2Imaging Research, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 3GE Healthcare, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 4Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; 5Cardiology, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

A dual respiratory and cardiac-gated, multi-slice, single-shot spiral frequency-specific 13C pulse sequence was used to characterize cardiac metabolic remodeling following acute myocardial infarction in vivo in a porcine ischemia-reperfusion model. We observed two distinct phenotypes, corresponding to myocardial stunning and infarction, with distinct metabolic remodeling patterns revealed by hyperpolarized 13C imaging. PDH flux was reduced following LAD occlusion, with recovery in stunned myocardium. Elevated myocardial lactate was observed in the peri-infarct region, presumably reflecting the potential viability of the myocardium in that area. This work may potentially enable a clinically feasible assessment of salvageable myocardium (the area-at-risk) in myocardial infarction.

 

15:18           0274.Proof of Concept Clinical Trial of Hyperpolarized C-13 Pyruvate in Patients with Prostate Cancer

Sarah J. Nelson1, 2, John Kurhanewicz3, Daniel B. Vigneron, Peder Larson, Andrea Harzstarck, Marcus Ferrone, Mark van Criekinge, Jose Chang, Robert Bok, Ilwoo Park, Galen Reed, Lucas Carvajal, Jason Crane, Jan Henrik Ardenkjaer-Larsen4, Albert Chen5, Ralph Hurd6, Liv-Ingrid Odegardstuen7, James Tropp6

1Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States; 2Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States; 3University of California, San Francisco, United States; 4General Electric Healthcare, Denmark; 5General Electric Healthcare, Toronto, Canada; 6General Electric Healthcare, Fremont, CA, USA; 7General Electric Healthcare, Oslo, Norway

The first clinical trial using C-13 MR metabolic imaging has been successfully performed in patients with biopsy proven prostate cancer. In this dose escalation study 31 patients received an injection of 250mM hyperpolarized C-13 pyruvate, followed by metabolic imaging at 3T. Dynamic data showed arrival of C-13 pyruvate approximately 20 seconds after injection and demonstrated that the T1 was long enough to detect uptake and conversion to lactate for 60+ seconds. There were no dose limiting toxicities observed. The highest dose of 0.43mL/Kg gave the best lactate SNR and contrast in lactate/pyruvate for tumor relative to normal prostate.

 

 

Osteoarthritis: Cartilage & Menisci

Room 219-220 13:30-15:30            Moderators: James M. Linklater & Ashley A. Williams

13:30           0275.In Vitro Mapping of 1H Ultrashort T2 & T2* of Porcine Menisci: Analysis of the Signal Decay Reveals Collagenous Fibril Texture

Stefan Kirsch1, Michael Kreinest2, Gregor Reisig2, Lothar R. Schad1

1Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Germany; 2Department for Experimental Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery, University Medical Centre Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany

In this study, single-slice 1H mapping of ultrashort T2 and T2* was performed on porcine menisci. The signal decays were analyzed using a monoexponential, biexponential, and a Gaussian-exponential fit function. The quality of the curve fits was estimated and visualized by calculating the reduced chi-squared (χ 2red, “goodness of fit”) for each pixel. Areas with different type of signal decay were identified. Analysis of the parameter maps suggests that these areas can be assigned to regions with different collagenous texture. In future, in-vivo mapping of ultrashort T2*/T2 may provide a tool for early detection of tissue degeneration of menisci.

 

13:42           0276.T1p & T2 Show Regional Variation in Degenerate Human Menisci: Correlation with Biomechanics & Matrix Composition

Min-Sun Son1, Marc Levenston2, Brian Hargreaves3, Weitian Chen4, Stuart Goodman5, Garry Gold

1Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States; 2Mechanical Engineering; 3Radiology, Stanford University; 4GE Healthcare; 5Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University

T1&#961; and T2 values from different regions of degenerated meniscal specimens were obtained using 3D MAPSS sequence with short echo times. Proteoglycan and collagen content and different mechanical properties were additionally measured for those regions. While regional patterns of the T1&#961; and T2 did not match those of the extracellular matrix composition or mechanical moduli, T1&#961; and T2 showed strong correlation with water and moderate correlation with mechanical properties. A strong, positive correlation between T1&#961; and T2 was also found for all pooled regions despite the apparent lack of correlation between proteoglycan and collagen content. The findings in this study provide insight to understanding the physical meaning of T1&#961; and T2 values.

 

13:54           0277.The GAG Quantification in Articular Cartilage Depends on the Mechanical Strain & Gadolinium Concentration - A Microscopic MRI Study

Nian Wang1, Yang Xia1

1Dept of Physics and Center for Biomedical Research, Oakland University, Rochester, MI, United States

To investigate the effects of mechanical strain and gadolinium (Gd) concentration on the quantitative determination of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) in articular cartilage, MRI T1 procedure was used to map the depth-dependent profiles of Gd and GAG in cartilage at 17.6µm pixel resolution. T1 in native tissue (without the presence of Gd ions) was both strain-dependent and depth-dependent. Compression reduced the tissue T1 when the Gd concentration was low, but enhanced the tissue T1 when the Gd concentration was high. The loading or loading history of patients should therefore be considered in any dGEMRIC-like procedure, if the GAG quantification is desired.

 

14:06           0278.UTE Imaging of the Patella with Bi-Component Analysis: Correlation with Histopathology & Polarized Light Microscopy

Jiang Du1, Chantal Pauli2, Won Bae1, Martin Lotz2, Graeme M. Bydder1, Darryl DLima2, Christine B. Chung1

1Radiology, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, United States; 2Scripps Clinic, San Diego, CA, United States

 

14:18           0279.Multi-Parametric MRI Characterization of Enzymatically Degraded Articular Cartilage

Elli-Noora Salo1, 2, Mikko J. Nissi, 23, Timo Liimatainen4, Shalom Michaeli3, Silvia Mangia3, Jutta Ellermann3, Miika T. Nieminen1, 5

1Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland; 2Department of Applied Physics, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; 3Center for Magnetic Resonance Research, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States; 4Department of Biotechnology and Molecular Medicine, A. I. Virtanen Institute, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; 5Department of Medical Technology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland

The purpose of this study was to compare various MRI parameters, (T1, T2, dGEMRIC index, T1sat, continuous-wave T, adiabatic T and T, and RAFF), after selective degradation of cartilage glycosaminoglycan and collagen. The MRI parameters exhibited different responses to the enzyme treatments: While native T1 and the dGEMRIC index detected significant differences between control and glycosaminoglycan-depleted tissue, the majority of parameters showed a significant change after collagenase treatment. Significant correlations were observed between the MRI parameters and the biomechanical properties of the tissue, indicating MRI parameters as markers of the functional properties of cartilage.

 

14:30           0280.In Vivo Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) of Articular Cartilage of Healthy & Osteoarthritis (OA) Subjects with Coverage of All Cartilage Plates

SUMMA25Jose G. Raya1, Mike Notohamiprodjo2, Svetlana Krasnokutsky, Soterios Gyftopoulos, Christian Glaser

1Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, United States; 2University of Munich

In Vivo DTI of articular cartilage has demonstrated high-diagnostic accuracy for OA in the patellar cartilage. Aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility and potential for diagnosis of in vivo DTI in all cartilage plates (patella, tibia lateral and medial and femur). DTI was performed sagittal on the right knee of 10 healthy volunteers and on 3 OA-diagnosed patients. MD and FA were measured on all cartilage plates. In the healthy population no difference in the diffusion properties among the cartilage plates was observed. OA subjects demonstrated abnormal diffusion properties in the patellofemoral and lateral tibiofemoral compartments.

 

14:42           0281.T2 Mapping & Glycosaminoglycan-Dependent Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (GagCEST) Imaging of Focal Lesions in Knee Cartilage Using 3 T MRI

Benjamin Schmitt1, Goetz H. Welsch2, Moritz Zaiss3, Stefan Zbyn, Sabine Goed, Siegfried Trattnig

1Centre for High-Field MR, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; 2University Hospital Erlangen; 3German Cancer Research Center (dkfz)

This study presents initial results from gagCEST imaging performed on a clinical 3 T-MR scanner in 3 volunteers and 9 patients with focal knee injuries. In volunteers, the performance of a B0 correction method based on retrospective correction of z-spectra was evaluated by comparison with a standard phase mapping technique. Results from volunteers suggest applicability of the correction method and indicate that gagCEST effects can be measured at 3 T. Patient results show that gagCEST effects are susceptible to changes of T2 values, but could have a value for detection of GAG loss that occurs without affecting T2.

 

14:54           0282.Inversion Recovery Sodium MRI of Cartilage in Controls & Patients with Osteoarthritis at 7T

MAGNA25Guillaume Madelin1, Gregory Chang2, Alexej Jerschow3, Ravinder R. Regatte2

1Radiology, New York University, New York, NY, United States; 2Radiology Department, New York University Medical Center, New York, NY, United States; 3Chemistry Department, New York University, New York, NY, United States

Quantitative sodium MRI is highly specific to the glycosaminoglycan content in cartilage and could be used to assess the biochemical degradation of cartilage in early stages of osteoarthritis (OA). In this preliminary study we show that quantitative sodium MRI with fluid suppression by adiabatic inversion recovery reduces significantly the partial volume effect from synovial fluids or joint effusion in the measurements of sodium concentrations in articular cartilage, and therefore may allow to better differentiate OA patients from healthy controls.

 

15:06           0283.Multiparametric MRI Assessment of Early Osteoarthritis in a Rabbit Model of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Transection

MAGNA25Jari Rautiainen1, Mikko J. Nissi1, 2, Timo Liimatainen3, Walter Herzog4, Rami K. Korhonen1, Miika T. Nieminen5, 6

1Department of Applied Physics, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; 2Center for Magnetic Resonance Research, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States; 3Department of Neurobiology, A.I. Virtanen Institute for Molecular Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; 4Faculty of Kinesiology, Engineering and Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 5Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland; 6Department of Medical Technology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland

The sensitivity of selected quantitative MRI parameters (Adiabatic T1&#961; & T2&#961;, continuous wave (CW) T1&#961;, CPMG T2, Adiabatic double echo (DE) T2, T1 during off-resonance saturation, and relaxation along fictitious field (RAFF)) to early OA changes in rabbit anterior cruciate ligament transection model was investigated. Biomechanical testing of the samples revealed altered functional properties of the tissue in response to experimental OA, and a differential response to the various MRI methods was observed. Relaxation in the rotating frame of reference (continuous wave and adiabatic T1&#961; and adiabatic T2&#961;) proved to be most sensitive in detecting early cartilage degeneration.

 

15:18           0284.Improved Assessment of Cartilage Repair Tissue Using Fluid-Suppressed 23Na Inversion Recovery MRI at 7 Tesla: Preliminary Results

MAGNA25Gregory Chang1, Guillaume Madelin1, Orrin Sherman2, Eric J. Strauss2, Ding Xia1, Michael P. Recht1, Ravinder R. Regatte1

1Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, United States; 2Orthopaedic Surgery, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, United States

Use of a fluid-suppressed, adiabatic inversion recovery 3D radial sodium MRI pulse sequence at 7 Tesla may allow more accurate quantification of sodium content within cartilage repair.

 

Clinical Intensive Course

Head & Neck MRI

Organizers: Pia C. Maly Sundgren, M.D., Ph.D. & John D. Port, M.D., Ph.D.

Room 105-106 13:30-15:30            Moderators: Sotirios Bisdas, M.D. & Ann D. King, M.D.

13:30           . MRI of the Neck: What Pulse Sequences to Use

Ashok Srinivasan, M.D., D.N.B.

 

13:55           . MRI in Pulsitile Tinnitus

Vincent F. Chong, M.D., F.R.C.R.

 

14:20           . Diffusion Imaging in Head & Neck Cancer (Pre & Post Therapeutic)

Robert Hermans, M.D., Ph.D.

 

14:50           . DCE Imaging in Head & Neck Cancer (Pre & Post Therapeutic)

Harish Poptani, Ph.D.

 

15:20           . Meet the Teachers

 

15:30 Adjournment

 

Educational Course

Cardiovascular MR Imaging: Pushing the Limits in a Changing World

Part 1: MRI of Cardiac Microstructure

Organizers: Tim Leiner, M.D., Ph.D., Thoralf Niendorf, Ph.D. & David E. Sosnovik, M.D.

Room 109-110 13:30-15:30            Moderators: Sebastian Kozerke, Ph.D. & David E. Sosnovik, M.D.

13:30           . Diffusion MRI of Explanted Hearts

Gustav J. Strijkers, Ph.D.

 

13:50           . DTI of the Heart in vivo

Wen-Yih Isaac Tseng, M.D., Ph.D.

 

14:10           . Scalars to Tracts: Analysis of Diffusion in the Heart

David E. Sosnovik, M.D.

 

14:30           . Impact of Cardiac Microstructure on Ventricular Function

Alistair A. Young, Ph.D.

 

14:50           . Integration of DTI & Cardiac Electrophysiology

Samuel A. Wickline, M.D.

 

15:10           . The Route Forward: Clinical Needs, Technical Challenges

Sonia Nielles-Vallespin, Ph.D.

 

15:30           . Adjournment

 

 

Clinical Intensive Course

Case-Based Teaching: Peripheral Nerve Imaging

Organizers: Christine Chung, M.D. & Hollis G. Potter, M.D.

Room 210-211 13:30-15:30            Moderators: John A. Carrino, M.D., M.P.H. & Hollis G. Potter, M.D.

13:30           . MR Neurography Technique & Brachial Plexus Evaluation

Avneesh Chhabra, M.D.

 

14:10           . Pelvis & Lower Extremity

John A. Carrino, M.D., M.P.H.

 

14:50           . Upper Extremity Nerve Entrapment

Ronald C. Shnier, M.D.

 

15:30           . Adjournment

 

 

Traditional Poster Session: Neuro A

Exhibition Hall 16:00-18:00           

 

Electronic Poster Session: Diffusion & Perfusion

Exhibition Hall 16:00-18:00           

Study Group Session: MR in Drug Research

Room 203-204 16:00-18:00           

 

Sequences: New Acquisition Strategies & Applications

Plenary Hall 16:00-18:00            Moderators: Charles H. Cunningham & Maxim Zaitsev

16:00           0285.Radial-Cones: a New Sampling Scheme for Compressed Sensing Accelerated 3D Ultrashort Echo Time Imaging

Kevin Michael Johnson1

1Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, United States

3D Ultra Short Echo Time (UTE) imaging holds the potential both to visualize rapidly decaying species that would not otherwise be visible1 and to dramatically improve sampling efficiency. Unfortunately, 3D imaging must be performed either with inefficiency but robust 3D radial sampling or highly efficient 3D twisting trajectories that are sensitive to structured artifacts. In this work, we embrace compressed sensing sampling theory to develop a hybrid 3D UTE trajectory, Radial Cones, that combines the efficiency of 3D cones with the robustness of 3D radial sampling.

 

16:12           0286.MR Cortical Bone Imaging Using UTE for Digitally-Reconstructed Radiographs and Attenuation Correction at 3.0T

Melanie S. Kotys-Traughber1, Bryan J. Traughber2, Michael Meltsner3, Raymond F. Muzic, Jr. 2

1MR Clinical Science, Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, OH, United States; 2Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, United States; 3Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Philips Healthcare, Fitchburg, WI, United States

Two emerging MR applications, MR-based radiation therapy planning (RTP) and hybrid PET/MR systems, require complete segmentation of cortical bone. We investigate a 3D UTE multi-echo acquisition and subtraction method for generation of MR-based digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) and attenuation correction (AC) maps. After careful calibration of the gradient hardware, the method robustly segments cortical bone in the brain. The DRRs generated from the bone-enhanced images appear sufficient for 2D patient matching. The range of TEs tested, from 90-200µs, yielded excellent signal from cortical bone and the signal from bone, tissue and air were significantly different at all TEs.

 

16:24           0287.Two New 3D Spiral-Based Trajectories

MAGNA25Dallas C. Turley1, Nicholas R. Zwart1, James G. Pipe1

1Neuroimaging Research, Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ, United States

This work presents two new 3D trajectories comparable to conventional Stack of Spirals (SOS), namely Golden EquiDistant Interleaves (GEDI) and Spherical-GEDI (S-GEDI). Both trajectories have non-Cartesian aliasing patterns in all three directions. S-GEDI collects a sphere in k-space, is not sensitive to 3D blurring, and its PSF shows less ringing than SOS or GEDI, whose PSF are identical. Both trajectories are comparable to SOS in terms of scan time, SNR efficiency and ease of implementation.

 

16:36           0288.MR Fingerprinting (MRF): A Novel Quantitative Approach to MRI

SUMMA25Dan Ma1, Vikas Gulani1, 2, Nicole Seiberlich1, Jeffrey Duerk1, Mark Griswold1, 2

1Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, United States; 2Dept. of Radiology, University Hospitals of Cleveland and Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, United States

MR Fingerprinting is a completely novel approach to quantitative MRI. Instead of collecting a series of weighted images and fitting signal time courses to an exponential model, MRF eschews collection of traditional images and a model based approach altogether. A compressed sensing based approach is adopted where information about each voxel is collected with signal timecourses generated using variable TRs, flip angles, and inversion pulses to encode relaxation information into unique signal evolution curves. Matching these curves to a comprehensive dictionary using pattern matching provides multiple parameter mappings (T1, T2, proton density and off-resonance) and synthesized reconstructed images simultaneously.

 

16:48           0289.Use of Simulated Annealing for the Design of Multiple TR BSSFP Sequences in Positive Contrast Imaging

Kuan J. Lee1, Hsu-Lei Lee1, Jürgen Hennig1, Jochen Leupold1

1Medical Physics, University Medical Centre Freiburg, Freiburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany

We introduce a novel multiple TR bSSFP sequence for positive contrast imaging. Using simulated annealing, the sequence has been designed for a spectral profile that has stopbands over both fat and water resonances. This enables simultaneous water and fat suppression, which improves contrast without requiring a second acquisition, as with for example, the PARTS (Positive Contrast with Alternating Repetition Time SSFP) technique.

 

17:00           0290.Fast, Low SAR & Off-Resonance Insensitive T2 Weighted Variable Amplitude PSIF (T2 VAPSIF) Imaging

MAGNA25Subashini Srinivasan1, 2, Wesley D. Gilson1, Aaron Flammang1, Dominik Paul3, Sunil Patil1

1Center for Applied Medical Imaging, Siemens Corporation, Corporate Research, Baltimore, MD, United States; 2Biomedical Engineering Interdepartmental Program, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, United States; 3Siemens AG, Erlangen, Germany

T2TIDE is a balanced SSFP based T2w single shot sequence which provides faster image acquisition, sharper edge resolution and lower SAR compared to HASTE. However, T2TIDE is sensitive to B0 inhomogeneities producing banding artifacts especially at higher field strengths. We present a sequence based on T2TIDE called T2w Variable Amplitude PSIF (T2VAPSIF) wherein a Kaiser-Bessel derived stabilization module and a PSIF acquisition are used. Phantom and volunteer images show that the T2VAPSIF has T2w similar to TSE and HASTE, is insensitive to B0 inhomogeneities and preserves the low SAR, sharper edge resolution and faster acquisition properties of T2TIDE.

 

17:12           0291.Resolution-Related Diffusion Damping in Fast Spin Echo Sequences

Oliver Bieri1, Carl Ganter2, Klaus Scheffler3, 4

1Division of Radiological Physics, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Basel Hospital, Basel, Switzerland; 2Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany; 3High-Field Magnetic Resonance Center, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany; 4Department of Neuroimaging and MR-Physics, Centre for Integrative Neuroscience, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany

We have recently shown that the tissue-fluid contrast of nonbalanced steady state free precession (SSFP) shows an unexpected strong sensitivity on resolution: an increase in the spatial resolution goes with an increase in spoiling moments leading to a pronounced diffusion damping of fluids. Clearly, this effect is not confined to SSFP, but can affect the contrast of other multi-pulse sequences that show resolution dependent spoiling moments, such as RARE (TSE, FSE). In this work, we will show that RARE sequences show a similar fluid-tissue contrast modulation as nonbalanced SSFP.

 

17:24           0292.